Custom rod grip please help.

#1
I have 2 custom rods that have custom grips on them. One is regular cork the other is burl cork. Both grips are a little too large. I would like to sand them both down. I started doing that with the burl cork and I have developed a ruff surface that I can't seem to smooth out. I used 150 - 220 - 300 sand paper. I also am having trouble getting the shape of it to fit my hand. Haven't started on th regular cork and now I am afraid to. Any suggestions?


Wally
 
#2
I usually use 60 - 180 - 400 - 600 grit sandpaper when turning my cork. I would use finer grit sandpaper. I fact for mild reshaping, I use 400 then 600 exclusively. Takes a long time but is very smooth. I have no experience with burled cork, however.

If you are dealing with a cheaper cork with a lot of filler, you may have to fill in the cracks. I use a mixture of cork dust and loc-tite. You then have to resand.

What sort of lathe or drill set up are you using?
 
#3
I frequently use one, two, or three burl rings in a rod grip, and I built one spey rod with alternating cork and burl rings. Burl is definitely more resistant to grinding than cork, and probably can never be made smooth. However, I use a coarse wood file to reduce my handbuilt grips, before switching to sand paper, and the file works fine on burl. The grips, burl included, come out with an even overall surface, and feel normal to the touch. BTW, burl is heavier than cork.
 

James Mello

Inventor of the "closed eye conjecture"
#4
ukntcme said:
I have 2 custom rods that have custom grips on them. One is regular cork the other is burl cork. Both grips are a little too large. I would like to sand them both down. I started doing that with the burl cork and I have developed a ruff surface that I can't seem to smooth out. I used 150 - 220 - 300 sand paper. I also am having trouble getting the shape of it to fit my hand. Haven't started on th regular cork and now I am afraid to. Any suggestions?


Wally
Can you give me your digits via a PM? I lost your number and need to talk to you. Also, I can definately give you some assistance on this grip issue! :)
 

Willie Bodger

Still, nothing clever to say...
#5
Nooksack Mac said:
I frequently use one, two, or three burl rings in a rod grip, and I built one spey rod with alternating cork and burl rings. Burl is definitely more resistant to grinding than cork, and probably can never be made smooth. However, I use a coarse wood file to reduce my handbuilt grips, before switching to sand paper, and the file works fine on burl. The grips, burl included, come out with an even overall surface, and feel normal to the touch. BTW, burl is heavier than cork.
I made my last grip out of burl rings and it is nice and smooth. I think higher grit and turning it on a spindle are the keys.

wb