what fly line for boat fishing? (tuna, albacore or bluefish )

Discussion in 'Saltwater' started by yuhina, Jul 20, 2011.

  1. yuhina

    yuhina Tropical member

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    Hey folks,

    I was wondering what is your favorite line or taper for boat fishing (tuna, albacore)? I don't have too much experience in fishing from a boat. A recent outing have created some frustrations... I wonder if the saltwater (boat) line have more aggressive taper...or what kind of line/taper is more suitable for casting from a boat? I have a Loomis 9 wt Cross Current rod. Any suggestion would be appreciated! Thanks!
     
  2. Jim Darden

    Jim Darden Active Member

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    a thirty foot section of T-14....or for your 9 wt, a 32 ft section of lc-13......
     
  3. yuhina

    yuhina Tropical member

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    thanks, I never thought about that. do you use mono running line?
     
  4. Denny

    Denny Active Member

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    I'm going to agree and disagree with Jim, here . . . for your 9 wt, a 28 ft, no more than 30', piece of Cortland LC-13 would work great. I love that stuff. I prefer regular intermediate running line . . . it handles better for me.
     
  5. Evan Burck

    Evan Burck Fudge Dragon

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    I've liked using a setup of Rio Slickshooter running line with Lc-13 for the sink tip. I'm also quite liking the Rio Leviathan fast sink lines.
     
  6. Joepa

    Joepa Joe from PA

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    300 gr Rio striper
     
  7. Steve Saville

    Steve Saville Active Member

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    I use a Rio Leviathan. I have both fast sinking and intermediate but usually use the fast sinking line. The nine wt. seems a bit light to me as I have used a 12 wt. most often. The Tuna here run around 25 to 35 lbs and they are like hooking on to a freight train. They take numerous deep runs and take you deep into the backing several times. My reel is a Ross Momentum 8 with about 550 yards of backing plus the line.
     
  8. yuhina

    yuhina Tropical member

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    COOL! Thanks a lot for all the great information! I think the fast sinking shooting head is a great idea... they should penetrate the wind better ... I agree the 9 weight rod probably is too light for the game, but since I haven't catch anything yet... so maybe wait until it broke and get a heavier one... : ) Thanks!
     
  9. Don Freeman

    Don Freeman Free Man

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    Problem with the 9 wt is, it will take so long to land a tuna that if you're on a charter boat someone will volunteer to break your rod for you so everyone can get back to fishing.

    I use a 12 wt with 30' of T-17.
     
  10. yuhina

    yuhina Tropical member

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    It seems you know my fishing ground very well?! Have you ever fished the east coast? or you just like to post this kind of teaser??
     
  11. Evan Burck

    Evan Burck Fudge Dragon

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    I've caught lots of skipjack on an 8wt. If the tuna you're after out there are anything like those, you'll be okay with a 9wt. But man... Can't say it wasn't tough as hell to do on an 8wt.
     
  12. alpinetrout

    alpinetrout Banned or Parked

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    There's no one line to cover that spectrum. The conditions dictate the line more than the fish. I've caught various types of tuna on everything from poppers to deep-dredged flies and everything in between. An acre-sized boiling school of longtail tuna on micro-bait dictate the use of a floater or intermediate with small flies. Chumming for yellowfin requires sinking your fly down into the zone the fish are holding at. Bluefish are the same. In the same day, I've used floaters and fast-sinking shooting heads on bluefish as the conditions changed.

    Evan - Black skipjack aren't tuna, they're bait. Joking aside, they're in the Euthynnus genus. Real tuna are Thunnus.
     
  13. Steve Saville

    Steve Saville Active Member

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    Dude I caught a pile of skip Jack in Loreto and they had my 12 wt. bent nearly in half. They took only about two runs and 10 minutes but they can really tear up some gear.
     
  14. Evan Burck

    Evan Burck Fudge Dragon

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    They're crazy for their size. They're one of those you get tired of after the first few (I think of them as the pink salmon of Baja). I've caught them on anything from an 8 to a 12, and they put the hurt on all those rods. Just have to figure out that the tail never, ever rests... So you just have to put the clamp down on them at some point.

    I go for albacore tomorrow. That'll be a new experience in tuna entirely (yes Alpinetrout, REAL tuna)
     
  15. Don Freeman

    Don Freeman Free Man

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    Out here we fish albacore that run 15 - 35 lbs. The first run is usually 150 yards, followed by a 45 minute pig pull. 10 weights are frowned on since it's not enough to get them to the boat.

    I neglected to look at your location before I spoke, just assumed this was a local question, Washington board and all that. I just don't like being under gunned, it's like going to an axe fight with a Swiss army knife because you're confident with your technique.
     
  16. yuhina

    yuhina Tropical member

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    Cool! don't forget to post some photos!
    well... some bonitos are around the shore here... those "little tuna" are always fun.

    Refer to gear selection, to me, proper gear match proper fish with good technique... and beware of those unexpected individuals.

    I have taken some respectful size stripped bass on click and paw reels. Heavy leader and proper technique get them in as quickly as using those sealed drag reels. Plus, a burning finger experience is just another priceless experience IMO.
    [​IMG][/IMG]
     
  17. yuhina

    yuhina Tropical member

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    FYI, average tune size close to shore here... video from fliesandfins

     
  18. Ian Broadie

    Ian Broadie Flyfishing is so "Metal"

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    Yah! me to. The only catch is that the Leviathans are hard to cast but on a boat it's not that big a deal since long casts are not generally the word of the day. I also like that they have an intermediate sinking running line so they get down super fast.
     
  19. Denny

    Denny Active Member

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    Agree, with the caveat the former if you're trying to get the ultimate distance out of your cast and minimize drag when the line is sinking (but they handle poorly) and the latter if you want to had an all-around good handling line. The latter 'casts' better, as the main line includes a small portion of 'handling' line behind the tip/head connecting loop.

    I have the Leviathan, and it's a solid setup. I also, though, use SA intermeidate running line (can't remember if it's .035 or .040) with nearly the same results.
     
  20. Philster

    Philster Active Member

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    Always 2 lines for me. An intermediate (which lets you use poppers too) and a quick sinking. I'm generally an advocate of heads but with serious tuna do prefer an integrated line. I like the smooth transitions for fish that realize, just about when you see color, that they aren't done yet :cool:
     

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