A Sea Run's eating habits

Discussion in 'Saltwater' started by kelvin, Jan 23, 2013.

  1. Stonefish

    Stonefish Triploid, Humpy & Seaplane Hater

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    Nice tie Kelvin. I'd give that a try for sure.
    I agree with Don in regards if it moves it could possibly be food. I don't think I'd underestimate what they might eat due to their aggressive nature.
     
  2. kelvin

    kelvin Active Member

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    View attachment 23285
    P4250338.JPG

    pretty close
     
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  3. Mark Mercer

    Mark Mercer Member

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    Looks great!! I knew you'd come up with something good.
     
  4. kelvin

    kelvin Active Member

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    That is what I was thinking that is why I asked
    I guess I will give them a try and as I am fond of saying when in doubt tie on a flatwing P4250357.JPG
     
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  5. mbowers

    mbowers Active Member

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    If you really believe that the only requirements for the best fly are that it moves and fits in their mouth why would you fish anything but the simplest of patterns? #10 hook with a thread body retrieved very slowly should work as well as anything else. Your fly will spend more time in the feeding zone and you won't get tired from making lots of casts..

    IMHO they might eat anything but they are more likely to eat certain things in certain situations and I will catch more fish SOME of the time if I have the optimal fly pattern for that situation. I suspect an adult crab pattern is very rarely the optimum fly for cutthroat (maybe never?). I would also guess that an adult crab pattern fished where adult crabs live (on the bottom) would be very attractive to sculpins and you might spend all your time unhooking them! :)
     
  6. Steve Saville

    Steve Saville Active Member

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    Nice tie, Kelvin. I've searched the web for a "crab larvae fly" for quite a while and haven't found anything. You might have it. I have wanted to try one all winter for resident coho but had no idea where to start. Now I do. Thanks.
     
  7. Don Freeman

    Don Freeman Free Man

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    If I really believed that was the requirement for the BEST fly I would have said so. Don't put words in my mouth.

    By the way, some of the best cutthroat fishermen I know, who've been doing it for 50+ years use nothing but an olive wooly bugger, catch more fish than you or I, and can't understand the mania to match the hatch for one of the most opportunistic feeders in the sound.
     
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  8. Roger Stephens

    Roger Stephens Active Member

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    Agree but there are a couple of exceptions that are important to be aware of to have success when the proper fly pattern will make a difference.

    (1) When chum fry outmigrate in Spring, it can be almost a "match the hatch" situation. If the sea-run cutthroat are really "keyed into" chum fry, a chum fry or similar baitfish pattern can make the difference between having good success vs. marginal fishing.

    (2) June through Oct. sea-run cutthroat can be totally "keyed into" sand lance if there is a good population available. In situations like that I have used a sand lance pattern and had hookups every couple of casts while my fishing partner was using a "proven" pattern and had no hookups. Once he switched to a sand lance pattern, he started hooking up fish. The fishing can be incredible using a top water sand lance pattern in these situations.

    Roger
     
  9. Bob Triggs

    Bob Triggs Stop Killing Wild Steelhead!

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    The megalops stage crab fly patterns that I have used,(sorry no picture), have been size #10 or #12 or even #14 to #16, (closer to actual size But still huge compared to the naturals), tied on shrimp/scud hooks, very, very sparse. I use mono eyes, either store bought or home burned mono tips, about 1/8" to 1/16" diameter. If anything I like the eyes to be a little "overstated" or abnormally large. Even at 1/16" your mono eyes will be larger than the real ones. And I will wrap a thread base on the hook, from behind the eye to well into the bend, and then tie in one frond of CDC, grey or tan, at the "tail". And then wrap the thread to behind the eye again. Then I will tie in two light tan or grey CDC fronds, in much the same manner we would tie in calf tail hair, as stand up, split wings for a Wulff type dry fly. I set these CDC "wings" very close to the eye of the hook, at 90 degree sideways angles to the hook. A variation in this is to use a very sparse, thin dubbing, such as possum. I like it with dubbing. But it has to be impossibly sparse. This is a matter of creating a ghostly, impressionistic, translucent fly, rather than a full bodied opaque fly.

    If you look at the megalops stage crabs in the water, in a natural setting, often they are barely visible as individuals. Once they group up they appear as "clouds" or groups of greyish or beige colored "swimmers", though they are not very fast. You can be looking right at them and miss them. Larger pocket estuaries, tide pools, lagoons, near shore shallows, places with warmer and more plankton rich water etc, can hold huge numbers of these crab juveniles in early to mid summer. And every fish and bird will eat them. Even on a size 16 to 18 hook your imitation will be bigger than the naturals. But it will work, usually on lighter tippet, a 5x or 6x, and dead drifted. I have seen some interesting patterns that were simply a bit of glue gun glue, spread along the hook shank, and a pair of mono eyes, on very small dry fly or shrimp/scud hooks. I do like scud flies, size 12 through 16, in an ash, grey or olive color. And these can double for gamarid amphipods, or "Beach Hoppers", very nicely. We see Cutthroat feeding at the edges for these very commonplace small crustaceans as well.

    I have no doubt that crabs in the soft shell state, at any stage of life, would be easy prey for Cutthroat.

    my blog: http://olympicpeninsulaflyfishing.blogspot.com
     
  10. kelvin

    kelvin Active Member

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    Bob great info
    any chance you can post a picture of your megalops?
    ant particular time of year you find they work better?


     
  11. kelvin

    kelvin Active Member

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    apparently the inspiration for the movie ALIEN
    crablarvae_600.jpg megalops2.jpg

    crab_megalopa_larva.jpg
     
  12. Mark Mercer

    Mark Mercer Member

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    +1... would really like to see a photo of your fly, if possible.
    Thanks,

    Mark
     
  13. freestoneangler

    freestoneangler Not to be confused with Freestone

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    No experience to offer I'm afraid as I am still a SRC newb. I will say this, that is one damn fine looking crab pattern and if I was a SRC, I'd be all over it like a rat on a cheeto :D.
     
  14. kelvin

    kelvin Active Member

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    apparently some fish do enjoy these beside Sea Run Cutthroat
    given the number of these in this fishes gut
    I think there are times this could be a prodctive pattern

    gutsfixed.jpg
     
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  15. kelvin

    kelvin Active Member

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    3mm in size