Where to start in PS?

Discussion in 'Saltwater' started by DeanHosh, Jan 24, 2007.

  1. DeanHosh

    DeanHosh New Member

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    Hi All,

    I am looking for suggestions from the "fab forum of saltiness."

    I live in Seattle proper and can go fishing on weekdays. Got a lightweight boat that can go about 10 miles RT from a launch. I have never fished for res. or SRC but have a 6wt with all the trimmings, can cast well and have fly fished for 20 years and salt water fished in PS for about 6.

    The Question is:

    Any suggestions on where to start? I want to concentrate on an area and learn it through the "ups and downs" of the tides.

    I can take a ferry to Bremerton and drive from there. Or drive from Seattle but prefer to fish not drive.

    (No assumption about revealing your fav area, but looking for more general areas like "Case inlet" or Hood Canal above Seabeck, or Discovery bay.

    Thanks in advance to all.

    Dean

    PS: If someone is looking for a person to fish with, I would be very happy to go with someone who would be willing to show the ropes.
     
  2. dominic7471

    dominic7471 Member

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    hey man.... good for you on coming to the salt water....

    General tips: get saltwater fly tying material. Get tube flies and clousers down. (shock and awes, f.f. herring.... etc. in colors like chartreuse, olive, black, brown and pink) you six weight will be fine. Get sinking line like the rio outbound is preferrable. then go to the south sound. never really fished the north puget sound but the sound seems to always do the best. I go to browns point alot and it seem to be pretty decent. And if you want a really good fishing spot try the narrows but its a drive and its worth it.

    Come down to browns point or just try around the sound off the beach or in your boat. All it really is is you find spots that work for you. Good luck man!!! :beer2:
     
  3. DeanHosh

    DeanHosh New Member

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    Thanks for the tips.

    I just got a Rio Outbound Intermediate. I figured my intermediate trout line in a DT was not really what I wanted. I have a lot of salt water tying stuff already I used for the tropics so I am looking good. I am starting to tie and from suggestions here keeping it sparse in general.

    Browns point sounds good but a bit urban. I was hoping for suggestions that are a bit more remote to take advantage of my non-working flexability.

    Thanks,

    Dean
     
  4. gigharborflyfisher

    gigharborflyfisher Native Trout Hunter

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    If you are looking for suggestions, for resident coho and cutthroat I like to concentrate on areas that have a point or other structure where the water gets moving a little bit. If you are looking for remote areas (less urbanized) the Hood Canal has A LOT of beaches you could explore. There is also plenty of great cuttie and rezzie water all over the South Sound (I can't speak for the North Sound).

    Slack tides are rarely good fishing, but I have been suprised by them a few times. Generally I do good on faster out goings or slower incomings but it really varies from beach to beach with some fishing better on different tides.

    For flies as said above clousers in colors like: pink, brown, tan, white, black, chartreuse, olive and plenty of other colors. Brown, black and olive have treated me best for cutthroat and pink, chartreuse, white and tan have treated me better for resident coho. Cutthroat really like snot darts for some reason. You will also want a good selection of more suggestive baitfish patterns representing sand lance, herring, ect. I like size 8 hooks as they are easier on the fish than larger hooks. If you are into top water fishing, gurglers and poppers/ sliders can be fun on floating lines.
     
  5. Les Johnson

    Les Johnson Les Johnson

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    I suggest that you seek out a recent edition of Northwest Fly Fishing and check out Leland Miyawaki's article on fishing Puget Sound. There is a map of more spots than you can fish in a year. At most of them you don't need a boat. At others there are boat launches.
    Good Fishing,
    Les Johnson
     
  6. DeanHosh

    DeanHosh New Member

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    Thanks Les,

    Turns out that issue is Summer 2006 and I would have to order it from the publisher for about $12. I might but seems likt a lot for one article, but maps are often well worth it.
    PS: I did find out that the entire FlyFishing Magazine is available through the Seattle Public Library on a per article basis, online in PDF format. Very cool. It is under Search-Databases- databaese & Websites- Magazines and Newspapers- Proquest - Publications

    PPS: I just found it at the king co library system. I will check it out.

    --Cheers,

    Dean
     

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