Inflatable Kayaks

#16
I don't really care what the boats are called. I this is the kind of craft in am interested in.
I walked that Creek at Ohanapecosh this summer and thought that creekers would have a blast there. To much for me, but the Rapids in schnapps pics would be fun.
I will check them out I have always been a aire fan and have owned a pontoon and raft that they made and was very impressed.
Jesse
 

Ed Call

Well-Known Member
#17
I know you are keen on inflatables. However, note that an inflatable boat is heavy, bulky, a pain to inflate and deflate; and if you want to do it single, no fun at all, which has to do with balance issues. Compared to a rigid craft, the inflatable has several more headaches to contend with. We haven't gotten to the matter of bladder integrity yet.

My son has one (two-man, even) and took it out once. I seriously doubt the mass--a half-closet worth, and twice the bulk of the original--will be inflated again.
What craft and is he selling? If so, please connect his dot and mine!
 

Jerry Daschofsky

Moderator
Staff member
#18
I know you are keen on inflatables. However, note that an inflatable boat is heavy, bulky, a pain to inflate and deflate; and if you want to do it single, no fun at all, which has to do with balance issues. Compared to a rigid craft, the inflatable has several more headaches to contend with. We haven't gotten to the matter of bladder integrity yet.

My son has one (two-man, even) and took it out once. I seriously doubt the mass--a half-closet worth, and twice the bulk of the original--will be inflated again.
I TOTALLY disagree with everything you said. He must've bought a cheap Sevylor one. I have the Outcast Powerdrifter (made by Aire) and love it to death. I bought it to replace a hard shell kayak. I've used it on lakes and rivers in all its configurations. Can't rave enough about it.
 

Jerry Daschofsky

Moderator
Staff member
#22
I looked at the power drifter but I would rather have a completely frameless boat. And the hard floor is better for what I want. I really need about 6 boats.
Jesse
You can use this without a frame. I pull frame out and use a padded stadium seat in it with a standard kayak paddle. This is the older model with hard foam floor. I'm fat and can safely stand and floor is solid under foot. The last ones they made with inflatable floor I heard weren't as solid, of course.
@Jerry Daschofsky Will you PLEASE stop posting porn?! You know that I do not have one of these and have no will power, LOL!
You love it and you know it!
 

hbmcc

Active Member
#24
Did I incite Jesse enough? Did he get one yet? Need more sales pitch? Let's do it. I'm not crispy enough, according to @Shapp.

Let's hit Jerry and his porn.... Tell me, when you want to stop, do you use your oars, or just stand up? How much draft does that thing have?

Now, before everyone gets their girdles all twisted, think about what you are peddling (or rowing) and the consequences. Jesse is getting a blowup raft and wants validation, plus juicy pictures--porn--to inflame his image. It molds to the space in his trailer. You are pitching the same beast. It's that simple.

I have owned kayaks. I have owned blowup rafts. I might be able the tie the tips of my toon together and call it a kayak, just like Jerry, but without variable draft. They all do the same thing. I'm just throwing the tacks you all choose to ignore.
 
#26
Jesse - Take a look at Scadden's stingray kayaks. I looked at the AIRE models as well as few other and went with the Stingray and could not be happier. Class 1 and 2 no problem, and does really well on stillwater, even will a strong wind.
 
#28
The 'Powerdrifter' is gone! No longer in production. I wish it was with one of the new cross stich inflatable floors.
I use a small section of carpeted plywood on top of the inflatable floor to stand on. Haven't fallen out yet. Rescued my buddy when he turtled his Scadden. Had my original Powerdrifter for 12 years. That's good quality!
 

Shapp

Active Member
#29
It may be out of production, but the good thing is that aire's patterns are all computer cut. So if you got a couple folks together that wanted a power drifter, I am pretty sure you could talk aire into making a few more.
 

Jerry Daschofsky

Moderator
Staff member
#30
Let's hit Jerry and his porn.... Tell me, when you want to stop, do you use your oars, or just stand up? How much draft does that thing hav

I have owned kayaks. I have owned blowup rafts. I might be able the tie the tips of my toon together and call it a kayak, just like Jerry, but without variable draft. They all do the same thing. I'm just throwing the tacks you all choose to ignore.
I've rowed and owed kayaks for almost 40 years. Mostly whitewater ones, but some ocean/touring ones too. Sold my Wilderness Pamlico to buy a sit on top. This came up at a phenomenal price. Every review was good on it. I bought it as a hybrid and something to use until I found a Wilderness Tarpon SOT. It's performed flawlessly so have put off looking for a hard boat. When I stop I do it either with anchor system, use oars/paddle, or do it like a traditional SOT, put my feet over the side and stand up. This boat has a floor like a SOT to stand up on. It only drafts a couple inches. The high weight capacity helps with that.

Onto your strapping two toons together comment. It's an inflatable and it's designed similar to a SOT, just with A LOT heavier carrying capacity for an identical sized SOT. I know you're smart enough to know boats and materials change. I highly doubt you use a tanned skin covered kayak. If you have a drift boat I doubt you use a true Mackenzie style wooden boat.

Also on your comment, they have to give it a name. Is it a raft? Nah not really. Is it a pontoon? Again not really. The design is similar to a SOT, so inflatable kayak is appropriate. I've also owned and designed frames for rafts and catarafts and have run them for years. This boat handles much differently than either a raft or a cat. Similar to a SOT. I feel it's a good call.