Tent trailers?

#17
As with all thing you have to ask yourself what do you want to do with it? Tent trailers like my coleman evolution excell if you intend to use the for remote camping where the is no electricity or water & you are driving on narrow dirt roads to get there. The big 5th wheel trailers are nice for full amenity rv parks. but that said when I go camping thats exacxtly what I'm doing, I'm camping,I'm not interested in driveing somewhere to sit in an air condition trailer watching tv and listening to the endless varity of incoming call ring tones on cell phones. For that type of trip we rent a condo or hotel room at places like westport or disneyland..
A few valid points here, too, however the fifth wheel is quite capable of "dry" camping" in places other than just being restricted to "full amenity" rv parks. Other than narrow roads presenting some difficulties, they may be better, having larger food/water storage capacities that offer an extended stay in the woods over the tent trailer. We rarely stay at the "park".
If you take into consideration that a 20' fifth wheel has about 4/5' of its length in the bed of the truck, you've only got 15/16' behind your vehicle. Some of the tent trailers we've seen are actually longer. They (pop-us) are definitely lighter, better for gas mileage and you can jockey them around by hand.
Remember, I'm not a proponent of the downgrade.
FWIW, when fishing, I leave my cell in the truck and respectfully request you do also. The last thing I want to hear in serenity is someone's ring tone.:D
 

bennysbuddy

the sultan of swing
#21
This may be the one.
2014 model reg. $14458 on sale for $10952. With our fifth wheel trade $7500.
Inside toilet with holding tank. Hot/cold shower outside. 15" wheels, double LPG tanks & battery (room for 2).
Enlarge the pics, scroll down.
http://www.mikethompson.com/inventory/2014-coachmen-clipper/cp14018
Any opinions?
That the unit I'm useing, but I have a set of racks on top to carry 2 pontoon boats, I use a 18 volt drill to raise & lower the unit & set the leveling pads instead of the optional built in electric raise & lower unit.
 
#23
I like the ground clearance and the extra storage on the front. That would be a great spot for a permanent mounted locking storage box like a pick-up toolbox. When we had a tent trailer one thing I really liked was all the windows it made you feel like you were outdoors all the time. A lot of the hard sided trailers are dark and closed in.
The only thing I can see is maybe an upgrade on the thickness of the cushions and mattresses. We added memory foam to our thin mattress it made a huge difference.
jesse
 
#24
I like the ground clearance and the extra storage on the front. That would be a great spot for a permanent mounted locking storage box like a pick-up toolbox. When we had a tent trailer one thing I really liked was all the windows it made you feel like you were outdoors all the time. A lot of the hard sided trailers are dark and closed in.
The only thing I can see is maybe an upgrade on the thickness of the cushions and mattresses. We added memory foam to our thin mattress it made a huge difference.
jesse
4" heated mattresses rest on an 1.25" laminated foam/solid wood surface as opposed to bare wood or pressboard. Adding memory foam is a good idea.
You can get a full, across the front slide-out bin as an option.
I can see mounting another area o the rear for more storage, too.
 

Krusty

Active Member
#25
I've had a tent trailer for 10 years, and hate the damn thing. Cold in the spring and fall, and the only thing they got over a tent is that you're really off the ground. We're going for a small hardshell like a Scamp....you can still get into primitive spots, with some of the comforts of home.
 

bennysbuddy

the sultan of swing
#26
I've had a tent trailer for 10 years, and hate the damn thing. Cold in the spring and fall, and the only thing they got over a tent is that you're really off the ground. We're going for a small hardshell like a Scamp....you can still get into primitive spots, with some of the comforts of home.
When it gets cold my furnace kicks on, never a problem
 
#27
I find the cold much easier to deal with. You can always equip/dress for the cold. Heat/humidity, however, is a different story. When it gets "sweltering", you are limited trying to cool down.
If your camping with AC and a hard side trailer....not bad, anything else, your going to be downright uncomfortable.
 

Vladimir Steblina

Retired Forester...now fishing instead of working
#28
I have a tent trailer for sale on Craig's list in Wenatchee. We have owned a tent trailer for the past 35 years.

Tent trailers are great for three season use. Particularly, if you have kids or stay in one area for extended periods of time. As mentioned, the put-up and take-down is really the issue with a tent trailer.

Trailers are an issue anyway on Forest Service roads. The nice thing about a tent trailer is you can dis-connect and turn it around.

We bought a 30 foot fifth wheel. A great trailer for spending the winter in Arizona. Everything shakes loose on Forest Service roads and I would not take it many miles from pavement.

We are going to buy a truck camper. Also take a look at pop-up truck campers if there are just two of you.

Oh, my bottom line in an RV is that it has to have a shower. I hated working in the woods and not having access to a shower!!! Twenty-three days without a shower will do that.
 
#29
Don't mind a cab-over if you have another mode of transportation where your camping. Pulling up stakes to go to the store, out to eat, etc. is a pain in the a**
 

Salmo_g

Well-Known Member
#30
If you're camping with AC, you're not really camping. Sorry; I couldn't over look that one. I had a tent trailer for a few years, then went back to tent camping. I found I prefer traveling lighter and not dragging my home away from home around behind the car or truck. When I tow something, it's the boat.

Sg