anchor

Discussion in 'Stillwater' started by m.albrecht@comcast.net, Apr 19, 2009.

  1. Preston

    Preston Active Member

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    I'm not trying to make a point here, just an amusing story about anchors. When I was a kid, every lake fisherman worth his salt had a couple of anchors, usually just cement filled coffee cans with an eye bolt or a heavy wire loop to attach the rope. My father came across a source of free lead and poured a couple of one-pound coffee can anchors which seemed like a good idea at the time. After anchoring up on the inaugural trip and fishing for a couple of hours, it came time to weigh anchor. Those two lead anchors had settled so far down into the lake-bottom ooze that it took a long, long time and much rocking of the boat to pull them up and out of the mud. We quickly went back to the concrete-filled cans. I don't recall how much those lead anchors weighed but they were much, much heavier than a comparably-sized concrete anchor and just kept sinking slowly into the deep mud of the lake bottom.

    I made anchors for my float tube from a couple heavy ball sinkers. I carried them around for a while but never did use them. I've always found it easier and more convenient to hold the float tube in position with the fins and found a definite advantage in being able to turn the tube quickly around, and not having a couple of anchor ropes out there to entangle the line and the fish during the fight.
     
  2. colton rogers

    colton rogers wishin' i was fishin'

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    Preston, so what your saying is to have a larger surface area, but to make ease of hoisting we drill holes in them. i think a 12 by 12 by 1 {inches} plate of lead with 6-8 one inch holes cut would work great.

    but remember to round the edges
     
  3. Jeremy Floyd

    Jeremy Floyd fly fishing my way through life

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    That chunk of lead you are describing is gonna weigh like 75 lbs Colton, even with the holes in it. A lead ingot slightly bigger than a twinkie is 5lbs.

    Lead is somewhere around 6.5 oz per cubic inch. What you described would be over 70lbs before you punched out 3-5 lbs of holes.
     
  4. cuponoodle breakfast

    cuponoodle breakfast Bigfoot is blurry

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    You can use just about anything. I'm currently using an old iron, similar to these.
    [​IMG]
    I've also used a 5lb dumbell, a bunch of chain, and various lead pyramids. A friend of mine uses a brake rotor.
     
  5. Ed Call

    Ed Call Mumbling Moderator Staff Member

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    I have a 10# musrhoom, it sinks well into soft muddy bottoms and the first few pulls is tough. I have an 8# mushroom, same story, but not quite as tough. I use one or the other on my pontoon but I've never used a second anchor to keep frowm swinging, I sue fins for that. Both hold me well in fairly choppy stuff with some wind. On my float tube I use a four pound lead ball from walmart. It is smaller than a tennis ball and weighs four full pounds. This holds my float tube very well in all conditions that I've tried it in and I'm wondering if a 4-6# ball like that would actually hold my pontoon too. With all the creative ideas in this thread I'm sure you can come up with something effective and even distinctive. Let us know when you are ready to deploy and hoist up that manhole cover sized lead plate. That could put a stress on your freeboard of the waterline on your craft. Irons, rotors, bricks, anchors, chain...the options are seemingly limitless.
     
  6. Birdsnest

    Birdsnest Active Member

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    The kind of bottom can make a big difference on the type and wt of anchor that will hold you. Rocky bottoms and a stiff breeze can be challenging. I have found Dry falls to be particularly troublesome. In worst case conditions I have a short section of steel H-Beam I use to hold my Al boat. It can be tough getting it out of the mud, but it never fails.