Anyone baking their own bread?

Discussion in 'Camping, Hiking, Cooking' started by IveofIone, Oct 12, 2010.

  1. Upton O

    Upton O Blind hog fisherman

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  2. gbeeman

    gbeeman Active Member

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    Here’s a recipe for Focaccia Bread that I make in my Dutch oven
    2 Cups warm water
    1 tablespoon yeast
    ¼ cup olive oil
    6 cups flour
    1 tablespoon salt
    2 tablespoons sugar
    1 cup yellow onion finely diced
    1 to 2 tablespoons fresh rosemary, chopped
    ¼ cup olive oil with 3 to 4 cloves of garlic in it
    Combine water and yeast. Add the olive oil, flour, salt and sugar to the water and combine. Knead in the onion and rosemary. Spread the dough in a greased Dutch oven and let proof.
    Brush top of dough with some of the olive-oil garlic mixture. Bake in a 12-inch Dutch oven with 8 to 10 coals underneath and 14 to 16 on top for 35 to 45 minutes (it will take longer if you start with a cold oven, I recommend preheating). During the last 5 minutes of baking, brush the top of the load with more of the olive oil garlic mixture.
    Bread should be golden brown and give a hollow sound when thumped. Remove bread from the oven and serve with butter, garlic butter, roasted garlic or olive oil garlic mixture.

    GBeeman
     
  3. ken2cross

    ken2cross Member

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    These were sure good tonight and you don't even need an oven:

    Homemade English muffins:

    18 muffins (approximately)
    1 cup milk
    2 tablespoons white sugar
    1 (.25 ounce) package active dry yeast
    1 cup warm water (110 degrees F/45 degrees C)
    1/4 cup melted butter
    6 cups all-purpose flour (I use 1/3 whole wheat 2/3 white)
    1 teaspoon salt
    Directions

    1. Warm the milk to room temperature or a little warmer and add half the sugar and the salt, In a small bowl, dissolve yeast and the other half of the sugar in warm water. Let stand until creamy, about 10 minutes.
    2. In a large bowl, combine the milk, yeast mixture, butter and 3 cups flour. Beat until smooth. Gradually add the rest of flour, or enough to make a soft dough. Knead. Place in greased bowl, cover, and let rise.
    3. Punch down. Roll out to about 1/2 inch thick. Cut rounds with biscuit cutter, drinking glass, or what ever you have. Sprinkle cornmeal on the surface you plan to raise them on and set the rounds on this to rise. Dust tops of muffins with cornmeal also. Cover and let rise 1/2 hour.
    4. Heat a lightly greased fry pan or ??? Cook muffins on griddle about 10 minutes on each side on medium heat. If the temperature is right they should just slightly brown, Always eat one while it’s hot. A little butter and jam will really get it going. Allow to cool completely if you plan to put them in plastic bags.

    Ken
     
  4. Trapper

    Trapper Author, Writer, Photographer

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    GBeeman, thanks for that recipe. I'll give that a try.

    Question: No first rising, correct?

    Trapper
     
  5. gbeeman

    gbeeman Active Member

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    Correct.

    GBeeman
     
  6. David Loy

    David Loy Senior Moment

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    Growing up, my best friends mother made bread 3 or more days a week. Tim and his brother and I would go through the first loaf in minutes. It was a honey wheat and the best bread I ever tasted. I've lusted after "Betty Lou Bread" ever since.
    I used to make bread by hand, and will agree it is a pleasant way to spend an afternoon. I still have the giant yellow bread bowl but don't have the time anymore, even though I cook every day. I shun many kitchen gadgets but about 14 years ago picked up a bread machine (a Zojirushi if you care). Almost immediately I found a honey wheat recipe and guess what, almost identical in taste as Betty Lou's. It's all I make and takes me 5 minutes to fire up a loaf and go on about my business. Four hours later, fresh bread that my family (& friends) rave over. Made a loaf this morning before the commute, so the girls could have fresh warm bread for lunch. I'm a convert.
     
  7. IveofIone

    IveofIone Active Member

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    Trapper, where did you get the baking trays for the ciabatta bread? I pretty much got the french bread wired this winter and would like to try some ciabatta for a change. Being such a soft dough that tray seems like it would be ideal.

    Ive
     
  8. Trapper

    Trapper Author, Writer, Photographer

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    I bought mine in a specialty shop in nearby Helena, MT. They are called perforated French bread pans.

    I did a search and found them on Amazon. http://www.amazon.com/Chicago-Metal...r_1_3?s=kitchen&ie=UTF8&qid=1366293922&sr=1-3

    Trapper
     
  9. IveofIone

    IveofIone Active Member

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    Thanks Trapper, That will make a fine addition to the chuckwagon here at the Rockin' K Ranch.

    Ive
     
  10. Gary Knowels

    Gary Knowels Active Member

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    I used to make Italian bread that I learned from my mom as well as clasic white and wheat bread for sandwiches until I went gluten-free for health reasons. I searched ofr almost a year to find a decent GF store bought or home made bread until I found one. Manini's Miracolo flour mix. Super easy recipe to follow and makes a bread that is closer in taste and texture to a good rustic bread than any other GF I've tried. I'm making 2-3 loaves per week now.
     
  11. Stew McLeod

    Stew McLeod aka BigMac

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    Well took me awhile, but this thread spurred me on to make my own bread.

    Before the Huskies game I made two loafs of Honey Whole Wheat. Turned out okay and taste great.

    I tried two different pans - one glass and one aluminum. I found the glass pan worked better. Anybody else use glass pans?

    Stew

    Sent from my Nexus 7 using Tapatalk 4
     
  12. Trapper

    Trapper Author, Writer, Photographer

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    For reasons unknown to me (I'm not a chemist or metallurgist) raw aluminum and yeast are not a happy couple. If you store your sour dough starter in aluminum it doesn't seem to grow very well. Glass or plastic works much better. It won't kill the yeast, but it seems to retard it. Consequently, I do my best to keep my dough away from aluminum. I have found that if the aluminum pan is coated, it's ok.

    If you're making any whole wheat bread and you don't put any high gluten flour in with it, it's likely to be pretty dense. If you're happy with the taste but want it less dense, add some "made for bread" flour.

    Trapper
     
    Jerry Daschofsky likes this.
  13. IveofIone

    IveofIone Active Member

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    Aluminum pans are great. For storing screws. They are rectangular and reasonably deep and offer enough surface area so you can easily paw through them looking for just the right screw plus their shape lends itself well to storing on a shelf or in a cabinet. They have no place in our kitchen.

    We bake bread at least twice a week and have for many years. Norpro pans are the gold standard as far as I can tell. They are dimpled steel and non stick. Bread bakes evenly all around instead of blond on the bottom and brown on top.

    No-knead sourdough is baked in a cast iron dutch oven and french bread is baked in the perforated double cradle that I believe Trapper turned me onto. Glass is certainly the lesser of two evils compared to aluminum but it is a dish rather than a pan and as such it takes longer to heat when first presented to the oven. Steel transfers heat much faster and contributes to the oven spring the bread needs to reach it's full shape quickly and helps the bread to brown more evenly.

    Ive

    Incidentally, probably the best bread of all is baked with no pan but on a pizza stone or hearth. Just be sure the stone is at maximum temp before the bread goes on. I usually preheat for about an hour before baking.
     
  14. Trapper

    Trapper Author, Writer, Photographer

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    Ive - I have no aluminum pans either. They are cheaper and lighter, but leave anything tomato based in them overnight and it will eat pinholes in it. I tried cooking with an aluminum Dutch Oven once. (The outfitter thought they weighed less for packing) It was awful. The bread was near burnt on one side and near goo on the other side. To be fair it was in a fairly stiff cool breeze but my cast DOs never did that.

    I'm glad you like the perforated baking pans. Toss some semolina on them before putting the dough in them for a crunchier crust. I do that with my Ciabbata bread.

    Do you know why aluminum retards yeast?

    Trapper
     
  15. Jerry Daschofsky

    Jerry Daschofsky Moderator Staff Member

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    I bet it's a chemical reaction. Most aluminum really don't have a patina. So bet there's something in the aluminum that hinders it's process. No idea, but I know growing up my grandparents never used metal to make dough or starters. Always was glass or clay. My one Grandma used to make her own hard clay pots to store the sourdough starter in. But don't recall them using any metal for their bread products, except their baking pans. And if memory serves me, my one Grandma always had cast iron baking pans. Her bundt pan weighed a TON.

    Oh, I'm all with you on the aluminum DO. I will say, they are SUPER light. My 12" hard anodized DO weighs just under 5#, where my 12" CI DO weighs just over 20#. Nice on float trips. Usually toss two in the box and use as a multi use pan. But, you're right, sucks for heat retention. Heats up fast, cools off faster. Get a good wind and you better have a damned good wind block.