WT rod for Steelhead and Salmon??

Discussion in 'Steelhead' started by J Nordwell, Dec 5, 2006.

  1. I'm looking at my frist fly rod for steelahead and salmon. I've been told 7 wt by a few people and then was told 8 wt just incase I hook into a salmon, Then I was told 8 wt for steelhead and a 10 wt for salmon. Since I plan on buying 1 rod should I get a 8wt or a 9 wt?? Thanks for the help. I'm looking at getting a TFO rod in either a 2 or a 4 piece. A good reel maybe a Orvis mig arbor and a multi tip fly line. Does this sound about right??? Thanks
    Josh
     
  2. A 7 or 8 weight is ideal for steelhead, coho, and Pink Salmon. An 8 is sometimes a little light for chum salmon, especially the large ones we get in Washington. An 8 weight is too light for chinook, a 10 or 11 would be better suited for that large of fish. You'll need to determine what species you're most likely to target/encounter and base the rod weight accordingly.
     
  3. Based on where you live, you can realistically fish for steelhead 12 months and maybe 3 months for chinook. If you are only going to get one rod, get the 8 weight and if you hook a big chinook, well, you can probably get it in with the 8 but if you bust the rod, that’s what TFO’s life time warranty is for :)
     
  4. An 8 will serve you well for WA/OR Fishing....just one suggestion..Get the four piece...you will be glad you did....Sounds like a good set-up :)
     
  5. Why the 4 piece?? I really don't know any where to really do some backpacking for steelhead at least not off hand. The 4 piece package is about 60 bucks more then the 2 piece. I'm still up in the air. The package is the rod, reel,line,backing and a rod tube. 440 bucks. Is this a good deal??? The 2 piece deal is like 370. Thanks for the help.
    Josh
     
  6. Hey Josh,

    Go cast those rods-- the 2 pc rod (Signature series) has a much different action than the 4pc (either the Pro or TiCr series). You'll like a 4pc rod, they're just more convenient overall. It's not just the number of pieces you're considering here, it's the actual feel of the rod. I find that faster rods like the TiCr make it easier for me to cast heavy sink-tips and fight bigger fish.
     
  7. Josh,

    Most experienced anglers will agree that an 8 wt is the best all around steelhead fly rod if you can have only one rod. It will serve for salmon so long as you understand you will be undergunned for chinook.

    I always preferred two piece rods, but the 4 piece one nowadays are very good, and with many, you can't tell the difference from a 2 piece. I've been traveling for a trip or two the last few years, and 4 piece are much better for air travel.

    I'm not familiar with the pricing for the gear you describe, so I have no opinion about how good a deal it is.

    Sincerely,

    Salmo g.
     
  8. The guides I fished Tarpon with in Belize used the 4 piece, even though they were fishing from boats. I asked about that, and the answer had to do with shipping, but my guide felt there was no drawback to the 4 piece.

    BTW, I chose 9'9" 3pc 8 wt for my latest steelhead/slamon rod. I like it...
     
  9. I really like my 9'6 8wt for winter steelhead, coho and chum salmon. I think for throwing sink tips, long casts, mending, and all the other things that go along with fishing anadromous fish on the west coat, the extra sink inches is a benefit. you may want to look into that.
     
  10. All my older rods are 2 or 3 piece, but over time are being replaced with 4-pc rods. Just so much more convenient to store or carry, whether on a plane, in a back pack or on a trail bike. It's worth the $60 bucks to me, though there are lots of great deals on ebay for 2 pc rods.

    The 8 wt is the happy medium for winter steelhead and small salmon, plus it is the rod weight of choice if you're ever looking at chasing bonefish.
     
  11. If you have a 5wt, go for the 7wt. I think 7 is enough for all but record sized SH and it's a great SRC beach rod.
    If you have a 6wt, go for the 8wt. It's the classic SH size and not so big you'll wear your arm out. Plus, Jim is right, it doubles as a great tropic rod. And thats why you want a 4 piece. Plus the fact that you can carry it streamside "folded" in half.
    Am taking the 8 to the tropics next week! (Gloating here.)
     

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