Beach access question....

Discussion in 'Saltwater' started by Bradley Miller, Sep 23, 2012.

  1. Rich Schager

    Rich Schager You should have been here yesterday...

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    "... otherwise most people dont bother paying the taxes for the tidelands".

    I live on the waterfront, and I've neve heard anyone ever say or do that !
     
  2. Steve Saville

    Steve Saville Active Member

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    Me either. I own 200 feet of bulkhead and the existing tidelands to the "mean low tide "line. I can't imagine not paying the taxes because they are not calculated seperately. They are calculated on the lots that the bulkhead is on. I'd lose my two beach lots to the county tax rolls. There are clams and geoducks there but many of the beaches in Pierce County are closed to digging because of Red Tide possibilities. That being said, our beach is open to walkers and fishermen as well as long as the beach is respected.
     
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  3. Pat Lat

    Pat Lat Mad Flyentist

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    All I know is that my dad has property on the water in shelton and he has to pay taxes on his tidelands, the guy next to him has a lot that he wants to build a dock on but cant because he doesn't have rights to the tidelands. My dad also raises oysters and clams on his property and can lease beach rights to other oyster farmers because when it was my grandfathers property he had the option to pay the extra taxes on the tidelands and include them as part of his property and be free to build a dock.

    That being said the beach rights issues are so convoluted and each property was bought or built at seperate times in different areas that its impossible to have even a general guideline about where you can or cannot go.
    some people own the tidelands and some don't. Plain and simple
     
  4. Bradley Miller

    Bradley Miller Dances with fish

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    For the time being, I have elected to use public parks for access: that seems simple enough and keeps me busy enough that I don't yet have ' beach envy'.
    HOWEVER; before too long I am going back to Hood Canal and try to schmooze my way onto some tidal property and see what happens. Thanks for the info!
     
  5. Steve Saville

    Steve Saville Active Member

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    By not paying his taxes the guy forfieted the ownership of the tidelands. Our taxes are based on the two lots that touch the tidelands and as such, we own the tidelands to mean low tide. The ownership of tidelands depends on the time of sale, etc. The property that we own along with my wife's sister and husband has been in the family since 1934 so the ownership is somewhat different than others because of the time of purchase. There are so many different rules, laws of ownership, etc. that they are very convoluted as suggested. Let's go fishing! Ask before you walk but most people will allow a courteous person to traverse or stand on their beach.
     
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  6. Tony James

    Tony James Member

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    Hi Brad,

    Good question my man . . . I've solved two issues with my kayak! I launch it right there in Hoodsport (by the dive shop - public) and paddle myself over to the hatchery (5 minutes). Of course, I love to walk the beach with waders and a stripping basket, but that pales in comparison to getting out in my yak and chasing the finny one; away from the buzz bombers, positioned with the wind at my back, rockin with the waves, etc., etc. You will love it - the feeling of being free from the beach is absolutely amazing!
     
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  7. Bradley Miller

    Bradley Miller Dances with fish

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    Funny you should mention that........
    I have kayaked a little, and I like it alot. I never really associated kayaking with fishing though......big mistake, I think. On my 'list' of things I want to do (SOON) is to pick up a pontoon boat. So my question to you is: if you can kayak in hood canal, can you pontoon boat as well? Or is that foolish? Obviously, I'm not much of a boater, but I have kayaked for a couple of days in the Strait (near Salt Creek....I wonder if there are cutthroat there by the way.......) and across Ozette and even a little out of Neah Bay (I was with friends who are pros). Pontoon boats are relatively cheap; not so much with kayaks. Thoughts? Thanks, by the way! :)
     
  8. Tony James

    Tony James Member

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    Hi Brad,

    Sorry I didn't get back to you sooner - been chasing the franklins. If you launch a pontoon boat, you'll have lot's of company - plenty of guys do it. Those schools of chum move around a bit, so having the ability to move off shore and around with them makes the chase even more exciting. I've never had to say the fish were out of range when I'm on the water with them. obviously the wind can be a factor, probably not a bad idea to plan a little anchor management. it's not too deep there and the schools patrol around the bouys quite a bit - once you get there and scout the jumpers and the surface activity you'll be able to plan what you want to do.
     

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  9. Chester Allen

    Chester Allen Fishing addict and scribbler

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    Well, I'll chime in here.
    There are lots of public beaches in South Puget Sound and Hood Canal, and previous posters have shared good information on how to find those beaches. Truth is, it's hard to find a bad beach for sea-run cutts -- if you take the time to learn how each beach fishes during different tidal stages. Some beaches fish better when the tide is falling, while some fish better when the tide is rising. Some fish well on both tides. Learning beaches is a lot of fun.

    I do 90 percent of my fishing on public beaches. A boat or kayak solves all access problems, although you've got to watch the tides carefully, as it's hard to paddle back to the car over a mud flat. A tide table is a must. I think beach anglers do have some advantages over boaters, mostly in that you can position yourself to fish rips and dropoffs from different angles, and you can fish rips that are close to the beach easier. I love fishing from a boat, but I prefer standing on the beach.

    As for access to private beaches, it never hurts to ask the property owner for permission. Many owners welcome fly anglers, and it always helps to say you won't leave anything behind but footprints. It's a good idea to give the property owner a little present from time to time, such as a restaurant gift certificate or even a few bottles of beer.

    In any case, welcome to our weird, wonderful world!