NF Stilly slide

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#61
This is horrible news! My heart goes out to to victims of this tragedy. Just out of curiosity, does anyone (Smalma or Salmo G) know how the size of this slide compares to the Deforest Creek slide?
 

Smalma

Active Member
#63
Andrew -
The two "slides" were driven by two difference processes primarily due to the differences in the hill side substrates. As we know the recent "Steelhead Haven" slide material was mostly clays and trees. As I understanding the current estimate that it involved approximately a million cube yards of material.

The Deforest Creek slide (on Deer Creek that failed 30 years ago) occurred on a hill side that was mostly layered silts, sands, and gravel. Much like the Steelhead Haven slide there was a huge more or less instant failure/slide but after that event the hill side continue to erode and flowing into Deer Creek until the upslope essentially reached the top of the "hill". Due to the remoteness of the area the slide site was not visited for weeks after the event. The size initial event was several 1000,000s cubic yards of material (something in the 1/2 million cube yards range). It took nearly two years of the more or less constant erosion before reach the top of the hill by which time the total volume has been estimated at 1.8 million yards of material. The scary thing in Deer Creek is that it has been estimated that in the decade of the 1980s the Deforest Creek slide was the source of only 1/2 of the material entering Deer Creek from upslope failures - A situation where many of us were surprised that the Deer Creek summer steelhead survived to today.

Curt
 
#64
When we heard about the slide here in Colorado, we contacted family on Camano Island to make sure all were okay. I've fished with my brother-in-law up that way several times over the years. I'm happy that family is fine, but saddened by the loss of life and the extensive damage to the North Fork fishery. Thinking of all of those that love the Stilly today. Thanks, Curt, for all the good information.
 
#65
Andrew -
The two "slides" were driven by two difference processes primarily due to the differences in the hill side substrates. As we know the recent "Steelhead Haven" slide material was mostly clays and trees. As I understanding the current estimate that it involved approximately a million cube yards of material.

The Deforest Creek slide (on Deer Creek that failed 30 years ago) occurred on a hill side that was mostly layered silts, sands, and gravel. Much like the Steelhead Haven slide there was a huge more or less instant failure/slide but after that event the hill side continue to erode and flowing into Deer Creek until the upslope essentially reached the top of the "hill". Due to the remoteness of the area the slide site was not visited for weeks after the event. The size initial event was several 1000,000s cubic yards of material (something in the 1/2 million cube yards range). It took nearly two years of the more or less constant erosion before reach the top of the hill by which time the total volume has been estimated at 1.8 million yards of material. The scary thing in Deer Creek is that it has been estimated that in the decade of the 1980s the Deforest Creek slide was the source of only 1/2 of the material entering Deer Creek from upslope failures - A situation where many of us were surprised that the Deer Creek summer steelhead survived to today.

Curt
Thanks Curt.
 

Freestone

Not to be confused with freestoneangler
#66
Got a Facebook note today from a friend who talked to Mike today. He has left his house and is staying with family.
Bill, Mike was my first thought when I heard about the slide (on WFF). I knew he lived downstream a few miles but we called him just to be sure he was safe. Sorry that I didn't post that he was ok and already staying with family.
 

flybill

Purveyor of fine hackle, wine & cigars!
#67
Bill, Mike was my first thought when I heard about the slide (on WFF). I knew he lived downstream a few miles but we called him just to be sure he was safe. Sorry that I didn't post that he was ok and already staying with family.
I was going to call, probably should have, but figured he was busy dealing with all of the stuff taking place. Just glad he's good, since I was having trouble figuring out where everything was yesterday. Thanks Sue!
 

Josh

dead in the water
#69
Is the general consensus that this was a fickle-hand-of-fate/power-of-mother-nature type of thing? Or was the stability of the area affected by logging or other activity?

I don't want to jump to the assumption that logging had anything to do with it. After all, mother nature happens and happens with force sometimes. But we also know that the best choices have rarely been made as far as development/logging/etc on some of our cascade hills.

I'm just not familiar enough with the specific history of the area to know.
 

Karry

Lost in Nontana
#70
This may be bigger that the Thistle slide in 83, I saw the devastation there and knew the area well before hand. The Stilly is by far more deadly, prayers for the people there.
 
#72
Perhaps it would help to refer to the slide area by a single name. When slides occurred here in the past, they have been called the Halterman or Steelhead Haven slides. Halterman was a whistle stop on the Arlington-Darrington railroad almost exactly across the river from the slide's point of origin; Steelhead Haven was the location of a cabin-site development only a short distance above Halterman (Hazel is about three miles upstream of Halterman). When the first major slide (of recent years,1956?) briefly dammed the river it cut the Steelhead Haven development in two as it reverted to an old channel to the south. Another point of identification would be the run known as the Mermaid, accessed by a trail north from the highway near the school bus turnaround. In all likelihood it is no more.
Preston,

I will try to post the link. You can see what the Mermaid run looks like today at the blog site "Stillaguamish Steelhead Society".

steve
 

Preston

Active Member
#73
I was thinking about the Mermaid because it was the first place I ever hooked (briefly) a steelhead on a waking fly. Even at that time it was not as good as it had been in earlier years. I haven't been in there for a good many years and even the last time I fished it it offered very little good water.
 

bennysbuddy

the sultan of swing
#74
It's a good thing the river is closed,as that's my favorite fishing spot for steelhead this time of year. in fact lots of people use the school bus turn around area as parking on weekends for river access.there are still many people unaccounted for.
 
#75
How did the "unaccounted" for list jump from 18 to 108 over night. That's a hell of a lot of people. I don't pray but I sure hope that that number is just the number of people who haven't contacted family or the authorities yet.
 
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