What is your go to rod in the salt?

Discussion in 'Saltwater' started by Ed Call, Jul 7, 2008.

  1. Porter

    Porter Active Member

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    Medium fast 7 weight or fast action six weight. My go to rods were a 7 DS2 and a 6 XP....but I downgraded to one rod and now use a 691-4 TCR and I'm still experimenting with floaters but the SA Streamer Express 250 is a nice fit for a subsurface line/fly.

    If I had to choose a rod that covers what you ask for I might think a 9.5 footer in fast action...that action will be slowed down a smear by the extra 6 inches......A strong 6 weight in 9'6" will cover most summer salmon, summer steelhead, and sw fish.

    Your set-up (5 wt. and 8 wt.) seem pretty damn good to handle most situations, but as always some rods feel better than others, some in your hands will cast farther, some you don't like feel better after casting lessons, it's a funny thing.
     
  2. Dylan D

    Dylan D Member

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    iagree


    697 XP. I haven't upgraded yet, but love this rod for the uses you've described.
     
  3. Stonefish

    Stonefish Triploid, Humpy & Seaplane Hater

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    Redington CPS 9664S 9'6" 6 Wt. Works well for both coho and src fishing.

    I used to use an 8 wt quite a bit, but find it overkill for the majority of local beach coho you'll catch. I do break it out the 8 wt when the chums show up.

    I just think a 6 wt really lets these great fish show their stuff.
     
  4. Ed Call

    Ed Call Mumbling Moderator Staff Member

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    I do love fishing a couple of great chum runs near Chico Creek, Barker Creek and Decker Creek. Those are just tough old brutes. I have been considering one of the 9 1/2 or 10 foot fast action 6wt or med fast 7wt. I think that the 8wt is fine for just about anything, but on smaller resident coho, sea runs and even some of the smaller chum it seems like overkill. Thanks again for all the input, it is good to hear what you use and why...
     
  5. rattlesnakeflyguy

    rattlesnakeflyguy Harrison

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    For what it's worth I go with a TFO TiCrX or PRO in 6WT for the springers and cohos and then a 5WT for the sea-runs & what not. The 8WT is overkill unless you hook a 15-30 pound springer, but even then, getting spooled could be more of an issue than your actual rod choice. 6WT has done me well.
     
  6. Philster

    Philster Active Member

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    Where is Cliffside? in your location?
     
  7. Ed Call

    Ed Call Mumbling Moderator Staff Member

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    Side of a cliff on the hood canal. I'm about 3 miles south of point no point. Where is the (blank) in your location?
     
  8. Jeremy Floyd

    Jeremy Floyd fly fishing my way through life

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    9'6" 6 wt Sage TCR
     
  9. Philster

    Philster Active Member

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    Woodinville. I was going to let you try 3 or 4 if you were close. You're not. I should get around to changing my location. Lazy...
     
  10. nb_ken

    nb_ken Member

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    I'm probably not terribly qualified to comment on this since I've only fished the salt a half dozen times or so and I bought my saltwater rod before I'd actually fished the salt.

    Last winter my wife decided that for the same price as flying to some tourist destination for a week and staying in hotels and such, we could probably rent a place on Whidbey Island for a month. Who am I to argue? (We leave in a couple of weeks -- yeehaw.)

    Anyway, I decided I should learn this SRC/salmon thing in anticipation of the trip. About that time, in the classifieds section on another board, I ran across a great deal on a used 6wt Loomis Cross Current GLX. It was there for like a week, taunting me, with no interested buyers. When I finally contacted the guy he said I was the only person to get in touch. I am now the proud owner of that rod.

    As you'd expect from a GLX, that is one kickass rod. It's built in a saltwater configuration with a specially-shaped grip, carbon-fiber insert and oversized guides to better shoot line. Unlike all the other Loomises I've owned (I'm kind of a Loomis guy) it has snake-foot guides rather than single foot. I'm not sure what the thinking behind that is.

    My main trout rod is a 5wt Stream Dance GLX. I haven't done an apples-to-apples comparison, but the CC seems significantly stiffer than the SD. The SD is a true 5wt rod. I would never consider over or underlining it. The first time I took out the CC I put a 6wt Rio Grand line on it. That's the only 6wt line I owned. I use it on an old broomstick-stiff, pre-Schwab Powell Tiboron. (That Powell probably would have been my saltwater rod had I not stumbled on the CC.) As you know, the Grand is a half-weight heavier than a standard line.

    The CC seemed to cast fine with the Grand, but it's hard to tell. For me, the first time out with any rod is a learning experience. It takes me a little bit to learn the nuances of the tool. (I've always felt that test driving a rod for 10 minutes in a parking lot is overrated, but that's another topic.) But the biggest thing was that I had no stripping basket that day. I learned very quickly that a basket is absolutely required in the salt. No matter what I tried, the surface tension would grab any attempts to shoot line.

    By the time I went out next I had built a stripping basket and acquired a Rio Outbound WF6F/I line. The heads on the Grand and the Outbound are actually pretty similar in taper and weight, but they're designed to be used quite differently. With a standard line, the idea is to aerialize the first 20-30' or so then go from there, depending on what you want to do with the cast. From what I've found, the Outbound is designed to aerialize the whole 37.5' head then shoot the thin running line as far as you can. That's easy to do because the head and the running line are different colors. The whole head of the Outbound weighs about as much as the first 30' of a 7 or even 8wt line. That's probably why they designed the CC as a stiffer rod than the SD. They wanted a rod that would achieve maximum shooting distance with 35-40' of line aerialized.

    So there it is; Loomis CC 6wt, Rio Outbound Intermediate, stripping basket. I've been out with it several times and have come to understand how to best use it. If the wind isn't horrible, I can routinely cast that rig 70-80' (or until the first tangle in the running line -- haven't quite figured that out yet.) That's my go-to setup.
     
  11. Stonefish

    Stonefish Triploid, Humpy & Seaplane Hater

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    NB Ken,
    Both your Loomis rods are great. That CC will be a excellent beach stick.
     
  12. Randy Lindahl

    Randy Lindahl Member

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    Cliffside!!!...I'm on Hansville Rd 1/4 north of Eglon
     
  13. hendersonbaylocal

    hendersonbaylocal Member

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    I have a couple rods I fish regularly on the sound, but I'd say my go-to rod is my 5wt. Here's the lineup:

    10' 4wt Sage XP with a clear intermediate - for cutthroat and rezzies on the nice glassy days from the boat
    9.5' 5wt TFO Pro with outbound floater - all around kickass rod
    10' 6wt Rainshadow with outbound floater - for silvers off the beach
     
  14. Pieter Salverda

    Pieter Salverda Member

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    9'0 Sage Launch 8 wt. This is also my Steelhead rod. It has served me very well thus far though is a tad overkill sometimes. I think a 6wt would be perfect, but I figured I would rather have too much than too little rod.
     
  15. Philster

    Philster Active Member

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    That's my main rod for all things 6wt. It doesn't hold up to rigors of salt like an Xi does. Mine looks like crap, but it still fishes great!
     
  16. Ed Call

    Ed Call Mumbling Moderator Staff Member

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    Great input on my questions. I broke down and decided. I opted for a Redington RS4 10' 7wt. I got what I think is a good deal with a Redington CD 7/8 spooled with backing and an intermediate sink clear line. Reelflyrod.com great service. Now USPS must deliver and fast.
     
  17. Banzai

    Banzai FFing and VWs...Bugs & Bugs

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    My favorite rod is an old Garcia 8' IM6 2pc 5/6wt. I use a 4wt line on calm days and a 5wt on the rest. Moderate action to medium action and even slow action if I actually toss a 6wt with it. Next would be my Lami 1298 5wt 2 pc 9'er. with either an Airflo Ridgeline or SA Sharkskin it'll bomb out a cast into the wind. For the Silver and Blackmouth runs, it's my 10' 6wt 2pc Rainshadow I built on a RX7 blank. Lately I've been tossing a 7wt Airflo Accelerator floater with it. It'll definitely reach out and touch someone. For Chums off the beach i go for the Sage 8113 with a cut back 500 Skagit with an intermediate or floater 10' polyleader. And no, I don't have just one "go to" rod. :)
     
  18. Porter

    Porter Active Member

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    Have you ever tried the 10' 7 weight TCR?
     
  19. Denny

    Denny Active Member

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    I presume you're talking about general fishing for the Puget Sound area, for searun cutts and resident coho . . .

    Loomis GLX 6 wt. 9' (what Loomis now calls "Classic"). That rod rules. Weighs less than 3 ounces, has a medium stiff progressive action and generates terrific line speed. I can't say enough good things about that rod (I also have it in an 8 weight, 4 piece; the perfect all-around bonefish rod). I use this rod from the beach and the boat. Definitely the go-to rod.

    My second rod is a Sage 691-4 TCR, which I line up when fishing from the boat with an SA Streamer Express 250 gr. I can't believe how incredibly stout this rod is with it's small rod profile. I have an Airflo WF6F 40+, but it doesn't load this rod as well as it should. My next line will be a Streamer Express clear tip. I use this rod in the boat.

    My third rod which I take as an extra in the boat is a Sage 690-5SP. This is a very nice rod, and if it weren't for the GLX, this would be my go-to rod. A beach and boat rod.

    Finally, when fish are small (early season) and the weather conditions allow it and/or its euphausid time, I've started using a 5 weight Orvis Helios. A great rod; its super light, so far has been very durable, and will fire a line. In these same fishing conditions I occasionally use my old Sage 590SP+. It's a veteran and has some use (at least the reel seat shows it) and is really more of a 6 weight. Both a boat and beach rod, mostly beach.

    That Loomis GLX rocks! Oh, I already said that. That's OK, it's such a good rod, it deserves another mention.

    For chums, I use my GLX 8 weight and a TFO TiCr-X 8 wt. These sticks are those that I also use at Sekiu and Neah Bay (along with my Redington RS3 and RS4 nine weights . . . )
     
  20. Porter

    Porter Active Member

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    Does your GLX have a full wells?

    I remember seeing a mfg. built 4-piece 6 weight GL3 rod.....and wondered if they did it to for the GLX?
     

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