5 Stages

David Dalan

69°19'15.35" N 18°44'22.74" E
#16
the missing stage is 3a, to wit - Difficult fish (or condition, or situation, or presentation).

I would also make a case for the next stage being "Catch a lot of big, difficult fish by making them do what you want"...and that's where I am stuck.

I agree, I think a 3a stage should be added :)
 

wadin' boot

Donny, you're out of your element...
#17
Probably some other stages too-
Stage 4 B- Happy to be not out fishing and yet existing with an alternate reality of potenital fishing spots via google maps, visual scouting, vicarious online vieiwing of reports, or daydreams consisting of largescale engineering projects (we're talking wetlands constructions, deadfall creation, dyke and riprap blasting, oxbow bend creating, overhanging bank having, opposite of the army corps of engineers stuff) that help construct an awesome fishery where there was none
 

GAT

Dumbfounded
#18
I'm stuck in Stage 3. Stage 4 sounds like you got skunked to me.

However, I believe I can jump Stage 4 and practice Stage 5.

I doubt if I'll ever be hanging around Stage 4. I go fishing with the absolute intent on catching fish. Just fishing ain't going to make it for me... you may as well go for a hike or something if you're happy just to "get out". I'm not happy in the least just to go fishing if I don't catch anything. There... I used a Sharpie to scratch Stage 4 off my options :)
 

chadk

Be the guide...
#19
You know me, don't you. I really only fish alone unless there is somebody with me.

Long time no hear from you. You still have that map and vise I gave you.
Well, 4 was obvious - but what I really meant was 5. Helping others out.

Map - probably used it as TP or emergency fire starter when out getting lost trying to find one of your secret spots marked on it. Actually both are sitting at my tying desk - collecting dust. But planning to start ramping that back up soon and see if any of my 8 kids will be foolish enough to enjoy tieing and I can put them to work ;)
 

Charles Sullivan

ignoring Rob Allen and Generic
#20
I don't care to pass on much to anyone else. Fishing is my time, as little of it as I get. I don't suspect I'll ever really want to pass on a bunch of knowlwedge as the fun is in the learning.

I thought I'd enjoy sharing fishing with my ladies, but they can't run downriggers. They fight in the boat and make a mess of it, I can't run gear and stear simultaneously so we rarely catch anything. Plus I'm always concerned more about their safety than catching a delicous fish.

So this week I'll start the first little kid spey rod project, right after I finish up my gear rods. I'm holding out hope that one of them will like going steelheading with dad. If that doesn't work, I am either hosed or need to convince wifey that I should buy electric downriggers.

Go Sox,
cds
 
#22
Man I totally hear ya here. After purchasing my Smokercraft at the beginning of the summer I found out very quickly what a royal pain in the ass it was to take my wife and son to Sekiu. It's hard enough to run the boat and not run into any other hundreds of boats in the area without having to stand up, let go of the outboard, and move forward to drop downriggers. I was just about done with the whole experience until my son learned to operate the riggers. After that, things got much, much easier.

That said, I'd say I'm mostly in stage 2, but jump over to stage 5 from time to time. When my son is out with me, I can honestly say I have more fun helping him catch fish than if I was catching them myself. (Not that the urge to catch them myself EVER goes away mind you). I also enjoyed sharing what I know with a few new saltwater fly anglers this year, and found that very enjoyable. As fun as catching fish myself? Eh.... I don't know about that. But fun nonetheless. Ok, I will admit that when Ira went Babe Ruth on his fat silver out of my boat this year that I had every bit as much fun as any fish I've caught. That was a blast.

Ultimately though, I'm with Gat. I go fishing to catch fish. Not catching fish sucks. Catching fish rules. It's pretty much that simple in my book.


I don't care to pass on much to anyone else. Fishing is my time, as little of it as I get. I don't suspect I'll ever really want to pass on a bunch of knowlwedge as the fun is in the learning.

I thought I'd enjoy sharing fishing with my ladies, but they can't run downriggers. They fight in the boat and make a mess of it, I can't run gear and stear simultaneously so we rarely catch anything. Plus I'm always concerned more about their safety than catching a delicous fish.

So this week I'll start the first little kid spey rod project, right after I finish up my gear rods. I'm holding out hope that one of them will like going steelheading with dad. If that doesn't work, I am either hosed or need to convince wifey that I should buy electric downriggers.

Go Sox,
cds
 
#23
1,2,3, and 4.

I have recently realized that I lack the patience for number 5. My brother recently retired and wanted me to teach him how to catch fish on a fly rod.

My first thoughts were hell yes. I fish for trout in small streams on a fly rod on - I don't have that much knowledge to pass on; a couple of knots, false cast, roll cast, read a couple of books, and I'll end up with a fishing partner. However, there's a lot of little things like line type, leaders, tippets, fly selection, reading water etc., that have made this more like work than fun. I just wanted somebody I could go fishing with, as I fish alone most of the time now. At times, I've been fairly impatient when explaining these things seemingly over and over, but I can get away with being gruff; after all, he is my brother.:D
 
#25
From a John Gierach story, "Stage Two" (attributed to bamboo rod maker, John Bradford):

Stage One: "Fish from dawn to dusk without a break, get quickly drunk on something cheap, spend the night wrapped in a wet blanket, eat cold beans from the can and don't even notice, let along care. At the end of a Stage One trip, you'll drive all night and show up at work without sleep and a half hour late. You won't care about that, either, although your boss might. But if he fires you, it only means you have more time to fish."

Stage Two: "You invest in a tent, a sleeping bag and a folding chair and start cooking your food and maybe even brushing your teeth every few days. You still camp out, but your camps are a little more luxurious. You still fish hard, but you pace yourself a little more reasonably."

Stage Three: "You say the hell with it and just rent a cabin."

After reading this, I realized I went through Stage One when I was a climbing bum
and pretty much started fly fishing at Stage Two. I'm not ready for Stage Three, yet, although I think my wife might be...
D