bamboo rod ID

Discussion in 'Bamboo, Fiberglass & Classic Reels' started by ibn, Dec 26, 2005.

  1. ibn

    ibn Moderator Staff Member

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    I have an uncle who used to be the art directory for a TV show called Northern Exposure. One of the props on the show was a bamboo fly rod. As he was cleaning out his shop over the weekend he came across the rod and sent me a pic of the logo.

    I don't know much about bamboo rods, wondering if this is worth anything, if anyone can even ID it. :)

    Sorry for the mediocre quality of the image.
     

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  2. Northlake27

    Northlake27 Member

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    I would say Horrocks and Ibottson, middle of the road production rod. Similar to South Bend or Montauge.
     
  3. Salmo_g

    Salmo_g Active Member

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    H&I is similar to Montegue, and have never seen one I would want to fish with. South Bend were fairly nice production rods; I have two and like one of them.

    Sincerely,

    Salmo g.
     
  4. Zen Piscator

    Zen Piscator Supporting wild steelhead, gravel to gravel.

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    The one word that I can see is "tonkin" which is a type of bamboo. This means whatever the manufacturer, the boo is of fairly good quality.

    Peace,
    Andy
     
  5. Porter

    Porter Active Member

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    Yeah it looks like the word Horrock...so I think Northlake 27 is right.
     
  6. Kent Lufkin

    Kent Lufkin Remember when you could remember everything?

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    Ibn, as other have suggested, most HI's were low-end rods. With the exception of a few premium models or those in mint condition, their prices in the market reflect the generally low opinion that most cane rods fans have of them. Here's a little history of HI rods.

    BTW Andy, almost ALL bamboo rods are made from Tonkin cane. Over the years various makers have tried using the inferior Calcutta cane, but virtually none ever saw production.

    K



    Horrocks-Ibbotson was one of America's largest production rod companies for many years, competing head to head with Montague and South Bend. This company that came to be known as the World's Largest Manufacturer of Fishing Tackle traces its history to 1812 but did not become involved with fishing tackle until 1863 when an English immigrant named James Horrocks was hired as a clerk. In 1894, Edward Ibbotson was hired as an errand boy. Gradually the company acquired existing tackle companies. In 1905 the company built a new factory in Utica, New York and continued to grow until it was known throughout the world. The firm was incorporated in 1909 as the Horrocks-Ibbotson Co.

    The rods made by Horrocks-Ibbotson in the years up to 1935 filled every niche in the rod making business. The high grade rods such as the President and the Chancellor featured nickel silver fittings and were as good as any rods being produced by the competition. At the other end of the spectrum were the cheapest production rods. H-I made literally hundreds of different models throughout the years, and many had such minor differences in fittings and wraps that they were indistinguishable without direct comparison.

    Decals are useful for dating Horrocks-Ibbotson rods. The diamond with the UTK logo dates from 1905 until World War I. This logo is usually stamped into the reel seat, but also appears as a decal. The Trout logo decal was then used until 1929. It is rarely seen and is the most beautiful of the H-I decals. Next to appear was an elongated Double Diamond with Utica, NY inside; it was used until 1933. In 1934, a double-diamond logo including the banner reading Best by Test was introduced and was used until 1939. Next came the fanciest of all H-I decals featuring a bright red H-I on a white diamond and accompanied by two banners reading Fish Rod and Genuine Tonkin Cane. The decal of the early 1950's was rectangular with a small gold foil diamond logo. The final decal was a simple red diamond with a large white H-I.

    If you are trying to identify a rod that has no decal, the writing of the model name is helpful. H-I used white ink, and usually wrote with the words running toward the grip. The only other maker that used white ink was Edwards, who usually wrote with the words reading away from the grip. The reel seats did not change much; the spacers were usually solid color plastic before World War II, and marbleized plastic after the war. As with all rods, the most recent H-I products are those most commonly seen in the market.
     
  7. Tim Cottage

    Tim Cottage Formerly tbc1415

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    Definately Horrocks Ibottson.
    There is absolutely nothing inherently wrong with H&I rods as fishing tools. They were mass produced by the jillions and are typically worth somewere between $5.00 - $100.00

    Here is some info about H&I

    Horrocks-Ibbotson Rods

    Horrocks-Ibbotson was one of America's largest production rod companies for many years, competing head to head with Montague and South Bend. This company that came to be known as the World's Largest Manufacturer of Fishing Tackle traces its history to 1812 but did not become involved with fishing tackle until 1863 when an English immigrant named James Horrocks was hired as a clerk. In 1894, Edward Ibbotson was hired as an errand boy. Gradually the company acquired existing tackle companies. In 1905 the company built a new factory in Utica, New York and continued to grow until it was known throughout the world. The firm was incorporated in 1909 as the Horrocks-Ibbotson Co.

    The rods made by Horrocks-Ibbotson in the years up to 1935 filled every niche in the rod making business. The high grade rods such as the President and the Chancellor featured nickel silver fittings and were as good as any rods being produced by the competition. At the other end of the spectrum were the cheapest production rods. H-I made literally hundreds of different models throughout the years, and many had such minor differences in fittings and wraps that they were indistinguishable without direct comparison.

    Decals are useful for dating Horrocks-Ibbotson rods. The diamond with the UTK logo dates from 1905 until World War I. This logo is usually stamped into the reel seat, but also appears as a decal. The Trout logo decal was then used until 1929. It is rarely seen and is the most beautiful of the H-I decals. Next to appear was an elongated Double Diamond with Utica, NY inside; it was used until 1933. In 1934, a double-diamond logo including the banner reading Best by Test was introduced and was used until 1939. Next came the fanciest of all H-I decals featuring a bright red H-I on a white diamond and accompanied by two banners reading Fish Rod and Genuine Tonkin Cane. The decal of the early 1950's was rectangular with a small gold foil diamond logo. The final decal was a simple red diamond with a large white H-I.

    If you are trying to identify a rod that has no decal, the writing of the model name is helpful. H-I used white ink, and usually wrote with the words running toward the grip. The only other maker that used white ink was Edwards, who usually wrote with the words reading away from the grip. The reel seats did not change much; the spacers were usually solid color plastic before World War II, and marbleized plastic after the war. As with all rods, the most recent H-I products are most commonly seen.


    TC

    WHoops, looks like Kent beat be to it on this one by about two minutes. I guess that pretty well illustrates the difference between chugging along on a dial up and having a real internet connection. Almost certainly we both went to the same web site to copy this write up and that site takes freakin forever to load on a dialup
     
  8. Porter

    Porter Active Member

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    Kent and Tim.....
     
  9. ibn

    ibn Moderator Staff Member

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    Thanks guys.