A River Runs Through It TRIVIA

#46
That movie did more to ruin fly fishing than all the gill nets in the Sahara
Amen to that, Don.
Just after it came out all the rivers and lakes became over run by newbies equipped with expensive gear.
And it seemed to me like these folks kept their flies in the air more than in the water.
Also noticed how long distance casting was something of their badge showing off what they were taught in casting classes.
Ironic really since most fish are hooked within 35 ft of you.
 
#47
Amen to that, Don.
Just after it came out all the rivers and lakes became over run by newbies equipped with expensive gear.
And it seemed to me like these folks kept their flies in the air more than in the water.
Also noticed how long distance casting was something of their badge showing off what they were taught in casting classes.
Ironic really since most fish are hooked within 35 ft of you.
Very true. Another thing I see is that some will wade into the river before even looking at the near bank to see if there are any good drifts or holes that can be fished. Seems like they are fixed on the other side of the river with a fifty yard cast and a #22 fly. Unfortunately almost all will never achieve that goal.
 

GAT

Dumbfounded
#48
One day while fishing the Barns Holes in YNP, a young lady and her dog showed up. As I'm keen to watch what other fly anglers are doing, I watched her string up her rod, walk down to the river and start casting. She was quite impressive. She was making long, long beautiful casts. I'm sure everyone at the Barns Holes was impressed.

After a half hour of casting, she packed up and drove away.

Evidently some folks prefer casting to actually catching fish. Personally, I'm in it for the catching bit and not the casting. At the time, a dead drift presentation with a dropper system was working to catch trout so you didn't need to cast any further than 20 feet.

But boy howdy!... she could cast... she didn't catch any fish but she sure could cast!
 

Drifter

Active Member
#52
I loved the fly casting in this movie. I had already been fly fishing for about 15 years with mostly glass and in 81 went to full flex superfine rods. Many of the casting that was filmed just can not be done with a fast rod, soft flexing rods allow so many more cast and manipulations of the line there is really no comparison.

I have fished with some other fisherman recently that just had to cast a country mile all day long! it seems the "ART OF CASTING" means a whole new thing these days. The tight loop 70 to 90 ft. bombs seem to prove how good a fly fisherman is today - NOT -

Its the shadow cast - the 40 to 50 ft. roll cast turning over a 12 to 14 ft. leader that is the art of fly casting! The side arm - under brush cast or the drop cast - loop under just over the water lifting fly at the end of cast to float down like a feather to "touch the water" that rules the art of fly casting!

What I noticed about the casting in the movie was how the rod flexed even after the cast was complete, vibrating, tip being pulled "flexed" with the line still in its loop! all the things that today's rod makers or fly fisherman considered CRAP or noodles or worthless!

The art of casting to me has nothing to do with a 90 ft. cast, should you be able to do one "yes" for certain situations but has nothing to do with the art if you ask me! I have a couple bombing rods but all the rest are flexing "NOODLES" because there are things you can do with boo - glass - and noodle graphite you can never do with a fast - tip flex bomber. Give me the 30 to 60 foot comfortable casting distance and let me play with the "art of casting" and catch fish all day long and you will hear any complaints from me!

I myself loved the movie and could care less how many people picked up the sport. One thing I do know is 10% of the fisherman catch 90% of the fish! More people in fly fishing only means that people became much more aware of what managing quality waters for fish means.
 
#55
FYI trivia - a bamboo rod was NOT used to perform the shadow cast. Jason broke 2 bamboo rods before Redford OK's using a graphite composite fly rod.
 
#58
RRTI Trivia - Watch the segment where paul catches the big rainbow and follows the trout downstream. The scene was shot twice; once in the summer during primary shooting.

Then during editing, Redford was not satisfied and Jason had to shoot the scene again during winter in FEBRUARY in period clothing. The river was lined with artificial greenery. But because of the harsh winter light, they could not color balance the winter shots to match the summer shots. You can tell what scenes were shot during winter and which ones during summer.

Second trivia - two different rainbows were used during this part of the movie. One is clearly a hook jawed male but the other is a female. You can tell that the fish are switched when you closely examine the fish during various shots.

Third Trivia - For that scene, Jason went to the Yellowstone in Paradise Valley and caught two large rainbows. Jason put them in a cage in the river so he could recover them when needed. When the scene was scheduled to be shot, Jason went back to get the fish. He discovered the someone had either taken or released the fish. Jason then had to fish and catch two more large rainbows which are the ones used in the scene.

Fourth Trivia - the movie poster has Jason making the cast. The leader was not obvious enough in the photo so it was retouched. The retouching only accentuated the leader and did not change the cast.