a little help for early spring

Discussion in 'Stillwater' started by sharpshooter223, Feb 10, 2008.

  1. sharpshooter223

    sharpshooter223 Member

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    im not asking for fly patterns but in the early spring what do the fish bite at usually. are they feeding on big leeches or are they going after mayfly nymphs or chironomids or are there even damselfly or dragonfly nymphs in the water? also where in the water column are they during early spring? are they down at the bottom or cruising the surface or somewhere inbetween?
     
  2. mozart

    mozart Chris

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  3. Taxon

    Taxon Moderator Staff Member

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    Sharpshooter-

    One important variable is how recently the trout were stocked. Generally speaking, it takes stocked trout some days to acclimate to their new waterbody, during which time they are likely to be found in the general vicinity of the stocking site, and in the upper part of the water column. During this period they are pretty unsophisticated feeders, and can be attracted to almost anything.

    However, if one is fishing for fish that were planted in the fall, or after the spring plants have dispersed, the trout will have become more discriminating in their feeding habits, and are much more likely to be attracted to prey which is available in reasonable abundance. When you mention early spring, I will assume that you are referring to the period from early March to early April, when the water is still relatively cold. During this period, the trout prey in most abundance would likely be chironomids. During and immediately prior to a hatch of chironomids, the most effective way to fish them is to imitate the pupal stage as it rises in the water column. Trout tend to position themselves at a particular level and wait for them to rise to that level. The trick is to determine what that level is. Hope this information is of some use to you.
     
  4. uncledave

    uncledave corkie stare blind

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    Bloodworms are effective during the winter months. Bloodworms are the larval stage of chironomids. As they migrate along the bottom, wind generated currents can buoy them up in the water column, making them available. Fish a long leader, dead drifted 1/4 downwind. Watch your line to leader connection for the take. For blind old guys, use a strike indicator.
     
  5. Tim Lockhart

    Tim Lockhart Active Member

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    Good to know timing of the various food sources but I wouldn't advise limiting yourself to "these" flies at "this" time of year. OK as a starting point but you also want to show up w/ an open mind and ability to improvise when (not if) the expected doesn't work. I'd say 80% of the time I don't get to decide what will draw strikes. Rather, the fish decide and hopefully I'm listening. I'm only interested in what works on a particular day, not what makes logical sense. Trout are funny that way.
     
  6. scottflycst

    scottflycst Active Member

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    Sharp,
    Roger gives great info. Another suggestion for every serious trout fisherman is Dave Whitlock's book entitled " Guide to Aquatic Trout Foods". Its an easy read with info you'll reference for the rest of your fishing life. Dave's a great artist and his book is filled with his illustrations.
    Scott