Winter backpacking. What do you bring?

Discussion in 'Camping, Hiking, Cooking' started by Tony the Trout, Dec 1, 2010.

  1. I do at least one winter backpacking trip every year. I'm already well versed in the essentials. What I'm wondering is what LUXERY items you bring (booze is obvious). I usually don't hike very far so a little wieght is ok. Thanks for the suggestions!

    Tony
     
  2. women if I can talk them into it ;)
    A thermos of coffee, pint of rum, and dry clothes
     
  3. Really good food, even if carrying it and the means to cook it is a bit cumbersome. Makes it worth it. Some really good comfortable footwear to get out of your hiking boots, change your socks and have comfortable feet after a long hike in. Adequate fire starter if you are going to be in an area where you can gather fire wood and have a fire. A good plan for what to do with your doo...not necessarily a luxury for you, but for whomever might be next...

    Have an awesome trip.
     
  4. a small propane stove and a tent with adequate ventalation so you dont freeze to death, a few hundred hand warmers might also be a good idea
     
  5. When camping on snow, the best thing you can do it carry a couple extra closed-cell foam pads (I like ThermaRest Z-Rests). Cover your tent floor with those, then toss on your standard 3-season Thermarest pad. Having the entire tent floor insulated will make those long, dark nights much more comfortable.
     
  6. A pee bottle.. Something like a WIDE mouthed gatorade bottle works best. Don't have to go out in the cold when you're stuck in the tent all night!
     
  7. iagree:clown:
     
  8. Essential gear even in the high country huts of BC or 10th Mt Colorado! Nothing worse than freezing your "kenobies" just for a piss.
     
  9. cutting the top off a gallon jug of milk works well to, then you have a nice handle and dont have to worry about overflow after drinking all that booze
     
  10. Gatorade bottle maybe. Old nalgene bottle well labeled so as not to be later used for human consumption maybe. Who the hell carries a gallon jug to piss in when they are backpacking? That is your luxury item? You are a strange dude Ryan Singh-Cundy!
     
  11. Use a three foot long three inch diameter piece of plastic tubing instead. 1- it's fun. 2- you won't spill in the tent and have to kill yourself to get over the shame of doing something like that.
     
  12. 3" diameter? Way too small!
     
  13. Mumbles - I think you're thinking about the wrong end my friend!
     
  14. Some good ideas. Thanks. I think the empty gatorade bottle is gonna make the list. Here are some of the things I like to bring on short winter hikes (in addition to booze):

    A few sticks of dry kindling
    A large fixed blade knife (for splitting kindling and found firewood survivor man style)
    An extra rain fly and some twine (string it up in the branches and it makes a dry place to cook and eat but much lighter than a tarp)
    Several hats (if one gets wet you always have a dry one)
    BOOZE
    Did I mention booze?

    Tony
     
  15. Tony, you can also get the small duraflame starter blocks for about a buck. I often will carry one, they are not very heavy, about the size of a deck of cards and can work wonders in a cold and wet environment to get some heat going. One of those little cable "saws" with key rings on the ends also might help right size some firewood if you are in a place where wood is available and gathering is an option. Hope you have a fun trip.
     
  16. I'm a big fan of packing all my clothes in ziplock bags - everything stays nice and dry, especially when I'm digging around in my pack with wet gloves. Also - I bring plenty of extra batteries for my headlamp.

    One trick I always do right before I hop in my sleeping bag when winter camping is to boil a pot of water, pour it into a Nalgene bottle, seal it tight, and then toss it in the foot of my sleeping bag to keep my feet warm while I fall asleep. Don't try this with your pee bottle, no matter how good of an idea it seems at the time!
     
  17. I just have to chime in to let everyone know not to do this with a rock from a fire ring. Some kid did this when I was a boy scout and it burn his feet horribly. He feel asleep and when he woke it was too late to avoid injury.

    starting a fire has always been a problem for me in the snow. I started taking a back-up of a roadside flare and a bike inner tube. The bike tube is for emergencies only, but it will burn long and hot enough to start just about anything. Carrying a camp hatchet is heavy, but it's a practically a must for splitting wood when everything is seemingly wet.

    Most of the time I just give up on fire in the snow. I take a fresh canister of fuel and use the jet boil to warm up water for warmth.
     
  18. WHISPELIGHT + FULL REPAIR KIT
    TELEMARK SKIS + SLED
    SHOVEL + AVVY GEAR
    WARM BAG + SINGLE WALL SHELTER DIG IN AND COVER THE TOP OF THE SHELTER
    FULL LENGTH THERAMREST
    SYNTHETIC INSULATING LAYERS
    DRY CLOTHING
    BACON
    PEE BOTTLE
    BOOTIES + OVER BOOTS
    GLOVES
    MAP
    BACON (IT STAYS FROZEN!)
     
  19. QUIGLOO LIVING

    [​IMG]
     

Share This Page