Yellowstone trip planning

Discussion in 'Fly Fishing Forum' started by darik, Dec 12, 2006.

  1. TWD Travis

    Posts: 201
    Kirkland, WA
    Ratings: +0 / 0
    Bill is dead on, I can't imagine taking any kids into the canyons. The madison would be ideal for kids on a float below quake lake. I think swinging nymphs on the firehole in June would produce also (try shallow riffles). I like the Gibbon advice but think the access by Mammoth is much better.

    The bugs were ferocious this past year! August makes for less bugs but the fishing gets much more difficult because you are primarily looking at terrestrails.

    O' yeah, its the Gardner ... the Gibbon is pretty tough fishing in my opinion ... flat water for small, smart fish
  2. Bill Reed New Member

    Posts: 205
    Fort Collins, Colorado
    Ratings: +0 / 0
    Sorry, knew it was one of those G rivers, but it ain't the Gibbon, it's the Gardner, as LFC pointed out.:eek:
  3. OhioOutdoorsman New Member

    Posts: 160
    Akron, OH
    Ratings: +0 / 0
    Took a week long trip to yellowstone this past september and I was surprised by the fishing. The Firehole, Gardiner, Gibbon, and Gallatian were getting pounded by fly-fisherman and this was the off-season. Combine that with barbless hook regs it made for some tough fishing. My wife was just learning and it was not a good place to learn.

    I did find some solitude on some smaller brookie streams and the fish were a bit more eager.....I would try their.....their are some youth only sections (drawing a blank where) but I would ASK someone local at a fly shop. Buying something tends to loosen their lips. I highly recomend richard parks' book. This compliments the matthews book nicely and has much more detailed and IMO more accurate information (the two books often have conflicting information).

    The Yellowstone fishing culture is pretty unique. You have a large group of tourists and a small group of local fisherman in the know. Most of the locals are tight-lipped about where to fish or worse yet give false info to misdirect the masses.
  4. Longs for Cutts Member

    Posts: 337
    Gardiner, MT (formerly Bellingham)
    Ratings: +15 / 0
    September is actually our peak month. About four years ago there was a rash of articles proclaiming how fall in Yellowstone was uncrowded, so now fall is no longer uncrowded. In addition, it tends to be the period when the "serious" fishermen come, as opposed to people on vacation with their families who happen to go fishing. It's also the worst time to learn to fly fish in the area (except the offseason), because most brook trout in the Gardner system jet upstream to the Fawn Creek area to spawn and because most cutts in easily accessable streams will have been caught 10 times already and are also feeding more slowly and selectively than in July or August. Labor Day until the equinox storm (we usually get a rain/snow storm within 3-4 days either side of the equinox) is my LEAST favorite period to fish during the high season. October or August are much better.
  5. OhioOutdoorsman New Member

    Posts: 160
    Akron, OH
    Ratings: +0 / 0
    This is the type of local info i'm talking about. Many of the mag/guidebooks will tell you the opposite. We enjoyed our trip the last week in September immensly. I fished several easily accesible locations of the Gardiner that were teeming with brook trout but were tough to catch because they were spawning. This is where I would go with kids in the summer of the limited places that I went.

    I had a guide take us to spot that the Matthews book said was devoid of fish that time of year. Multiple 14-16" cuts caught in a dramatic backcountry setting proved otherwise.
  6. NShorBrookie Mud Duck

    Posts: 22
    Duluth, MN
    Ratings: +0 / 0
    I fished Pebble Creek and Soda Butte Creek (upstream from the confluence of Pebble and Soda Butte) the first week of July last year and the cutts were pretty eager to hit almost any dry fly I threw at them. That's the only experience I have on those streams, but if those were typical days, she might be able to get into a good size cutt on just about any dry fly. It's small water with east wading and a lot of casting room. Hope you guys have fun.

    JJ
  7. Longs for Cutts Member

    Posts: 337
    Gardiner, MT (formerly Bellingham)
    Ratings: +15 / 0
    Those are not typical days. Early July is hit or miss on those streams --that's right in the timeframe in which they become fishable. A week later those fish become a lot smarter, and a lot more heavily-pressured. There's also a chance you were inadvertantly (I hope) targeting spawners, as some fish from the lower part of Round Prairie enter lower Pebble Creek to spawn.