youngster getting better

Discussion in 'Fly Tying' started by Fly Flinger Jr, Sep 5, 2008.

  1. Fly Flinger Jr

    Fly Flinger Jr New Member

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    high i am 14 years old and last chirstmas i got down to bussiness and whipped up a bunch of caddis, and little dun's, and buggers. i was wondering if there are any other quick and easy to learn flies i should give a shot. also what do you all think the best caddis color is for some trout. hey thanks guys
     
  2. P-FITZ98

    P-FITZ98 Member

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    Good to see younger gen. getting into it.What type of fishing do you plan to do? Lakes? Rivers? There are alot of productive patterns to tie for either that are easy,will catch fish, and make you more confident to try more difficult patterns.
     
  3. scottflycst

    scottflycst Active Member

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    J.R.,
    Asa rule of thumb, match the bottom of the lake or river you plan on fishing with your caddis and that will be a great place to start. If you don't already have a copy of "Western Hatches" by Hafele (sp?) get one and that will help you make an accurate decision because all insects that trout eat are seasonal. Season and body of water you fish will the larger determining factors of fly choice. Caddis come in different colors during the warm summer months ( spring thru fall) and color is important when the fish are keyed in on them. More importantly however, is the fisherman needs to know which species to expect on the water you're planning to fish. Caddis are fun to learn and fish. They are an important food source to many of our trout. A few good authors to read on this subject are Dave Hughes and the late Gary LaFontaine.
    The up coming winter would be a great time to do a basic study on caddis and tie several patterns for next summer. There are many on this board, me included, who would gladly share successful patterns with you. Also check the gallery because not too long ago there was a great caddis swap and you can see some of the good local patterns.
    Good luck and keep us informed on your progress!
     
  4. Calvin1

    Calvin1 Member

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    Now that you've got some basic dries and a streamer or two, how about some nymphs. Some straightforward patterns would include the pheasant tail and a gold ribbed hair's ear.
     
  5. David Prutsman

    David Prutsman All men are equal before fish

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    I'm a big fan of generic patterns which could be mistaken for a variety of food forms but never represents just a single source; whereas imitative patterns focus on representing very specific insects and their respective lifecycles. I find generic patterns are generally faster and easier ties than imitative, and because they cover a broad spectrum of fishing situations, I don't need as many fly boxes. Buggers, bunny leaches, stimulators, copper johns, snocones, elk hair caddis and parachute adams in varied sizes and colors would be a great start.

    david
     
  6. flytyerboy95

    flytyerboy95 Future fly fishing guide

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    sup man im thirteen and been tying almost two years all the stuff david listed are great beginner stuff
     

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