Bass fishing on the fly

Discussion in 'Warm Water Species' started by Roper, Jan 13, 2003.

  1. Roper

    Roper Idiot Savant

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    My dear daughter bought me a Bass Pro Shop fly tying kit for Christmas. At first I thought "what am I gonna do with this?" Then it dawned on me, tie some bass flies and go fishing. I used to go bass fishing a lot back in New York when I was younger and it was fun. Some times the obvious is not so obvious at first, but the light has shined on me and I'm eager to try out bass fishing on a fly.
    So here's the question, anyone else hitting bass around here? Where's a good lake to start both east and west side?


    Roper,

    Truth above all
     
  2. Old Man

    Old Man Just an Old Man

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    The thrill is not in the kill---But to let them go.

    There's a lot of lakes around here with Bass in them. Just go to www.washingtonlakes.com and you will find a ton of info on fishing for Bass. There's info on all types of spiney ray fishing. And since you live in Everett you have a few close to you. Such as Rosinger,Bosworth,Flowing,Silver,Panther. Only Bosworth has a set season on it the rest are open year around.

    Jim
     
  3. troutpocket

    troutpocket Active Member

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    I caught some decent smallmouth while fishing for trout in Lk Goodwin last spring. They liked a black #10 WB with lots of sparkle. Fished near the bottom around weedbeds. Also lots of yellow perch and pumpkinseeds in there. Perch especially liked a #8 muddler minnow.

    Rod
     
  4. pwoens

    pwoens Active Member

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    Tons of fun...of course my old man is the only one between us who has actually caught a large mouth bass on the fly. It looked like a ton of fun though. We are going to try it more this coming summer. he caught his on a top water frog imitation. It was like a freight train on the end of his 6wt :thumb

    good Luck and let me know after you try it?? Or if you make it over to the east side we have a bass boat that we could take out and go catch some large mouth hogs.

    ~Patrick ><>
     
  5. hikepat

    hikepat Patrick

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    I spent many a fun days fishing for bass with my fly rod this past summer during July and August. Most of the bass I caught were between 8"-14" with a few bigger. It was a nice change of pace when the water is warm and fishing for trout can be hard on the fish due to warm water temps. I fished only on Lakes from SouthWest Washington up to King county lakes so I can not give you lakes up by Everett. Most of the time I just fished lakes close to my home in Des Moines. The lake itself did not make much diffrence for my catch rate. I would catch between 8-40 fish each time out using mostly leech patterns along the shore lines and around sunken logs. The best fishing was normaly from 6-8 PM so it was easy to go fishing after work on one of the lakes close to home. If you have not tried bass on a fly give it a try its lots of fun when they start jumping after being hooked. I am still waiting to hook into a really big one and I plan to try again for that 8LBS or bigger one this summer.
     
  6. cmtundra

    cmtundra New Member

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    I had a lot of fun this summer & early fall catching largemouth off the surface with muddler minnows. I fished from my bellyboat on Sequalitchew Lake, mostly in the lilypads.
     
  7. Bart

    Bart New Member

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    Other than pleasing your daughter(important) why would you want to waste your fly fishing skills on such a lowly fish. I had much higher hopes for you. They are an evil species. They eat the fry of the noble Salmonids and Char. They reproduce like rabbits and eat each other out of house and home, fight like seaweed and, according to many folks (at least those who admit to eating fish - imagine that!),don't taste very good. All that being said, if you really intend to pursue this vile species, consider the following.

    Jim's and other Westside lakes mentioned are good. Add Silver Lake South of Olympia, and Cranberry on Widbey. East of the mountains, any lake that is not actively managed by WDFW for trout has potential. Any lake with flow from Lower Crab Creek, below Potholes Resevore (Seep Lakes area)has Bass and other despicable species.

    These scum sucking, trout crowding fish eat the same bugs as trout and a lot of offerings that will scare a decent trout into a hole. Big and noisy top water poppers (yellow, like a grasshopper, blue like Damsels/Dragonflies), leeches and anything that upsets them. A long time ago, in a county far, far away, the best was a purple or black jelly worm, rigged weedless. Perhaps the famous Rocky Ford Bunny Leech, tied skinny and weedless?

    If you must continue in this madness, let me know. Perhaps together we can make the waters safe for the Trout.

    Bart

    :thumb
     
  8. Roper

    Roper Idiot Savant

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    As Mac would say, "quit, you're killing me". Bart, your post cracked me up. It reminds me of the Perch-a-thon my buddies and I had at a pay for play lake two years ago(the last time we ever went there). It seems Isaak Ranch had been plagued with perch some how and they loved the new secret nymph I had tied dozens of to slay the local trout(which wasn't happening). I normally won't harm sentient beings just for sport, but after the twentieth or so perch we started perch Olympics. There was the long flying fling, the triple spinning slap, the upside-down belly slash, and the fly rod fling. After all was said and done, our guide Darce Nobel(very good guy) took home a string of fatties to fry up at home. So you could say I'm trained in trash fish warfare and would enjoy your company on such and expedition.

    Roper,

    Truth above all
     
  9. chadk

    chadk Be the guide...

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    Just remember - today's 'trash fish' may someday be our future 'sport' fish or maybe a protected species. Think chum, dolly, etc... (guys are still in the habbit of killing any 'garbage' dolly they catch on the skagit and tossing aside...). That being said, I can think of a few 'olympic' games I enjoyed partcipating in with a bunch of unlucky nothern pike minnows :beer2
     
  10. hikepat

    hikepat Patrick

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    Its funny here is Washington Bass are called a trash fish. Talk to someone from the Great Lakes area and its a game fish that most like to fish for more then trout. Me I am happy catching any and all fish and they are all game fish. In the South fly fishing for sharks is considered sport fishing maybe someday fishing for dogfish on a fly rod will be all the rage. Many on this site allready talk about Carp. Fishing a lake by the Hood Canal bridge this last September I myself was the only one on the lake fishing for trout the rest were after Bass. One of them even made a coment to me that trout were the trash fish fly fishers all can have and to leave the real sport fish for them. I did not tell him that I already had caught 20 or so Bass and had started fishing for trout only after hooking into a huge Trout while bass fishing. Oh well to each their own I guess. :smokin
     
  11. Roper

    Roper Idiot Savant

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    Fishing is fishing

    You're right, one man's trash is another's treasure. When it comes right down to it, I like most all fishing. I've gotta rank on something don't I? Ferrcrissakes man, I'm from NY!

    Roper,

    Truth above all
     
  12. dlw

    dlw New Member

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    One thing to think about is that bass are not native to Washington (well neither are most of the trout in our lakes). So for the most part they are trash fish, but I wouldn't say their any lower than any of the planted rainbows. On lakes that would otherwise only support populations of sculpins and suckers, bass are not a bad addition. They kind of screw up the lakes natural ecosystem though.

    Back to the original topic, I don't know of many bass lakes, becuase I mostly fish for them in zipper lips and private lakes. Just explore a little and you will find that most of the lakes around here will hold a few. As for flies (largemouth bass), I like to use large foam bodied poppers since foam floats longer and I like to see the take. Subsurface I have done well with big zonkers and sculpin patterns, and when I say big, I mean at least 3-5 inches long. I've had a 6 inch largemouth srike a plastic worm of equal size, so they're definently not afraid of big flies.
     
  13. alpinetrout

    alpinetrout Banned or Parked

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    I had the same thing happen at Isaak last year. Those were the biggest and most expensive perch I've ever caught.
     
  14. recycle fish

    recycle fish Guest

    I grew up in Iowa, and until the past year, all of my experience with a fly rod in my hand has been for the 'warmwater species.' The holy grail of fish for me to catch on my fly rod prior to this year was bass. (I have recently gotten into fly fishing for trout, and anticipate trying for steelies and salmon).

    So here's my advice - bigger is better. For numbers, you could tie up some stuff under size 2, but I always like big bugs. And the surface is the only way to go for excitement, if they'll take on the surface, so big foam frogs, wounded fish, or snakey-looking things are great. But this time of year and in many instances, even in summer going sub-surface is the only thing that will work. So then leeches or sunfish patterns seem to be best. I have learned to use a heavier leader because of all the snags that bass like to hang out around. And I personally like a long leader, in most cases it's not too tough to turn it over, since the fly on the end is so big and heavy. I don't like using real feathery stuff (sometimes leeches can be like that) because when it's so big it casts like a windsock. Probably another reason I like foam or wood popper frogs on the surface.

    Since I am catch-and-release only though, I love fishing for carp, and will go out of my way to do so! :D I really appreciate the comments about 'trash fish.' :eek: I never imagined that bass were considered that, anywhere!

    I also wanted to add that although I have posted only rarely, I read all the posts on this site every day and have learned an incredible amount from all you guys! Your posts are helpful beyond measure to someone new to this area and these different (to me) fishes. I'm always impressed by the great attitude and good spirit of guys (and girls) on this site, I enjoy my time here endlessly, which I can't say is true of other NW fishing sites I've visited, so kudos to everybody.

    Kind of glad that there's finally a subject I can contribute something on. :thumb

    -Teeg
     
  15. T Dub

    T Dub New Member

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    I never imagined Bass would be called “trash fish” either. They are the main sport fish where I'm from. And it's definitely fun to catch them in all their fatness.

    I've also eaten them, and bad taste never entered my mind.

    It's funny to see the view from different parts of the country. Of course I know nothing about how they affect trout populations and such.

    I too prefer fishing for trout though.

    TDub