Yakima River Report Anyone???

Discussion in 'Fly Fishing Forum' started by troutman101, Jul 22, 2002.

  1. troutman101

    troutman101 Member

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    Headed out to the River from Friday through Sunday. We plan on doing a number of different stretches depending on circumstances. Did anyone go out this weekend and fish? If so, did you catch fish? What bugs were they eating? How is the river colors and levels?

    I normally just go and find out for myself but man it is nice to have good beta. It sure is nice having folks to ask.

    I was thinking of the hopper/stones and PMD's and yellow sally's. Maybe with some caddis mixed in for the evening. Any suggestions?
     
  2. Greg Moore

    Greg Moore New Member

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    Fished (on foot) yesterday (from 3:30 - 8:30p.m. with a break for 1 hour to stop in at Red's for a rest, a little chat with Steve, the new owner of Red's and an ice cream). The flow was around 3850-3900. Clarity was good - 4-5 feet. Some of the places that I was able to get to last week at 3200-3500cfs weren't available but I could still get to most places I fish. Didn't see many fish rising and I caught all my fish (9) on a double nymph rig ( a larger double bead head prince on top and a smaller pheasant tail as the dropper). All the fish were 8" rainbows. There weren't that many drift boats / rafts working down the river but the inner tubers were none stop! Very little wind and the air temp was bearable. The water temp was very refreshing.

    Had a guide, with two clients in the boat, fish right up on me and then claim they didn't see me but the guide never pulled back when he did see me and they continued to fish through m the water I was working and going to work downstream as he appologized to me. I'm sure he only cared about the people who were paying him. This was the 2nd time in a row that a drift boat has done that to me. Wade fishermen only have a few stretches when the river is this high to try to catch fish and the drift boats have the rest of the river! It would be nice to see a little courtesy from one of these paid "professionals(?)".

    Call Steve at Red's (509)929-1802 or visit his web site for updated flows and weather http://www.redsflyshop.com/
    He keeps constant hours so he's very reliable!

    Good Luck :THUMBSUP


    Greg
     
  3. alpinetrout

    alpinetrout Banned or Parked

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    I fished downstream from MM18 from 11-12:30 saturday on my way to the Gorge. After talking to Jack at the Evening Hatch, it sounded like midday fishing would be a write-off, but I saw a pod of fish rising and ended up catching 4 in the short time I was there. I couldn't tell what the fish were feeding on, but caught all of them on a #14 Adams. I had tried hoppers and PMD's with no luck, so decided to go with something more general purpose.
     
  4. troutman101

    troutman101 Member

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    Thanks! I know how you feel about the guides. I used to be one until I found out how poor the ethics are with guiding. I have seen one of the Yakima guides drop a chain anchor in fast water and drag 30 feet to a slamming stop. Almost knocked the client out of the boat. On another occasion in the canyon, I found a pod of rising trout about 100 feet upstream from a guide and his client eating lunch on shore. After catching half a dozen fish the guide proceeded to tell us that we were invading his territory and that we were fishing over his water. I just looked over to him and said,"If you aren't in the go**amn water, it ain't your hole, your hatch, or your fish. This isn't your go**amn river!"

    Needless to say, there have been a few problems with the guides exploiting the river. Fortunately, it is easy to avoid the guides and still have a good day of fishing. My advise is to keep some rocks in your fishing vest and if they get too close, just start chuckin. It is always too late to tell them and they don't care anyways. Otherwise, they wouldn't be so close in the first place.

    Thanks for the good info. We will most likely try the canyon only because of the wonderful scenery. And the fact that the hillside is nice too. :TONGUE
     
  5. NewToSport

    NewToSport Member

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    What is a PMD?
     
  6. Scott Salzer

    Scott Salzer previously micro brew

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    Pale morning dun.
     
  7. ray helaers

    ray helaers New Member

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    The pale morning dun is a mayfly (ephemerella infrequens?) that hatches on the Yakima in June and July, and sporadically into August (probably starting to peter out about now). The duns have a yellowish body and white wings, and are about a size #16. They tend to emerge from about 11:30 AM to about 2:30 PM, and a hatch can last from 30 minutes to a couple of hours. It can be one of the better hatches on the Yak, if you catch it right. PMD parachutes, comparaduns, and sparkle duns are good dryfly imitations.

    While the duns are light, the nymphs are actually dark brown. A pheasant tail is an excellent nymph imitation, and so is a flashback. Emerger and cripple imitations should acknowledge the color change from nymph to dun, with the back half of the body and/or shuck being dark brown.
     
  8. troutman101

    troutman101 Member

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    Ray,

    Don't forget that you aren't a scientist. Even though there is a bunch of Ephemerella Infrequens in the Western U.S., in Washington there is such a mix that it is better to just call em P.M.D.'s. Even Baetis are not always Baetis.
    I am not trying to be a stinker, just don't want folks to get confused with all the damn Latin.

    Presentation and then...
    1st size

    2nd silloette (sp?)

    3rd color

    4th taste
     
  9. Old Man

    Old Man Just an Old Man

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    I might be old---but I'm good.

    After reading this post. How do they taste? :DUNNO
     
  10. troutman101

    troutman101 Member

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    A little tastier than scuds but much more crunchy. I still like the taste of skwalas though.
     
  11. ray helaers

    ray helaers New Member

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    Thanks. I forgot I wasn't a scientist. (I did put in the question mark to acknowledge what I think is your point, that I don't necessarily know what I'm talking about.)

    However, I'm not sure I agree with the implication that a little working knowledge of aquatic entymology (or latin for that matter) is a bad thing, or superfulous to angling. Yes, when bugs are hatching I can tell what color, shape, and size they are, and maybe that's all I ned to know. But if I go to a little trouble to figure out what the little critter might actually be, then I might learn some things about its lifecycle, its habitats, and its habits that might help me predict when and where else I might find it hatching again, or how, when, and where to fish a fly that imitates its nymph when I don't have it to look at. For instance a cursory study of "fisherman's entymology" taught me that callibaetis nymphs have the interesting habit of swimming up and down through the water column for an hour or so prior to emergence. That little tidbit led to a simple technique for fishing a callibaetis soft-hackle nymph during the late mornings before any hatch starts (a sink-tip line, short casts, a slowish, steady raising and lowering of the rod tip) that has put a lot of Chopaka bruisers on the stripping apron. I'm not sure your formula would have taken me there. It works for a lot of mayflies, caddis, and stoneflies. Knowing if a particular mayfly is a swimming, crawling, clinging, or burrowing nymph might have particular implicatins for my fishing and my fly-tying, as would knowing if a caddis spends its larval stage as a case-builder or free swimming, or knowing that a particular stonefly nymph migrates towards edge-habitats during the several weeks prior to emergence.

    Not to mention that while a little knowledge is often a dangerous thing, it can be entertaining for its own sake, and in this case the stakes are relatively low. I for one am interested in knowing as much as I can about the natural world I've decided to play in. If I don't get it exactly right every time, well I'm not a scientist.

    I know that the pendulum has swung from the "scientific" angling of the late 70s and 80s, and it's hip to be a "presentationist" these days. It's an appealing ideology, with a great deal of aw shucks poetry going for it. But out at its edge, it's just as vulnerable to accusations of snobbery as the taxonomical excesses of the past. Me, I guess I'm something of a moderate arguing for detente.
     
  12. troutman101

    troutman101 Member

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    You know, I think we might have a lot in common. It sounds like a real case of passion and desire for catching fish. It has taken me years to figure all that stuff out just so I knew it. Now I realize that most of the time if I ain't catching fish, it is simply because I am still very ignorant of their environment. Not because they aren't biting. I could read every book in my library of flyfishing and trout biology and entomology and ecology and hydrology and trout psychology and still end up fishless. I saw it happen to the best of them. It happens to me every year!

    Ray, you can cast from the front of my boat any time. If you happen to be on the Yakima next weekend, look for the red Bronco and a 14' lavro. There will be plenty of beer waiting for you in the cooler.

    Tony
     
  13. ray helaers

    ray helaers New Member

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    Well I'll say this, Tony. You know how to win a debate. :WINK

    Your points are well taken. I take getting skunked or not doing well badly because I understand that I can never blame it on the fish. It's always something that I've left out. We're talking about an animal that has to take in enough calories to support itself in a dynamic environment by eating organisms barely larger than plankton. They are almost never "off the bite." On the other hand, all the knowledge I can cram into myself, from books or experience, or the pretty flies I tie or the fancy casts I throw are often no substitutes for (or at least inadequate without) touch or intuition or luck or whatever you want to call it. I often wind up thinking of myself as a guy who was fishing like someone who ought to have caught more fish. Then again, the books and the videos and the crackpot theories and the fevered experiments at the vise and all the stream time are all part of the zen appeal of taking part in an exercise that can never be completely mastered. It will always be capable of cuffing me about the ears, and it will never get boring.

    Yeah, maybe I'll take you up on the kind offer, or offer you a lift myself. Keep an eye out for an old blue tub of an '88 Lavro with yellow oars. I hardly ever mind rowing to watch good angling, and I never mind doing it to listen to good conversation.
     
  14. mat1226

    mat1226 Active Member

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    Great dialogue ray and troutman. Educational to us all and another great example of what makes this forum unique in education and courtesy. Thanks.


    Mark
     

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