What do cutts like?

Discussion in 'Saltwater' started by GUZ808, Dec 5, 2007.

  1. GUZ808

    GUZ808 New Member

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    I had never fished for SRC out in the sound before and was wondering what kind of flies/poppers will get the job done? I will try to fish today with some random ones i picked out.
     
  2. Banzai

    Banzai FFing and VWs...Bugs & Bugs

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    I have used with success, Miyawaki Poppers, Reverse Spiders, small streamers, Wooly Buggers, Caddis Dries, Worm patterns, Sculpins, Baitfish patterns, small Comets, and others, in just about any color. As you can see, just about anything will work at any given time. Sometimes you just have to keep switching up until you find out what those fish want at that time. Sorry to be so general. However, at the beach I fish most often, a small sparsely dressed streamer tied on a tube, no weight, in blue/pink/white, and a couple of strands of opal mylar flash, is my first choice.
     
  3. chadk

    chadk Be the guide...

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    When nothing else was working for a group of us one winter morning, I tied on one of these, slowed the retreive way down, and got 4 nice cutties in about 1/2 hr:

    [​IMG]

    On another day, the one on the bottom here was the ticket:
    [​IMG]

    Othertimes pattern didn't seem to matter. Sometimes it the retrieve. If fishing shallow, try a floating line and not such a heavy clouser. Sometimes those heavier flies cause you to fish too fast just to stay off bottom - you get some short strikes, but not as many if you could just slow it down...
     
  4. dryflylarry

    dryflylarry "Chasing Riseforms"

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    I have had extremely exceptional success with a fly I call the Kilowatt Red. (It is quite similar to the Allard Fly) It is mostly a Fall/Winter fly relative to success I have had with it. The key to it's success is the following retrieve: Cast. The instant it hits the water, strip your line 2 (occasionally 3) very hard fast strips of 30"-36", pause for a second then immediately begin a short-hard twitch. Most of the time the hits will come immediately as you begin the twitch, quite often a slam. The fly is tied as such: Grizzly tail, New Age Chenille called Kilowatt Red-(which is actually a "hot pink" with sparkle in the chenille), grizzly hackle two turns, the wing is Hareline Ice Fur Polar Bear Cream topped by ownly 3 strands of orange Krystal Flash. Keep the body short! The attached pic is not the best, but will help in tying it. This fly is simple, but extremely effective for me. Tie on size #6 , SS15 Gamakasu. I will guarantee success! Hows that? :ray1:
     
  5. Fish Hunter

    Fish Hunter Too many people, not enough fish

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    Anything that's in front of their agressive little faces.:thumb:
     
  6. Preston

    Preston Active Member

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    While agreeing with Fish Hunter (if it looks alive and is even a little bit smaller than I am, it's dinner), I like to try to match the "saltwater hatches". A couple of staples in the diets of both sea-run cutthroat and resident coho during the winter are amphipods and euphausids. Amphipods are macroinvertebrates related to the common sandflea. One of the most common varieties in the Sound is orange-colored and can be imitated on a scud hook as small as a size 16. Euphausids are small shrimplike creatures (commonly called krill) and, in their huge numbers are a staple for many fish, seabirds and even baleen whales. Cutthroat and coho feeding on amphipods and euphausids appear very much like trout feeding on emergers; finning and bulging.

    Both pink and chum salmon fry hatch out early in the spring and begin their downstream journey almost as soon as they are free of the gravel. Cutthroat and bull trout sometimes either follow them down or swim up the rivers to intercept them. This slaughter of the innocents continues even after they enter salt water and the resident coho join in avidly. Sometimes this moveable feast can continue until June. Small streamers (as small as one inch in length) work well at this time. Another fishy treat is the sandlance (commonly called candlefish in this area although the true candlefish is the Columbia River smelt or eulachon) Ammodytes hexaptera which hatches out along sandy saltwater beaches in the spring.

    Later in the season, while cutts and coho continue to eat amphipods, euphausids and sandlance whenever they encounter them, they also feed heavily on stickleback, sculpin, shiner perch, herring, surf smelt and any other baitfish they come across.
     
  7. Old Man

    Old Man Just an Old Man

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    They like live bait the best. But you can't use live bait. Except live herring. But they don't stay alive long.

    Jim
     
  8. GUZ808

    GUZ808 New Member

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    thanks for all of the great info. Being that I had only fished for trout with dry flies. what will be the most effective way to retrieve these SRC flies?
     
  9. hendersonbaylocal

    hendersonbaylocal Member

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    My #1 producing fly has been a green/purple/which shock and awe tube fly pattern. It's a great fly for fishing the beach and they are available at almost every shop. I have alot of flies in my box, but 75% of them are variations on the shock and awe or a clouser pattern. Like Preston said, euphausid patterns also work great at certain times of the year. You can rig these behind a larger fly like a nymph to get max impact. A reverse spider is also a good fly to have.

    For retrieves, I usually alternate between holding the rod with my right hand and stripping in small increments with my left and tucking the rod underneath my right shoulder and using a two hand retrieve. The two hand retrieve can be deadly... it also helps you avoid the temptation to pull the fly away from a fish when you get a strike because you really need to do a "strip" set with your hand instead of lifting the rod. Experiment with your strip speed... watch your fly moving through the water and have confidence.
     
  10. Preston

    Preston Active Member

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    Amphipods are weak swimmers and can frequently be seen swimming in circles on their sides or even upside down. I fish them on a floating line with little or no movement, letting them swing with the tidal current rather like fishing a soft hackle or emerger in fresh water. I fish euphausids on a floating line too. They are somewhat stronger swimmers so I let them swing with occasional short twitches.

    The baitfish imitations I sometimes fish on an intermediate-sink line and try to make them behave like a small fish afraid of shortly becoming a cutthroat's dinner. I use an erratic strip and vary the speed and length. Keep in mind that cutthroat will often feed right up close to the beach in water that is only inches deep. I find it useful when fishing baitfish imitations to fish a quadrant from parallel out to about 45 degrees from the beach, allowing the fly to swing down-current while stripping.

    As I said, I like to try to match the saltwater hatch though I'm not above going to the Reverse Spider (which has been very effective for me) but my go-to fly has long been Leland Miyawaki's Beach Popper
    because it's more exciting and just more damned fun than any other other method. Here are my versions fo an amphipod, a euphausid and a sort of generic small baitfish.

    Here are a few of pictures of the kinds of patterns I often use (small baitfish, euphausid and amphipod, ).
     
  11. Jeremy Floyd

    Jeremy Floyd fly fishing my way through life

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    They really like muddlers on the surface riffle hitched.. I didn't take the time to read everyones responses (i apologize) but when I am covering beach there is nothing for covering water like a riffle hitched bug and some current.
     
  12. Preston

    Preston Active Member

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    Sorry, that's baitfish amphipod and euphausid in tha order.
     
  13. GUZ808

    GUZ808 New Member

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    OK I went fishing for an hour or so yesterday and caught what I think was a resident coho. If I am wrong could someone please let me know. Sorry the pic isn't that great.
     
  14. Zach M

    Zach M Because I floss so hard

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    what size hooks do you tie Amphipods and euphausids on?
     
  15. Starman77

    Starman77 Active Member

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    Preston, I like your krill pattern. I was looking at photos of krill online and I got to thinking that if krill move like shrimp, meaning that they use their tails to move backwards, then could it be possible to we're tying in the black eyes on the wrong end of the hook? If we're retrieving a fly to imitate the krill movement, then I got to thinking that the black eyes should be near the bend of the hook, not near the eye of the hook. I know krill patterns like yours and others work, so maybe it isn't that important, but what do you think about this idea?

    Rex
     
  16. Preston

    Preston Active Member

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    I tie the amohipod on scud hooks as small as size 16, the euphausid I usually tie on something like a Gamakatsu SS15 in a size 8.

    Starman, you bring up an interesting point. While euphausids do, on occasion, use a crayfish-style backflip, they usually swim with their legs, with their bodies held straight. Like euphausids (and freshwater scuds) they may also swim on their sides or upside down. I'm looking forward to seeing Bruce Ferguson's updated material in the new edition of Fly Fishing for Pacific Salmon because I know he's spent a lot of time intensively studying the invertebrates that salmon eat.

    I have, in the past, tied this pattern backward and did not find it to be any more effective when tied that way. I use extra-small, black bead-chain for the eyes, this gets it below the surface quickly and gives it a little bit of a jigging action on the retrieve. I usually fish it on a floating line if I can see fish working at the surface and, absent that, will sometimes fish it on an intermediate line as a searching pattern.

    By the way, this pattern was developed by the late Bob McLaughlin and one of the reasons I like it is its simplicity. The tail, mouth parts and antennae are pearl Krystalflash and the body is pearl Cactus chenille (Estaz, Crystal chenille); pale orange and pale pink work well too. The last step is to trim most of the chenille fibers along the back and sides, leaving those underneath to represent legs.
     
  17. GUZ808

    GUZ808 New Member

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    This fish on my attchment is what I think is a coho. but could anyone tell me a bit about this species. how big they get and their season to fish them?

    thanks
     
  18. Kevin Ryan

    Kevin Ryan Member

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    GUZ808, it looks like a silver to me. These resident fish are now entering their third year and, if they stay in the Sound and have sufficient food, they will grow nicely through the Spring and Summer reaching 24+ inches by the Fall and four to five pounds. Of course, if the season is open where you are and if the fish had no adipose fin (the small one on his back between the dorsal fin and the tail fin), you can keep the fish for the table. If it were a cutthroat or a salmon with the adipose fin intact, you would have to release it since it would be considered a wild fish.

    When you bring in a fish you plan to release, try not to lift it out of the water or pull it up on the beach. This reduces the released fish's chance of survival. Gently (if he'll let you) remove the barbless hook and send him on his way.
     
  19. GUZ808

    GUZ808 New Member

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    Thanks for the great info. but what do you mean when you say they are entering their third year?
     
  20. Starman77

    Starman77 Active Member

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    Thanks for the explanation and it is good to know that you've tried tying the pattern backwards without being any more effective. Saves me a lot of work and experimentation...

    Rex
     

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