Best SRC/Resident Coho Rod & Reel?

Discussion in 'Saltwater' started by freestoneangler, Jan 8, 2012.

  1. Richard E

    Richard E Active Member

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    Porter speaks big medicine. Rod selection is not always about the fish; the weather and environment conditions, the distances you want to cast and fish, and the size of the flies you expect to use should be big factors.

    A fast 5 works, but a it's tough to beat a 6 wt for all-around Puget Sound use. You can use it virtually all year and have it work fine for you 99% of the time.
     
  2. Nick Clayton

    Nick Clayton Active Member

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    If I had to choose just one rod to cover all of my beach fishing, (SRC, rezzies, summer/fall silvers) I would go with my XP 691. A little heavy for smaller fish, but I'm always glad to have it when a bit of a breeze comes up.
     
  3. Bob Balder

    Bob Balder Willing to learn anything...

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    For me it is all about being prepared for the certain eventuality of the wind blowing and hoping that one day a black mouth sneaks up on me....
    Imuse a 9' 6wt. and RPL, it is pretty fast and I have no issues losing fish, well I do... but I don't think has anything to do with the rod.
    I too use a Lamson, it seems bullet proof in the salt and like Leland, I fish with a weight forward floater and a clear intermediate. I also agree with Curt's assesment that resident Coho and SRC can behandled with a four wt., for me it is pretty much about casting, manding and dealing with the wind.
     
  4. Paul Potter

    Paul Potter Member

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    Dustin, love my Z switch w/a litespeed and a slow outbound for the beach.
     
  5. DimeBrite

    DimeBrite MA-9 Beach Stalker

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    Listen to Stonefish, buy 2 rods for fishing Puget Sound. As you get more experience you'll want to target bigger fish in the saltwater and a 4 wt or 5 wt will leave you weeping one day. Even an 18 inch blackmouth is too much for a light fly rod.

    Rod-#1: 9'6" med-fast action 6 weight rod with a fighting butt

    Rod-#2: 9'6" fast action 8 weight rod with a fighting butt

    The quality of reel won't matter for small cutts and rezzies, but a good reel is vital to land silver or chinook salmon over 3 pounds. If you skimp on the reel you will get smoked (like my Lampson velocity 2 versus a 13lb chinook). I love the light weight Bauer reels for the saltwater. They perform really well with bigger salmon and are tough.

    Get extra spools for a floating line and a clear intermediate sinking line. I use my saltwater rods/reels for freshwater river fishing too, salmon & steelhead.
     
  6. freestoneangler

    freestoneangler Not to be confused with Freestone

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    First off, thanks for the feedback everyone! It seems like the 9'6", 6 weight is the slight favorite. Dustin -- interesting option to consider a switch, but I've promised myself to stay away from these...if I add switch rods, just having gotten into spey rods, my head might explode :eek:

    Yesterday, I was using my Sage RPL 690 and an SA System 2 because I happened to have a spare spool with a 6 weight Ty II intermediate line. With the exception of not having stainless components on it (I built the rod a number of years ago), the rod would probably work fine with a better line. I always clean up equipment after salt use, so doubt I'd have problems there. I also have a Lamson V2 and recently found a spare spool for it that I could buy a new line for. I was thinking this might be the reel I set-up. Do most of you fish SRC's and Cohos with sink or float lines?

    I really like Dimebrite's last comment -- this certainly would save on having too many duplicates of rods and reels for fresh and salt use... but then one can never have too many.. right;)

    Thanks
     
  7. Jim Wallace

    Jim Wallace Smells like low tide.

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    Uh oh, you're startin' to think like a gearhead!:clown::beer1: Myself, I am immune to such extravagances. No, I just lied. :beer2:I am now in the process of putting together a dedicated Redtail Surf Perch Rig, but that is a spinning outfit for chucking lead over the waves. The same fly gear one uses for cutts would work for the Redtails, except the line should be a good fast-sinking shooting head.
     
  8. Mike T

    Mike T Active Member

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    Lamson, any model. Great brake, great price point and do well in the salt. I've never had to send one of these back for repair.

    Lines, floating shooting head lines gives you the most options, if you want to get down just throw an intermediate polyleader on or carry a spare spool.

    6 wt, 9'6" Sage One. Occasionally I'll grab a 5wt when there's no wind and I'm confident all I'll find are cutts and rezzies. An 8wt switch with a scandi head is great fun for chum.
     
  9. bimini twist

    bimini twist Member

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    We're selling my spouse's Hardy Zenith 9 ft. 6 wt., which is a great rod for fishing SRC and coho. The rod is fine in the salt, as it has an annodized aluminum reel seat. The rod is in excellent condition.

    See the Classified Ads. We just reduced the price to $395, including shipping. A great buy for someone.

    Cheers,

    Bryan
    Portland, OR
     
  10. Don Freeman

    Don Freeman Free Man

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    Spot on of course Leland. I include a fast sinking shooting head for boat fishing in current.
     
  11. Chester Allen

    Chester Allen Fishing addict and scribbler

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    I think a sea-run cutt rod and reel is a pretty personal decision. I like a 6-weight rod with a little flex in the tip and backbone toward the butt. I think a lot of anglers overestimate how far they have to cast to reach fish. In fact, I see lots of anglers standing the water where the fish usually hang out.

    A decent reel with a smooth drag will be fine. I think your choices of line are more critical. I carry a floating line, a clear intermediate and a depth-charge sinking line. I use the intermediate most often, as it sinks just below the surface and gives me a sensitive connection to the fly. I like the full sinker because some really nice cutts spend their lives right on the bottom, especially on sunny Puget Sound days. And the sinker also gets down to the fish when tidal flows are strong.

    Good luck!

    Chester
     
  12. Greg Armstrong

    Greg Armstrong OldRodsHaveMoreFun

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    If you like modern gear, all the above suggestions are good.

    I like to use older, traditional gear though and so I'll stick my neck out here a little for anyone who might be interested and tell you what I use when beach fishing.

    I have an 8 ft., 4-1/2 oz. 3 piece Orvis Battenkill impregnated bamboo rod that was made in 1967. It is marked "HDH" (6 wt.) or "HCF" (7 wt.) and I find that the 6 wt (I use a floater exclusively) works best on it for me.

    The many cutthroat I have caught on it in the Sound don't seem to care that it's not a high tech'. modern marvel, and I really enjoy fishing with it. It cost me less than most of the new gear noted above ($350-used) which may surprise many (Orvis made a lot of bamboo rods, and there's always a lot on the market it seems, although this particular model can be a little harder to find because people hold onto them) It didn't come with its original tube, but somehow that doesn't seem to matter to the fish either. I use an older British made Orvis Battenkill reel on it and both are still in great condition, given minimal care by rinsing and using quality reel lube.

    When I go out on the Sound in the boat I take graphite as boats are a little tougher on the bamboo out on the salt water. Otherwise I use traditional gear wherever I fish because for me it's just more enjoyable.

    Just thought I'd throw this out there as another option to think about.
     
  13. Chester Allen

    Chester Allen Fishing addict and scribbler

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    Hey Leland,
    The book is out, complete with your contribution of your popper information. Can I send you a couple of copies via mail? I won't be in the Seattle area for another couple of weeks....

    Thanks for your help!

    Chester
     
  14. freestoneangler

    freestoneangler Not to be confused with Freestone

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    Interesting you mention bamboo. My wife bought me one last year for my B-day, an Orvis Battenkill Impregnated, 8', HCH, 4-1/4 oz. I would have never thought to use it for saltwater -- been keeping it for a Sunday driver. I've only lawn cast it this past summer and it has a sweet stroke...might need to give it a try on SRC outings. :hmmm:
     
  15. Banzai

    Banzai FFing and VWs...Bugs & Bugs

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    I'll toss my hat in with the "just off the beaten track" crowd. Lately, I've taken to fishing SRCs a lot with my old Heddon 6/7 wt fiberglass or bamboo rods and "vintage" reels. I prefer a WF floating line cut back, looped, and using poly leaders with it. Mostly I prefer clear floaters and hover/ intermediates. If I really want to reach out and touch fish, I grab a 12' 5wt two-hander with a Rio Outbound floater/polyleader setup.