Beach access limited at BP?

Discussion in 'Saltwater' started by Sourdoughs, Aug 16, 2011.

  1. Evan Burck

    Evan Burck Fudge Dragon

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    I shall answer this challenge by asking you to visit washingtonflyfishing.com/board

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  2. bennysbuddy

    bennysbuddy the sultan of swing

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    I saw the very same situation when I rented a beach house on port susan . The crowd would come the cops were called and tickets were cited. After a few days the cops became tired of the whole game and quit coming then the fish moved on and so did the circus. That said I always looked forward to the whole thing I'd sit on my deck and have a few beers watching the rich landowners freak out,Nevermind that none of them ever ventured out on the beach but god help the general public that showed up to enjoy the public access. Of course in the winter when they needed people to help sandbag the bulkheads from high tides & flood water the public was totaly expected to come down and help save their precious house.
     
  3. knotabassturd

    knotabassturd New Member

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    True Evan, but flyfishers are snobs in general so it is OK :)

    What I hate is when one gear newbie guy next to me hooks and lands a fish, starts calling everyone, then ten minutes later a dozen people not knowing what they're doing, what the regs are, etc show up piling in next to them (and me) to try and catch a fish.
    Never happens with fly guys and gals. Happens sometimes (rarely thankfully although in pink season it is high season for it) with gear guys.
    With that bad stuff said, MANY gear guys obviously are extremely talented with their fishing capabilities and do a ton of fishing, follow the regs as they should, etc.
    It's just that there is a small contingent of them during pink season that break out the 5/0 barbed hook and brand new $15 combo rod (uh, I mean 'pole')/reel with the plastic wrap still on the cork base and proceed to call everyone they know to come on down if they actually catch a pink.
     
  4. Brooks Werner

    Brooks Werner Member

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    The major issue aside from trespassing is the amount of trash being left behind on people's property. None of us would want that on our property and I'm sure these people don't either. Seems like a typical case of a few people ruining it for everyone else... Unfortunately this fishery has become extremely popular and its almost impossible to find a quiet place to fish anymore.

    On a side note, I saw a fly guy yesterday drag a fish to shore (on private property), bonk it and run back into the water without recording it to get back to the pod cruising by.
     
  5. knotabassturd

    knotabassturd New Member

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    PS- on the land thing if someone owns the land and tidal area then who am I to tell them I can use their property if they don't want me to? There are other areas to fish.
     
  6. constructeur

    constructeur Active Member

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    Darling, don't argue with me in front of the children.
     
  7. Steve Saville

    Steve Saville Active Member

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    I disagrre completely. The fact is,we own 190 feet of beach and are taxed on every inch. You think they're going to reduce my tax bill if they take away my beach rights? Think again, my friend. I pay for the right to own and control that property. God, don't get me started.

    An add if you don't mind: We own to the "mean" low tide line. That's the average for those who don't remember their math (no disrespect intended). Think of it this way and I've written this at least three other times in similar posts. If you owned a corn field and a bunch of hunters started hunting pheasant on your land before or without your permission, what would you do? Would you allow them to do it or would you politely or not so politely, ask them to get their asses off the property?
     
  8. kpsully

    kpsully Member

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    "Someone needs to take the Washington tidewater access issue to the highest court." -Bob Triggs

    Seriously Bob? Can you elaborate?
     
  9. Earthy

    Earthy New Member

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    There is absolute accuracy to the claims that there is one woman putting up ropes, raising a stink, and involving the sheriff's dept. That said there are some super generous fisherman whom have worked their whole lives to live there. One in particular, has been absurdly generous about public access to his beach. And I do mean his beach. He is taxed an ungodly amount to live there, to the tune of thousands a month. And when "BENNYSBUDDY" makes claims about the rich people not even using their beach but 'freaking out' when others use it - I wonder if he'd still be sitting there enjoying a cold one while the sheriff pushes people back off his place?
    It's not all that comfortable when there's 30+ people in your front yard swinging buzz bombs, when asked to make room so that you might throw one or two - being told "its awfully crowded". Or your grandkids are pushed off the beach. Conversely, what's he going to do when the sheriff does push everyone back, sit down there in front of everyone who's been pushed away - that's a day-killer too.
    The depressing reality today is that "choosing to believe the best in people" leads to being grossly taken advantage of.
    The sheriff told those homeowners that if they didn't give "written permission" to the trespassers, just as in hunting, the sheriff would be enforcing the public access and trespassing laws. The land owners along that beach have had to put up with litter, car alarms going off at 4am, driveways being blocked, roads being blocked, cars and trucks parked on their lawns, strangers in their yard, strangers camped out 10 feet from their patio and at times using their patio, loud and foul language, trespassers threatening their dogs and them, graffiti, vandalism, and until this year- almost zero law enforcement.
     
  10. salt dog

    salt dog card shark

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    Water access law is a huge area, and is hotly contested currently in many states and continues to evolve. Washington State can not presently convey tidewaters out to private citizens. However, those whose predecessors received deeds for shoreline property prior to that time from the state, or from a federal patent deed, frequently if not usually received the adjacent tidelands and do hold the right to bar persons from crossing over or upon the tidelands contained in their deed. In other places, it is illegal to bar persons seeking access to public water ways for fishing. Battles rage seemingly continuously in Montana over similar river access issues. The issues are complex, and is the type of litigation that can only be engaged in by individuals or groups with LOTS of money....like Ted Turner, etc., in the Ruby Valley, MT.

    Tidelands were granted to Washington when it became a state in 1889. The state began selling off tidelands, a practice it continued until 1971 when the Legislature prohibited further sales. Private ownership of tidelands and shorelands is limited to those parcels which were sold by the state prior to 1971. Today 60% of tidelands in Washington State are privately owned:
    Trivia:
    1. American Indians are allowed to harvest from private tidelands (2nd class), a percentage of naturally occuring (not planted) shellfish.
    2. The difference between 1st and 2nd class tidelands is not quality, it is distance to the city limits of an incorporated city.
    3. Everyone has the right to use the surface of the waters. Period.
    4. The state issues permits for buoys (sometimes) on state-owned tidelands as long as it does not interfere with boating traffic.
    5. The state can and does lease tidelands.
     
  11. Go Fish

    Go Fish Language, its a virus

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    Good in depth comments from Jim. I own
    class one tidelands and am fortunate
    not to have any public access points
    near by. The only people that walk
    my beach are neighbors or friends of
    them. The unwritten rule is pick up
    nothing on a beach that isn't yours
    unless you ask first. Never had any
    issues in 11 years but thats because
    of the limited access which keeps the
    public out.

    I would ban the pink hunting hoards
    from my beach.

    Dave
     
  12. bennysbuddy

    bennysbuddy the sultan of swing

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  13. rymo

    rymo Member

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    Love the varied commentary. As somebody who has a family cabin on the water, I definitley land on the side of homeowner privacy. As others have said, think how you would feel if a gang of people were suddenly hanging out on the sidewalk in front of your house at all hours of the day. Just because it's a beach, doesn't mean the rules don't apply - these are people's homes. Most are not wealthy, they are homes that have been passed down or are owned by several families, so don't turn this into class warfare :)

    I am also lucky enough to have a family friend on the beach at BP. I manage to maintain fishing priveledges by cleaning up my mess, respecting their privacy and giving them 50% of the catch (cleaned and ready to cook).

    If you are looking for a private spot to fish, you'd be amazed how far a quick conversation, a $10 coffee card, 6 pack of micro-brew or some Salmon would go. I'd say that most homeowners are happy to share the beach, but when the disrespectful & obnoxious folks come out, camp all day, leave trash, etc - patience wears thin.

    There is a reason many people see fisherman as dirty rednecks and don't want them/us near their property. Let's do our best to change perceptions.
     
  14. ten80

    ten80 Active Member

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    No attitude, take a chill pill dude. The people who give fishermen a bad image typically fish gear and the fishermen people generally don't mind to have on their beaches are more than likely fly fishermen. There are obviously exceptions to this generalization.

    I don't understand the attitude of some people that they are "entitled" to fish off any and all beaches that suit them, even if they are private. Rich property owners or other rationalizations don't matter, you DO NOT have any right or entitlement to trespass.
     
  15. kpsully

    kpsully Member

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    you're absolutely right: then, it was all peaceful. And, yes, the police have better things to do - if people could park legally, pick up after themselves, not mess with what's not there's, and not act like children, it'd be fine - fun even.