How many guides?

#1
Hey y'all, so, I built my first rod in January, took it out to pop it's cherry on the Yak, and after about 20 minutes of casting, the tip broke off. Classic. So, I am building my second rod. I salvaged the guides off my other rod, but it was a foot shorter. My first rod was a 4 weight, 7'6". This rod is 5 weight, 8'6". I have 8 guides, plus the top. Is this enough or do I need one more?

Thanks!

Mike
 

NIrodneck

Active Member
#2
General rule of thumb is # of feet in rod length= amount of guides+1 not including the tip. Also generally you round up on footage, otherwords an 8'6"=9". Static testing of the blank with guides will tell you how many the rod needs though because it can be one less than the rule or even one more than the rule.
 
#3
General rule of thumb is # of feet in rod length= amount of guides+1 not including the tip. Also generally you round up on footage, otherwords an 8'6"=9". Static testing of the blank with guides will tell you how many the rod needs though because it can be one less than the rule or even one more than the rule.
Precisely. Always figure you need as many guides as you have feet plus one then the tip. Tape the guides in place where you think they need to go, or use the blank manufacturers recommended spacing. Next go out and static test it. See if that setup works. You may notice you need to move a few guides around a few inches, omit a guide, or add a guide. General rule of thumb I always order an extra running guide or two in case I need to add a guide.

With all the guides on it run the line through them and pull down on the line to bend the rod. If your guides are setup correctly you wont have flat spots between guides. If you have flat spots you'll either need to add a guide or change the spacing. There should be a smooth transition from guide to guide.
 

Jim Darden

Active Member
#5
Just a thought but...have you ever thought about making a 7'-3" rood for a 6 wt line out of the broken rod? Sometimes the results will surprise you and it doesn't take too much time to test the theory.
 
#6
Speaking of guide static testing and placement, I’ve quit using the blue tape to hold the guides for testing. I found that there was a chance of getting a residue left on the rod when I was removing it and wrapping my guides. I switched to Teflon plumbers tape for holding the guides in place. I use a piece about 5” long and start on one side of the snake guide, crossing around the “hoop” and finishing out on the other foot. When I wrap I start at the finish point and work back. You can easily split the Teflon tape in half to give you a narrow strip to work with, holds tight and no chance of a glue residue.

Mike