Whats your favorite Fly

Eric Denny

Summer is over but I'm still fishing!!
#31

Krusty

Active Member
#32
So rick which is your favorite? and those all are beautiful fish!!!!!
And I don't disagree...with your disagreement! But they are notable by their exception; hit the big hatch (which is a rarity on my small mountain lakes) it can go insane! I've experienced the same thing...late summer...grasshopper population explodes. But as a dependable producer of big trout..no way. Of course, at only a half century of flyfishing...I'm a novice....seriously.

I've caught a handful of really big trout on dryflies...all thrilling...and all surprises between small fry.
 
#33
I have to disagree about dry flies and big fish (at the right time!) Here is a cutthroat from the Yak this spring on a Amy's Ant floater

and here is a nice bow from the Missouri last October on a black foam beetle

and this bad boy took a Moorish hopper on the Methow in July a few years ago
Seriously great fish on drys Rick, but please put on a puffy jacket or something. :rolleyes:
 

Krusty

Active Member
#34
Wow we only got a couple pic's I guess some of the readers feel like this is talking about there favorite spot and if they say what there favorite fly is then they might be giving up to much information.lol
It ain't about the fly or the favorite spot....it's really related to 'saddle-time'. Fish a few times a year and get lucky...and you might think it's 'the spot' or 'the right fly'...but experience will teach you otherwise.
 
#35
And I don't disagree...with your disagreement! But they are notable by their exception; hit the big hatch (which is a rarity on my small mountain lakes) it can go insane! I've experienced the same thing...late summer...grasshopper population explodes. But as a dependable producer of big trout..no way. Of course, at only a half century of flyfishing...I'm a novice....seriously.

I've caught a handful of big trout on dryflies...all thrilling...and all surprises between small fry.
Last year on Moose Creek I hooked a big boy on a #14 PMX. I just sort of stared at the diapearing line for about 5 seconds beofore I decided to clamp down. He broke the 5x like a wet noodle. I did manage one other large fish on a PMX on the Yak last fall and one in 2010.
 

Vladimir Steblina

Retired Forester...now fishing instead of working
#36
The green thing.

It is just a mis-tie of the Nyerge nymph.

There was a period of four years where I only fished with the green thing and a black marabou leech.

It was a zen period in my life. But I did learn how to catch fish!!
 

dryflylarry

"Chasing Riseforms"
#37
I have to say, for lakes around here in Western Washington, I have caught more fish on a callibaetis emerger than anything in recent years. In a local lake yesterday (even tho midges were hatching), I picked up a 20" rainbow on it. Go figure, no callibaetis hatching either, but, it brings fish to the surface anyhow! I tie it with no hackle.
 
#38
I have to say, for lakes around here in Western Washington, I have caught more fish on a callibaetis emerger than anything in recent years. In a local lake yesterday (even tho midges were hatching), I picked up a 20" rainbow on it. Go figure, no callibaetis hatching either, but, it brings fish to the surface anyhow! I tie it with no hackle.
Something like a kilkhammer type?
 

Krusty

Active Member
#39
The green thing.

It is just a mis-tie of the Nyerge nymph.

There was a period of four years where I only fished with the green thing and a black marabou leech.

It was a zen period in my life. But I did learn how to catch fish!!
You truly learned that there were far more important things than the 'right' pattern. Flyfishers are fixated on patterns...it's just a piece of the puzzle. I once did the same thing with the Renegade...wet and dry.

It was always amusing to have another flyfisher (jeez, that word is awkward...I want to say 'flyfisherman'...but that's sexist) ask me what I'm using when I'm catching fish....and I say Renegade or Olive Willy. They look at me like I'm bullshittin....they've been spending too much time reading FF magazines.

There's nothing wrong with the latest patterns....and nothing particularly right with them either. Time on water trumps everything else. Where, when, and how you place the fly is simply far more important than pattern.
 

chief

Active Member
#40
Adult Damsel is my favorite on lakes, Stimulator on rivers. There is a limited window when they work, but the question was what is your favorite, not what works for you most of the time.... Big dries are hard to beat....
 
#42
I like the October Caddis. A fun fly to experiment with and I've caught some great fish with them. Best time with the OC was fishing the little D in Tumwater. Right by the old brewery I found a hole full of trout who couldn't say no to the pumpkin fly. I watched them chase n fight over it one by on in a very aggressive way as the fly drifted over. I had eight to hand in about 40 minutes. Been in love with the fly since.
 

IveofIone

Active Member
#43
Years of stillwater fishing have led me to conclude that fish most often see something that is olive brown, about 1/2'' to 5/8'' long and shaped like a common food source. Sure, they will take buggers or often short take them, they'll lip leeches and sometimes take the most outrageous thing in your fly box. But from opening day to the closer in fall one fly produces more for me than any other-a halfback nymph. The simple combination of pheasant tail, peacock herl and a wire rib on a size 14 hook is my go-to solution to a lot of stillwater mysteries. How they spot those little things in 25' of water amazes me but they take them confidently and forcefully with little of the hunt and peck routine you often get with wooly buggers. I fish them deep and real slow on a type VI or VII line and do very, very well.

Ive
 

Rick Todd

Active Member
#44
Seriously great fish on drys Rick, but please put on a puffy jacket or something. :rolleyes:
I agree in retrospect Patrick! (especially on the north side of 60!) But it was about 95 degrees that day and the layers kept coming off! As for my favorite fly-something big and foam, like a chubby chernoble. But really, I don't think the fly makes a lot of difference. If the fish are looking up, and you float the fly over them with a reasonable profile, you will catch fish! On stillwater, stripping a fly, any drab fly with a reasonable size will catch fish at the right depth when the fish are in the mood. Tonight at our fly club, Tim Lockhart (Ford Fenders) presented a pretty good case that if the fish are feeding, you can catch them (subsurface) with just about anything. If fact, he said he wrapped a hook with duct tape one day and caught about as many as he did with any other pattern. He also said that when the fish are near the surface, say taking callebaetis, then matching the hatch is much more important. Rick
 

Eric Denny

Summer is over but I'm still fishing!!
#45
I agree in retrospect Patrick! (especially on the north side of 60!) But it was about 95 degrees that day and the layers kept coming off! As for my favorite fly-something big and foam, like a chubby chernoble. But really, I don't think the fly makes a lot of difference. If the fish are looking up, and you float the fly over them with a reasonable profile, you will catch fish! On stillwater, stripping a fly, any drab fly with a reasonable size will catch fish at the right depth when the fish are in the mood. Tonight at our fly club, Tim Lockhart (Ford Fenders) presented a pretty good case that if the fish are feeding, you can catch them (subsurface) with just about anything. If fact, he said he wrapped a hook with duct tape one day and caught about as many as he did with any other pattern. He also said that when the fish are near the surface, say taking callebaetis, then matching the hatch is much more important. Rick
Looks like you got a lot out of the speaker at your club tonight rick. Thats good and thanks for the insight.