Your favorite sculpin pattern

Discussion in 'Fly Tying' started by ganglyangler, Jul 26, 2013.

  1. Jack Devlin

    Jack Devlin Active Member

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    Muddler type patterns still work for me. Then again, I'm old fashioned.
    Jack
     
  2. Jack Devlin

    Jack Devlin Active Member

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    Jim,
    I am also a fan of the Rolled Muddler and I particularly enjoy tying it as close to the original pattern as possible i.e. the arrow shaped head and the little bit of red thread (gills) showing behind the head.
    An all time great pattern.
    Keep in mind that Tom Murray, the fly's originator, intended the fly to be an imitation of saltwater beach sticklebacks and not sculpin. But, who is to say what a Sea-run sees when it nails one!
    Jack
     
  3. Sawyer

    Sawyer Active Member

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    So what I'm taking from this is, you don't need a sculpin that will sink to the bottom. And a Muddler minnow on a sinking line would probably do the trick in less than 6 feet of water?
    The other thing is, from what I've read is Chester Allan catches SRC in Muddlers regularly
     
  4. cnnorgil

    cnnorgil Member

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    Ive used the fly and Alaska, Washington and Idaho and it's my go to sculpin pattern anywhere!
     
  5. Philster

    Philster Active Member

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    It's hard to beat a properly sized unweighted wooly bugger, with a split just up the tippet. Woolies are some of the best sculpin and craw patterns. Plus they cast so much easier than the realistic patterns. Cast quartering upstream with a floating line and a long leader to get near the bottom. Manage your line and let the fly drift with periodic short quick strips. The shot, as much as you need to get down, up the tippet (2 or 3 inches) gives it great action. I never weighted my buggers. put the weight on the leader.
     

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