Wirehaired Griffon

Discussion in 'Cast & Blast' started by Mike McAvoy, Mar 19, 2009.

  1. Mike McAvoy olddog22202

    Posts: 58
    Cathlamet, WA and Sunny AZ
    Ratings: +0 / 0
    I've been out of the hunting scene for lots of years but it calls again. Does anyone use the Griffon or have any experience with the breed? I am in my mid 60's, a foot hunter, probably mostly grouse, duck. My ideal dog would have an off switch as most of the time it probably will be keeping my feet warm or riding around with me.
    Thanks
    Mike
  2. Roper Idiot Savant

    Posts: 4,285
    Glenraven Ranch
    Ratings: +770 / 1
    Hello Mike, Don't know much about WPG, but if you log onto the Upland Journal forum there are lots of owners that can give you great feedback.

    Take care, Roper
  3. Mike McAvoy olddog22202

    Posts: 58
    Cathlamet, WA and Sunny AZ
    Ratings: +0 / 0
    Hey Roper,
    I appreciate the tip.
    Thanks
    Mike
  4. D3Smartie Active Member

    Posts: 1,987
    WA
    Ratings: +4 / 0
    I'd go with a lab :)
  5. Leroy Laviolet Aint no nookie like chinookie

    Posts: 995
    do'n it 4 the chinookie
    Ratings: +0 / 0
    I second that emotion... Don't get any better!
  6. Chukar Spey I'll take Chukar & Steelhead all day, every day!

    Posts: 107
    Nampa, ID
    Ratings: +0 / 0
    Depending on the type of upland hunting you'll be doing...

    Of the Brittanys that I have hunted over (3 or 4) all were very well mannered and were GREAT in house dogs. The other is a Vizla, another good family/bird mix. As the others have said, ole reliable in the Labs.

    I second Upland Journal's forum. GREAT bunch of guys.
  7. Mike McAvoy olddog22202

    Posts: 58
    Cathlamet, WA and Sunny AZ
    Ratings: +0 / 0
    thanks for the tips, guys. I too like the labs and the Britts but ..... I remember the extra jolt I used to get when the dog would point the bird giving me more time to mull over the more creative ways I could let the dog down upon the flush when I was supposed to do my part. There aren't any bad bird dogs as I remember but my yen is for a calm pointing dog ..... perhaps that is an oxymoron?
    Mike Mc
  8. Joe Dirt Member

    Posts: 38
    Blaine wa.
    Ratings: +3 / 0
    I have hunted with pointers and setters all my life. I have a buddy that is into the WHG he loves them, very calm good hunters great family dogs. He shows his AKC as well with great success. I think for a guy that wants a pal and a hunter you cant go wrong with a WHG. I have been chasing English Pointers and Setters all my life and think it may be time to get one myself.

    Good luck and good hunting.:thumb:
  9. D3Smartie Active Member

    Posts: 1,987
    WA
    Ratings: +4 / 0
    ok... a pointing lab. :)
  10. bushwacker Member

    Posts: 159
    Shoreline, WA
    Ratings: +3 / 0
    I'm a Brittany guy and will probably remain so, but I have been intrigued with the Griffon's retreiving ability. Most pointing dogs are single coated (except for Pointing Labs) and while some are proported to be water dogs, they can't handle cold weather. It's said that Griffons can handle cold water. If true, that's a perfect combination. A pointer and retreiver in the same package. However, I don't recall encountering any in my years of duck hunting.

    That said, the Griffons I've seen are great looking, friendly, affecionate dogs. There's nothing better than having both a hunting companion and household pet. I think you are on the right track.
  11. Mr56Jeep Because I can

    Posts: 30
    Puyallup, WA
    Ratings: +0 / 0

    iagree

    +1 on the pointing lab.... Sometimes called a pausing lab by the pointer guys. Probably the best bet for your situation.

    You won't be able to turn a real upland dog off when you want that nice lap dog if you don't run the crud out of it on a regular basis.
  12. Itchy Dog Some call me Kirk Werner

    Posts: 3,729
    Doo-vall
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  13. griffon New Member

    Posts: 11
    Bellingham, WA
    Ratings: +0 / 0
    Olddog,

    I've owned two griffons and hunted over several others. I have also been a member of the Wirehaired Pointing Griffon Club of America for many years, judging in their dog tests which are required to evaluate all puppies from their breeding program. The clubs breeding program is not for everyone but they consistently produce some very nice all around dogs. I have hunted pheasants, grouse, quail, chukar, ptarmigan, ducks and geese with my dogs and both of mine have more than met my expectation in the field and as a household member. I think they're great dogs.

    Steve

    Sorry my one and only post is about dogs and not FF.
  14. Mike McAvoy olddog22202

    Posts: 58
    Cathlamet, WA and Sunny AZ
    Ratings: +0 / 0
    Appreciate all the feedback ..... those pointing labs are pretty neat aren't they? ... have not seen many of them but all were chocolates that I remember ... great combination dogs.

    I am still on a quest for a versatile hunting dog though. I have blundered into maybe an opportunity that you might have opinions about.

    A friend hunts with ES. We were talking dogs while waiting for salmon to hit (they didn't) and when I mentioned Griffons he told me his son in law had two ( 1 & 5 y/o) and were considering getting a new home for the one year old. That would leave them with a older dog, two little kids and that was enough fun apparently.

    I talked to the fellow and will see the dog this week. He is 1, from a kennel that both hunts and shows, is well mannered, house trained but is still in the puppy stage. Neither of their dogs have ever been hunting or encouraged to do so but were bought for the purpose of hunting. ... we all can remember those days!

    The dog is not out of the WPGCA but I dont know the kennel yet or if it is NAVHDA breeding/testing .....

    My question, given the lack of any early introduction to birds, water, etc, is it too big a risk to take a 1 year old dog and hope the genes will kick in?

    This is an whole male dog. I have no kids about anymore and a couple of fixed herding Aussies- females.

    Mike
  15. griffon New Member

    Posts: 11
    Bellingham, WA
    Ratings: +0 / 0
    I've had the opportunity to see several griffons at one year of age which had been under exposed. Their lack of exposure was either due to injury or illness with the dog or the owner. If the dog has the genetics and a stable temperment they can be brought along. You can certainly make up for the lack of bird exposure but I would want to evaluate his exposure and therefore comfort to other things such as other dogs, people, cover and water. If you can, take the dog out into a field (with the owner) and watch the dog work some cover. Ask the owner not to say anything to the dog. You can tell a lot just by watching a dog as long as it is free from any verbal influences from the owner. Just start walking. I wouldn't expect much but you want to evaluate how independent the dog is and how comfortable he is in the field. Does he just walk at the owner's side or does his nose take him off searching, even if only a short distance off. Is he timid or fearful? Does he run off wild? If the dog moves out at all on its own, change direction without calling the dog. Does he ignore the owner completely, run to his side or swing around in front of him and continue searching? Could be the natural ability and potential are there. It really depends on how much you want to put into it from that point on.

    Good luck.
  16. Mike McAvoy olddog22202

    Posts: 58
    Cathlamet, WA and Sunny AZ
    Ratings: +0 / 0
    Griffon
    I have a perfect spot in mind to run the dog and see as you say how he does without being urged to hunt or ?????? I hope this comes off in an hour or so and also hope this guy dives into the cover and roots around like he should.

    Also, Roper put me onto a Spinone up for adoption that would be perfect as he is supposedly steady on point, 5 y.o, etc ...... I think I got there a little too late though .... we'll see.
  17. Jerry Arlington Member

    Posts: 130
    Grandview, WA, USA.
    Ratings: +0 / 0
    I couldn't hunt over anything that ugly and I don't ride mules for the same reason. However, some are really good walking bird dogs theat will double as a retriever in the water. If he has good hunting bloodlines his age will not be a problem, however, did I hear AKC shows? If so that would worry me, I am not a big dual dog person. Too many breeds have been screwed up by show people. Dual purpose dogs, show and field, are usually mediocre in both.

    Jerry Arlington
  18. Mike McAvoy olddog22202

    Posts: 58
    Cathlamet, WA and Sunny AZ
    Ratings: +0 / 0
  19. sean_k Active Member

    Posts: 457
    Spanaway Wa.
    Ratings: +25 / 0
    I completely disaagree I have two gsp and they are very easy to calm down and sit still at any time. They are both in their prime right now and both bahave better than most other dogs I have seen. A great dog, and a dog that listens is a product of good training, so if you teach a dog there is a time for play and a time to just chill out then they will comply whole heartedly because as wild dogs our house broken, sleeping in the same bed, beggin for attention dogs still have pack instincts and understand a hierarchy and you have to be at the top of it or they wont respect you and yes they will runamock.
  20. Kaari White Active Member

    Posts: 826
    Seattle, WA
    Ratings: +31 / 0
    I think all he was saying was that a tired dog is a better housepet. Even with all the training in the world, if they don't get ample exercise, most bird dogs get pretty stir crazy.

    My lab is probably sleeping on my bed at this very moment, but when I get home he'll defiinitely be ready for some outside playtime.