What Class V whitewater is REALLY like . . .

cabezon

Sculpin Enterprises
#17
Wow, what some flyfishers will do to gain some solitude.... Do these sorts of drops void the warranty on a flyrod or would this be considered normal wear and tear?
Steve
 

Dan Nelson

Hiker, Fisher, Writer, Bum
#18
And, there happens to be some very nice fish to be found above, in, and below Class IV and V rapids...
During a multi-day float of the Upper Middle Fork Flathead this summer, Donna earned the nickname "The Relocator" by having a knack for hooking big fish above every Class III, IV and V rapid - she'd have to play the fish all the way through the rapids before it could be netted and released below the rapid.
 

Peyton00

Active Member
#20
The whitewater kayaking looks like a blast. I wish i could muster the internal strength, but my balls would be tucked up in my tummy if i was on class V water.
I give props to free climbers, skydivers and these guys alike. The mindset to perform those activities must make everyday living a dull day.
 

Jonnytutu

Active Member
#21
speaking of ridiculous rapids, this is one of the zambezi river down in Africa....


I had the pleasure of going river rafting on this river a few yrs ago, one of the scariest things of my life.

Fin
 

martyg

Active Member
#22
The whitewater kayaking looks like a blast. I wish i could muster the internal strength, but my balls would be tucked up in my tummy if i was on class V water.
I give props to free climbers, skydivers and these guys alike. The mindset to perform those activities must make everyday living a dull day.
Payton -

You should check out some classes. NW Outdoor Center runs a GREAT WW immersion course on the Wenatchee. I have attended simply because it is so reasonable. For the cost that I could not match on my own I have five days of boating, shuttles, food and lodging. I forget the price but I want to say $600? It is a steal.

We have a saying in kayaking instruction, "Patterns of grace, moments of pressure." Meaning that you ingrain the proper behavior and muscle memory on easy water, and when the time comes to paddle hard water the response is like breathing in your sleep. The best paddlers in the world train on a slalom course where the waves are 6" high - the feeder canal to the Potomac River - for that very reason. It is the same with skiing. In either case if it feels like you are working hard it is probably because you are doing it incorrectly. Turning skis on a 45 degree slope or rolling a kayak should feel absolutely effortless once you put your body in the correct position and execute.

More over, I don't think that it is about internal strength. I think that it is about learning your craft and, most importantly, seeing opportunities and not obstacles. And I would argue that the ability to see opportunities and not obstacles is what makes anyone great in the field, whether it is sports, business, medicine, or relationships.

The great thing about paddling is that it is a lifetime sport that you can pursue regardless of your physical aptitude. I can have just as much fun dinking around throwing ends in a eddy line on a Class II river as I can running something more advanced. After training on the water 10 x per week regardless of the weather in my younger days I am totally content to be on a Class III river when it is sunny and 80 degrees out.
 

Greg Armstrong

OldRodsHaveMoreFun
#23
Kent,
Thank you for starting this thread.
I've been fishing a bit upstream from that little "riffle" off and on for the past few years. I had no idea that stretch was quite that spectacular.
With visions of this video, I'll take care to wade a little more cautiously while upstream of that stretch from now on!

Oh, it needs to be left "as is". No dam should ever go there!
 
#26
Check out the Illinois, a trib of the Rogue... Now, think small winter steelhead run, 30 Class IV rapids or better in a remote wilderness canyon that can jack from 1,500 CFS to 8,000 CFS in 24 hours due to the rocky drainage it serves. 31 miles of possibilities - and a Class V rapid called "The Green Wall"... YouTube that steelhead run. Maybe this winter if we can conjure up the cojones...
 

martyg

Active Member
#27
I read once in a guidebook that the campsites on the Illinois are more sites of desperation than comfort - and I can concur.

As a winter run it would be cold and foreboding. However hit the right sequence of days in Spring when the temps get up to the 70's, the days are getting long and the nights are filled with stars and it is a special place to be.

Another option for that river is to pack really light and do it in Summer at low flows with a ducky. I haven't fished it in Summer but it should hold fish. You'll do a lot of dragging and carrying, but it is a rewarding trip.
 

PT

Physhicist
#29
When there aren't any more steelhead or salmon to chase in our rivers, I will take up kayaking. It's too hard to pass up the opportunity to fish, as long as I have the opportunity to fish.