Anchor line length..

#1
I am setting up a new to me Pram (Thank you, Ive), for chironomid fishing.
Have a couple of Thomas Pocket Pullers installed.
I was wondering how much anchor line length should i purchase for most scenarios?
I was thinking 50' should be plenty, but I have never done this.
I am pretty certain 50' will do me fine at Pass lake, who knows where I'll wind up.
The Pram is opening up all kinds of new water to me.
 

Buzzy

Active Member
#2
I rarely fish stillwater deeper than 30 feet so in most cases a 50 foot rope is adequate. However, with any wind, I like to scope out the bow line anchor so I run 60 feet of line. Once I have the bow anchor set and scoped out, I drop my stern anchor pretty much vertical with the bow mostly into the "W". This works much of the time. If the "W" is shifting direction often, then my boat will swing since the stern anchor doesn't offer resistance. This can be an issue when fishing "naked" (vertical fishing with midges and a full sink line). Anchoring perpendicular to the wind and anchoring fore and aft gives you better control of the boat's motion but I don't like fishing over the side, I like fishing right off the stern.

Another thing to consider is your type of anchor. I've been really frustrated with my usual bow anchor (4" steel round stock) when the bottom is hard and slopes. It doesn't hold in these cases. It works great if the bottom is flat, muddy or weedy. I've taken to carrying a different anchor when fishing a couple lakes where I do tend to break loose........

That's one sweet boat you bought!

Pat
 
#3
Thanks Pat, as well as for some good anchoring info.
Yeah, the Pram is really sweet. Unfortuatley, I had to build a trailer, etc. and I've had the darn thing maybe 6 months, and only took the maiden voyage a week ago.
Very smooth on the water, and the experience of just the amount of **** I can have with me, as compared to fishing in my float tube, is amazing!
 

Krusty

Active Member
#4
Thanks Pat, as well as for some good anchoring info.
Yeah, the Pram is really sweet. Unfortuatley, I had to build a trailer, etc. and I've had the darn thing maybe 6 months, and only took the maiden voyage a week ago.
Very smooth on the water, and the experience of just the amount of **** I can have with me, as compared to fishing in my float tube, is amazing!
And being dry, without any body heat loss through submergence, will greatly extend your fishing hours during the shoulder seasons.
 

Irafly

Indi "Ira" Jones
#6
Not to mention the opportunity to sample adult beverages without having to go to shore for relief !
This times 1000.

How much extra space does 10'-20' of anchor rope take up? I have 50ish' on both my anchors, but I do wish at times that I had more, especially in heavier winds. I will agree with Buzzy with the type of anchors, but I'm to darn lazy most of the times to switch.
 
#7
I use 65' on my pram. One handy thing I do (at the suggestion of John Farrar) is to use a feed bucket - stronger than a regular bucket - to carry everything. I dump in the anchor(s), pullers, sponge for bailing, and all the line. It keeps it organized and makes it easy to carry and store.

Another thing I invest in is good quality line. I get the braided stuff used on sailboats. It is much easier on the hands.
 

Buzzy

Active Member
#9
secret lake.JPG

I really like the idea of feed buckets for loading and unloading the anchors, Scotty pullers, line, foam pads for my rods, pea bucket, etc. But I tend to keep the dish pan instead because of its low profile when I have it on the stern seat of my pram. I could keep the bucket on the lower deck but then I have big feet and there's not a lot of deck space.
 

Lue Taylor

Lue Taylor/dbfly
#10
This times 1000.

How much extra space does 10'-20' of anchor rope take up? I have 50ish' on both my anchors, but I do wish at times that I had more, especially in heavier winds. I will agree with Buzzy with the type of anchors, but I'm to darn lazy most of the times to switch.
Ira you forgot to tell him what color of rope you perfer:D
 

Irafly

Indi "Ira" Jones
#15
Lue, you know as well as I do his ropes are multi-colored spliced sections of different diameter and type..... those knots are really neat at the pocket pullers he uses. :D
I'll have you know, that although this statement is true in its nature, given how I tend to operate, I have newer white anchor lines! I did discover that black anchor lines do not work as well, it is harder to see them in the water, which makes it harder to set your angle and when a fish takes you around the anchor line it is harder to see how to unwrap it. So Lue's point is a valid one to make.