Unknowables

#16
What's happening on those days when the conditions are ideal but nobody can dial in a bite? The usual haunts give up a fish or two then nothing. You end up with a handful of fish caught on as many different flies and presentations.
 
#17
Last February out at Pass lake towards the end of the day I came across a massive daphnia hatch. The swarm were right under the surface of the water, about 15 from the shore, about 10 feet across and it snaked 20 or 30 yards down the shoreline. It was fascinating watching it move slowly in and out, but more fascinating was watching my indicator drop into the middle and then promptly dip under the water for about 40 minutes. The fish were simply stacked in there with the daphnia and they were happily eating my presentation in place of the tiny little bugs.

That is the only time I have ever seen a swarm like that and I keep wondering if it happens all the time on lakes but I just don't know it because wind hasn't pushed them up against a shore and upswelled them or if that was a truly unique freak situation? If it does happen on a more regular basis, is there anyway to find the swarms in shallower lakes say no deeper than 20'? Would the existence of these swarms explain the occasional "Hot Spots" that I sometimes find in lakes when all I throat pump from the fish I catch are daphnia?

Leaving you to wage war on those trout feasting on that daphnia cloud so that I could go to work was just torture
 

GAT

Dumbfounded
#19
For a couple of years, I kept two small bass in my aquarium. I fed them garden worms (their favorite) each day. For reasons that I never quite understood, there were some days they refused to eat.

They would look at the worm and then ignore it. The day before they would have attacked it within seconds. Then... just as suddenly as with just as no clue as to why, they'd go back into a feeding frenzy and grab the worms the second they hit the water.

I think something similar occurs in the wild. I've heard some folks say that a fish must eat every day to survive. I don't believe that and my bass guys sure didn't need to eat each day to survive because they didn't and they did.

So maybe, just maybe, for whatever reason, the fish don't care about eating that day. But they'll make up for it the next.
 

GAT

Dumbfounded
#21
I'd like to know why it is that the more technical I get with my offerings and ftechniques that it is even more likely that fish will try to eat my indicator
Yup... we think the fish are so damned smart that they won't take an artificial fly but they hit an indicator that doesn't look like a bug by any stretch of the imagination.

Obviously we are tying our dry flies incorrectly... we should tie them to imitate indicators.... not bugs....
 

GAT

Dumbfounded
#23
I tried adding a hook to an indicator and the trout ignored it...

I replaced it with a duplicate indicator without a hook and the trout started hitting it.

Who knows?
 

FinLuver

Active Member
#27
I tried adding a hook to an indicator and the trout ignored it...

I replaced it with a duplicate indicator without a hook and the trout started hitting it.

Who knows?

Could it be the duct tape you are using?? :p:D
 

Irafly

Indi "Ira" Jones
#28
Not stillwater related, but I did watch from a bridge as a steelhead came up and took my friends indicator fly. It was a very innovative pattern that worked well.
 

aimacart

Active Member
#29
I was fishing at fish lake last year with my son. We were fishing near a pontoon boat who were fishing with powerbait. When they left we trolled over to that area and when we got there there was some powerbait on the surface. A larger fish came up and tried to grab it but being a bigger piece it took the fish three tries before it could get it. I told my son we need to tie some powerbait flies.