Beginner tier

Discussion in 'Fly Tying' started by VTDryFly, Nov 30, 2017.

  1. VTDryFly

    VTDryFly Member

    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2014
    Messages:
    86
    Likes Received:
    10
    Location:
    Poulsbo, WA
    hi I was wondering what fly tieing equipment is essential for begging out and if there is recommendations for starter kits that are nice and not cheap and just crap bundled up and sold. I saw orvis has a beginners kit for both fresh and salt (would mainly want for fresh) but didn’t know what you guys think or what I should be paying for price wise.
    Thanks
     
    svira likes this.
  2. John Parker

    John Parker Active Member

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2015
    Messages:
    125
    Likes Received:
    112
    Location:
    AR
  3. Squamishpoacher

    Squamishpoacher Active Member

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2009
    Messages:
    334
    Likes Received:
    650
    Location:
    Parksville, BC
    Good advice in that referenced thread. IMHO, most kits are money poorly invested. Find a club nearest you and join. The money spent on a membership will pay greater dividends than that spent on a kit. Get a decent vise that grips hooks well, a good ceramic tipped bobbin and a good pair of scissors. Start on some larger hooks like a #6 or #8 and go from there. Practice on a pattern or two that you like to use and buy the materials for them and after you've got them down expand your portfolio. Don't go cheap on those 3 tools but get ones that will work at a modest cost. Nothing is more frustrating to tyers new or experienced than a vise that won't hold a hook, a bobbin that breaks thread or scissors that are not sharp. Search Youtube videos for advice and to test your abilities. I never had such a rich resource when I started and there is time well spent there.
    Good luck!!
     
  4. VTDryFly

    VTDryFly Member

    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2014
    Messages:
    86
    Likes Received:
    10
    Location:
    Poulsbo, WA
    Hey how does this toolset look? Is this one ceramic i get conflicting answers online.

    https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B002...g+tool+set&dpPl=1&dpID=51LP+K-yPZL&ref=plSrch
     
  5. Ron McNeal

    Ron McNeal Life's good!

    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2008
    Messages:
    1,214
    Likes Received:
    1,365
    Location:
    Poulsbo, WA
  6. Tim Cottage

    Tim Cottage Formerly tbc1415

    Joined:
    Dec 9, 2003
    Messages:
    2,479
    Likes Received:
    985
    Location:
    Outer Duvall
    This kit looks like a great deal. I say buy it now if you are serious about getting started.

    I wouldn't concern myself about ceramic or non-ceramic bobbins. After a lifetime of tying starting long before ceramic bobbins were available I have numerous non-ceramic bobbins that have never frayed a thread. I'm sure there a many other long term tiers who would agree.

    TC
     
    Ron McNeal likes this.
  7. VTDryFly

    VTDryFly Member

    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2014
    Messages:
    86
    Likes Received:
    10
    Location:
    Poulsbo, WA
    Are the scissors sharp in this set? Does anybody be own it
     
  8. Squamishpoacher

    Squamishpoacher Active Member

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2009
    Messages:
    334
    Likes Received:
    650
    Location:
    Parksville, BC
    The older Materelli bobbins we used to get without the ceramic tips and only paid about $3 for were excellent. I've found that new ones are nowhere near the quality.
     
  9. Ron McNeal

    Ron McNeal Life's good!

    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2008
    Messages:
    1,214
    Likes Received:
    1,365
    Location:
    Poulsbo, WA
    I'm out....................
     
  10. Tim Cottage

    Tim Cottage Formerly tbc1415

    Joined:
    Dec 9, 2003
    Messages:
    2,479
    Likes Received:
    985
    Location:
    Outer Duvall
    In the unlikely event that the scissors are not up to your expectations the amount you will save on this kit will allow you to afford another pair.

    TC
     
    Ron McNeal likes this.
  11. John Parker

    John Parker Active Member

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2015
    Messages:
    125
    Likes Received:
    112
    Location:
    AR
    No, on beginner sets the scissors are dull to help build the muscles up in your hand and so you don't cut a finger off or something else.
    You'll know when it's time to get sharp scissors.
     
  12. tyafly

    tyafly Member

    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2009
    Messages:
    283
    Likes Received:
    419
    Location:
    Oly
    Joining a club is a good idea. Hanging out (and spending some money) at fly shops is a great way to gather knowledge.

    As for scissor, these are my new favorite fly tying scissors. They are not for really small stuff or shaping, but I seem to reach for my "fly tying scissors" less and less since I started using these. I got them at wally world in the sewing aisle. I think they were around 10 bucks. Also most synthetic materials out there, you don't want to cut with a fine blade "fly tying" type scissor. They will go dull super quick.
    http://www2.fiskars.com/Products/Cr...ears/RazorEdge-Micro-Tip-Easy-Action-Shears-6

    What kind of flies are you wanting to tie? The kit that Ron linked to is a smokin' deal. If you need some fur and feathers to get started send me a PM.
     
  13. FT

    FT Active Member

    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2005
    Messages:
    1,447
    Likes Received:
    333
    Location:
    Burlington, WA
    Do yourself a favor and use the search function of the forum to look up beginning fly tying, beginner fly tyer, starting fly tying, etc. There is a wealth of info already posted in prior threads that will be very useful, informative, and helpful to you.

    In general, fly tying kits are poor economy. You are better off buying a fly tying tool kit from Griffin Enterprises. It will have a good vise, good, sharp scissors, good bodkin, good whip finisher, good bobbin, good bobbin threader, and a good hair stacker included for under $100.00. All the tools included in the Griffin tying tool kit will last the average fly tyer a lifetime.

    For materials, the best thing to do is start with simple flies like Grey and Brown Hackles, Woolly Buggers, and similar flies that only use 2 or 3 materials. Buy hooks in 2 at most 3 sizes that you will use with these flies, the hackle, chenille (or wool-which you can get at a big box store's yarn area), and some black 70 denier tying thread.

    Then simply add to your materials as you tie another fly pattern that requires a different material.

    Also, if you wish to tie dry flies, don't start with them. And when you do start tying them, buy #3 necks, not #1 necks or saddles because you really don't need all the really small sized hackles. Virtually all commercial/professional tyers of trout flies buy #3 necks because they are heaviest in the sizes most used and are less costly than the #1's.

    And for wet flies, it is hard to beat hen necks. Steelhead flies are best tied with Chinese Rooster Necks, or things like Whiting American Hackle. In other words, use hackle appropriate for the type of fly you're tying.

    And never tie just one of any given pattern, always tie at least 6 of the same fly pattern and size before changing to something else. Your tying will improve most quickly by doing so because you will learn what you need to do to make them look good and the technique to tie them well, plus you always have plenty of flies to fish with.
     
  14. Old trout

    Old trout Active Member

    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2015
    Messages:
    63
    Likes Received:
    51
    Location:
    Renton - for now.
    FT gives very sound advice , start slow and get the best quality materials you can afford. Also keep in mind , tying materials don't just come from fly shops, craft shops are good sources also. Be aware, you are about to embark on a very addictive journey. Have fun. Look forward to seeing some of your flies.
     
  15. LyNcH

    LyNcH Steelhead Junkie

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2009
    Messages:
    186
    Likes Received:
    23
    Location:
    Duanesburg, NY
    Where in Vermont are you?
     

Share This Page