Airflo scout vs airflo skagit switch?

Discussion in 'Spey Clave' started by MNguyendc, Nov 13, 2017.

  1. MNguyendc

    MNguyendc Member

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    hey all,

    I am trying to figure out the difference between the two airflo lines in the 480 grain. Airflo scout vs skagit switch. Seems like the taper is same,..except the scout is 1 foot shorter. Yet I hear all sorts of opposing recommendation. Is the taper that different or the 1' that big of a difference..
     
  2. jake-e-boy

    jake-e-boy sans caféine

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    No it’s not.

    Switch lines go higher grains and might work better on some 13’+ rods.

    What rod are you attempting to line? If it is sub 13’ I would probably go scout
     
  3. MNguyendc

    MNguyendc Member

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    This is the spec I pulled from airflo website. Im going to get gloomis imx-pro 71111 with the first gen skagit switch 480 and a rage compact 420. But aside from that, I just want to understand these lines better and scout and skagit switch g2 seem so close.

    Scout
    480g. 7/8. 18.5 head. 6/10/1.5 taper

    Skagit switch g2
    480g. 7/8. 19.5 head. 7/10.5/1.5
     
  4. 4sallypat

    4sallypat Active Member

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    I use the Scout head (short like the OPST Commando) on my short 10' 6" 5wt trout spey rod and it's great for casting 10' Light MOW tips which I use a lot with the Scout head.

    The Skagit Switch line is 1' longer and might be good for longer rods.

    Both lines are shorter than your typical skagit head so care in casting is needed to prevent blowing out your anchor.

    Perry Poke cast is the best for these short lines - repositions easily by dumping your rod and keeps the line in front to execute an active roll cast to the target.

    I like my Airflo Scout head for aerial casting (single spey and snake roll) but have the keep the line close to the water during the sweep/roll to prevent the anchor from blowing.
     
  5. MNguyendc

    MNguyendc Member

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    Taper is same but extra foot on the switch. Maybe the grains are proportioned differently?
     
  6. fireroad

    fireroad Member

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    I would hit up Tom Larimer or Jacob Zirkle on Facebook and they can give you the exact recommendations for your rod. One thing to note is that you go down one size when going from the Skagit Switch to (edited) Rage heads. In this case if you feel the 480 Switch is the head for your rod then you would want the (edited) 450 Rage.

    I can't say for certain but I suspect that the Skagit Scout is an even more refined version of the Skagit Switch G2 (which is a refined version of the original Switch) with a focus on the lighter line weights, possibly with a lighter core or thinner coating. For a 7wt I would go with the Switch over the Scout, particularly distance is the goal.
     
    Last edited: Dec 14, 2017
  7. fireroad

    fireroad Member

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    I stand corrected, looks like they are not recommending droping down a size between the 480 skagit switch and skagit scout (previous post edited)

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Dec 14, 2017
  8. golfman44

    golfman44 5-Time Puget Sound Steelhead Guide of the Year

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  9. Evan Burck

    Evan Burck Fudge Dragon

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    The only sizes that overlap are the 450gr and 480gr. Otherwise, they're essentially the same thing, with the Scout taking over for the smaller sizes and the Switch G2 taking over for the larger sizes. The overlapped sizes are only about a foot different. So typically, the only time you'll be trying to decide which one to get is if you're in one of those two sizes. Personally, I'm inclined to pick the Switch G2 every time in those sizes because I like that little bit of extra leeway with not blowing the anchor.

    99% of my usage of the Scout is in the smaller sizes on the Echo OHS rod for single hand spey.

    Scout- 150gr - 480gr
    Switch G2 - 450gr - 600gr
     
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  10. fireroad

    fireroad Member

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    With the new lighter <300gr Rage heads coming out do you still recommend going one size smaller then the Scout Head for the same rod?



    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  11. Evan Burck

    Evan Burck Fudge Dragon

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    For Rage and Scout, it's typically the same recommendation vs the longer Skagit/Scandi heads. Your results may vary - really depends on how you cast. But in general, same grain weight Rage and Scout for the same rod.
     
  12. 4sallypat

    4sallypat Active Member

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    The Rage head is better for delicate presentations like trout on calm waters.
    Recently used the Rage head for brook & cutthroat trout in the Uinta headwaters using dry flies.

    The Scout head is better for more distance / constrained casting for presentations like steelies, salmon, and rushing water use.
    I recently used the Scout head for Missouri river brown trout in fast moving water where a crashing head with a sinking streamer does not spook the fish.
     
  13. Evan Burck

    Evan Burck Fudge Dragon

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    The way I'd describe it is that the Rage is more of a swiss army knife that can be used as a floater, but not nearly as delicate as a true scandi. It can be used as a light sink tip head, but without the power of a skagit. It's a jack of all trades, and the one thing I think it does best is cast in to the wind.

    If it's delicate presentation you want, go Scandi. If it's sink tip work you want, go Skagit. If you want to use a bunch of different PolyLeaders/light sink tips and need to swap tips a bunch, go Rage.
     
  14. fireroad

    fireroad Member

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    That pretty much sums up my experience with Rage heads. A long(er) distance, less heavy handed, windy day (awesome on calm days too) cousin to the Skagit Compact. Perfect for "damp fly" work! I have not tried mine with FLO tips but have been told that T7 is no problem. Thrilled to see they are available down to 180 gr now.

    When I was just starting out I asked Tom Larimer if it was better to learned Scandi first or Skagit first. He said "Pick one style and stick with it". The thought behind that was too often he guided folks that fished skagit all winter and were struggling to cast scandi in the summer or vice versa. Most folks didn't have the time or fish enough to master both styles. His (and several others) solution was to develop the Rage head so folks could concentrate on Skagit casting year round but have a head that will perform scandi-esque functions needed during summer and early fall steelhead fishing in the PNW. That was enough to convince me to focus on skagit only and the combination of the Rage and Skagit Compact heads cover 99% of my spey needs.
     
  15. Yard Sale

    Yard Sale Huge Member

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    100% agree and the reason I can’t stand the rage line. Guess that might be because I mostly fish from a boat or car and can carry 2 rods rigged differently. If it’s windy I just fish the compact scandi with a 5’ poly leader and short tippet since the choppy water will hide my line.