What Spring hatches do you carry?

Discussion in 'Fly Tying' started by powpow, Feb 7, 2012.

  1. powpow

    powpow Member

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    Hello,
    As Spring approaches it seems it is time to make room for the different stages in a Mayflie's life. I just starting tying flies about a year inlight of a biology class I took. I was looking for some advice on spring Mayflies when the hatch is on. What are some of the variations you tie for emergers, duns, and spinners?
    Thanks for reading.
     
  2. McNasty

    McNasty Canyon Lurker

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    i'd be interested in some answers on this as well. iv'e been tying up alot of emergers and dries in BWO and march brown colors
     
  3. WABOWMAN

    WABOWMAN Active Member

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    I have been tying for stillwaters.Your calibetes and mids.You cant forget the skawalas for the river too.The calibetes i tie as duns and emergers.the skawalas as nymphs and a few variations of drys.
     
  4. Preston

    Preston Active Member

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    Our most common stillwater mayfly is the Callibaetis, they hatch from early spring into fall on an almost daily basis. The nymph, emerger and dun (subimago) are the most important forms, while the spinner (imago) may become important at times (I've sometimes seen large trout at Lenice cruising around sipping spent Callibaetis spinners).

    Our most common moving-water mayflies in the spring are Blue-Winged Olives (Baetis spp.) and March Browns (Rhithrogena spp.). BWOs are prolific in the early spring and again in the fall and a couple of species of March Browns (R. Morrisoni, and R. Hageni) hatch through the summer.

    If you're interested in learning more about western mayflies and their imitations, I would recommend Western Mayfly Hatches, by Rick Hafele and Dave Hughes, the best available source of information for our western species. Here are some pictures of my Callibatis Series patterns.

    View attachment 48232 View attachment 48233 View attachment 48234 View attachment 48235
     
  5. kelvin

    kelvin Active Member

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    Preston those are beautiful
    what size are you tying those?
     
  6. tkww

    tkww Member

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    Not trying to speak for Preston, but they start larger (12/14) and get smaller as the season goes on (16/18). They can range from light tan or tan/grey to dark gray/brown. I think lighter versions are more common, but it really depends on the specifics of you water. I think gray or a gray/tan is a little more universal in E WA (this is my hunch/experiences, not based on a known fact). But again, it will vary by body of water and locale changes.

    Preston's other info is dead on--it usually is. :) By late spring/early summer, the Pale Morning Duns (PMDs) are often hatching on moving water. And Damselflies on lakes. But I don't really think of those as "spring," though I suppose they technically fall into that quarter on the calendar.
     
  7. Preston

    Preston Active Member

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    The emerger, dun and spinner are tied on standard length, size 14, dry fly hooks. I find this works pretty well throughout the season. The nymph is tied on a Tiemco 200R or 2312 (I like the straight eye).
     
  8. TD

    TD Active Member

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    Preston - may I ask what the tail and body material is that you used on the nymph pattern?
     
  9. Preston

    Preston Active Member

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    The tails and body of the nymph are marabou fibers, stripped off the quill. The tips of the fibers are tied in to form the tails then the remainder of the fibers are wrapped up the hook shank. In place, the secondary fibers look somewhat like the gills along the sides of the Callibaetis nymph's abdomen. Because of the fragility of the marabou fibers, I counter-wrap the abdomen with fine gold or silver wire.
     
  10. TD

    TD Active Member

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    Thank you. I really like the way the fibers stick out.
     

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