Best type of Spey rod for beginner

Discussion in 'Spey Clave' started by Tom Arroll, Jan 11, 2008.

  1. Tom Arroll

    Tom Arroll Member

    Joined:
    Jun 6, 2005
    Messages:
    295
    Likes Received:
    12
    Location:
    Seattle, WA
    Hi All,

    Thank you so much for all of the insignful suggestions. As for Stan no offence, I realize my post was asking quite a bit. Thankfuly most of the responders got the jist of what I was asking for and provided helpful input. As for my overhand rods I have a variety, all have their place regardles if they are my favorite rod. As for starting off on a new area of fishing I am not affraid to invest in a rod that might not be my absolute favorite rod. In fact contrary to good advise I am considering taking the plunge and buying a Burkenheimer. why you might ask? Perhaps it is because I appreciate quality handcrafted items, perhaps I might be experiencing a mid-life crisis. If I don't like it maybe I will keep it anyway or perhaps I will sell it at a discount to Stan.

    Best Regards,

    Thomas
     
  2. FLGator

    FLGator Member

    Joined:
    Jan 25, 2005
    Messages:
    655
    Likes Received:
    2
    Location:
    PNW
    Thomas,
    You've made a decision you will not regret. Congratulations on "doing it right the first time".
     
  3. Red Shed

    Red Shed "junkyard spey"

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2006
    Messages:
    517
    Likes Received:
    6
    Location:
    Peck, ID
    Home Page:
    Midlife crisis' are not bad, I've had many of them.:cool:

    Burkies are a great choice, as the guy is very good at what he does. Your only problem now id deciding which Burkie. Vanilla, Chocolate, or I like Pralines and Cream. Have fun!
     
  4. Red Shed

    Red Shed "junkyard spey"

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2006
    Messages:
    517
    Likes Received:
    6
    Location:
    Peck, ID
    Home Page:
    Midlife crisis' are not bad, I've had many of them.:cool:

    Burkies are a great choice, as the guy is very good at what he does. Your only problem now id deciding which Burkie. Vanilla, Chocolate, or I like Pralines and Cream. Have fun!
     
  5. Mike Rupp

    Mike Rupp New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 30, 2007
    Messages:
    21
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Bellevue, WA
    Tom, did you cast the Burkie? If not, I think buying a rod without having cast it first is a bad idea. With the options that you have here in the Seattle area to try out rods before you buy them, you should really try the rod first. Like someone mentioned, a spey rod is a much different animal than a 9' trout rod.

    I was in the same boat you are in a few months back. I tried several rods while taking lessons from Aaron:

    Meiser MKS 12'6" 7/8/9
    Z Spey
    Burkheimer 8141
    CND Skagit
    CND Steelheader
    Winston BIIx 13'3" 7/8
    Sage 7136 Z-Axis

    When I picked up the Burkheimer, I was sure that I would end up wanting to buy the rod. It was a magnificient rod. When I cast it, I just couldn't cast it consistently. You might end up liking the rod, but you'll never know unless you cast it. Get out there on a Saturday and try some rods.
     
  6. Coach Duff

    Coach Duff Banned or Parked

    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2004
    Messages:
    1,272
    Likes Received:
    6
    Location:
    Kailua Hawaii
    Not to be a smartass, but if you've never cast one before, buy whatever you want. With no bad habits, no prior rod knowledge or feel for different actions, the rod you buy will be the rod you learn on and it will feel good. It's all you will know. So what the hell, call Burkheimer or Meiser and get a piece of art. I am partial to them for many reasons, but you need to buy what you feel good with. Then get a good mentor or instructor to teach you the right way and you'll love the rod. By then again once you figure it out, you'll love your Echo, your Snowbee, your Sage, your Loomis, your Scott, your Winston, your C&D your ????????? Get the picture. Just make sure you know what time of year, what species and what application you are aiming at. For jack of all trades i go fishing once a week guy a Skagit capable rod (MKS or Burky or about a dozen others) with tips is pretty hard to beat both for effeciency and easyness to learn. Just a thought. Coach
     
  7. Mike Rupp

    Mike Rupp New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 30, 2007
    Messages:
    21
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Bellevue, WA
    Not to be a smartass Coach Duff, but I take you to be the kind of guy that would marry a woman without sleeping with her first and then get divorced later when you found out she wasn't what you expected. :)
     
  8. hendersonbaylocal

    hendersonbaylocal Member

    Joined:
    Aug 29, 2005
    Messages:
    971
    Likes Received:
    3
    Location:
    Seattle WA
    Something wrong with that? :beer2:
     
  9. Will Atlas

    Will Atlas Guest

    luckily divorces from spey rods are alot less messy than those from women. it just involves posting a classified add, putting the rod in the mail and buying a new one. Try before you buy though man. I've got a SAGE 8139 which is my second rod. I would say the rod is good to learn on but also has a relatively high ceiling in terms of performance, I plan on using it for a long time

    Will
     
  10. o mykiss

    o mykiss Active Member

    Joined:
    Sep 12, 2001
    Messages:
    1,478
    Likes Received:
    390
    Location:
    .
    I don't often agree with Coach ;), but I do in this case. I am not sure what someone who knows nothing about speycasting can learn by going out and trying 3, 5, a dozen or however many rods before buying a stick he wants to learn on. I know if I had done that it would have meant nothing to me. I think if you go to a good spey shop, let them know you are a beginner, and what your price point is you have to trust that they will put you into something that will work. You will almost certainly end up with a set up that fits the general description that Poppy and others on this thread offered up. I do think it is important to get advice from someone who knows what they're doing, and dealing with shops like the Red Shed, River Run Anglers, AATF (and I'm sure others) increases the odds that you will end up with a stick you can learn on. I think this whole notion that you have to find a rod that matches your casting style is a bit of a red herring when you don't have one (i.e., casting style). Plus, with work, anyone should be able to learn how to cast a rod of any action, as long as its properly matched with the right line (and that is where most of us need the help - picking the right line). People who gravitate to one action or another will, when making that next purchase, go to the rod that best approximates the type of action they like, but that doesn't mean that a person who prefers a medium action, full flexing rod to a fast action rod can't figure out how to cast the faster rod, as long as he's willing to put in the work. At least that's my personal experience.
     
  11. Coach Duff

    Coach Duff Banned or Parked

    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2004
    Messages:
    1,272
    Likes Received:
    6
    Location:
    Kailua Hawaii
    Or Rupp, you could think you know about marriage, "try the woman out" (The ladies love that kind of talk) realize she is great in the sack and get married. 5 years later you realize that when you are not having sex you can't stand each other. And you get divorced anyways. But with a spey rod, if you know nothing about spey casting, you can learn to love the rod in both the sack (Skagit style, down and dirty, low and slow, sinking that tip in the "bucket" ) and while interacting at home (dry line, up on the surface, a bit superficial in nature, but warm and comfortable in the relationship. Maybe even setting up for an afternoon nap together in the sun." Not to be a smartass though.:beer2:Duff
     
  12. Mike Rupp

    Mike Rupp New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 30, 2007
    Messages:
    21
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Bellevue, WA
    Let me get this straight, are you guys advocating not trying a rod before purchasing? So if the opportunity is there to try a rod, you think its better to go to a fly shop and just trust their judgment?

    I just don't understand this kind of logic. Sure, there are plenty of guys out there that live nowhere in the vicinity of someone who lends out rods to try. I fully understand rolling the dice there, but this guy lives in Seattle. He is a whopping 30 minute drive from more rods than you could even want to cast.

    To each his own.
     
  13. FLGator

    FLGator Member

    Joined:
    Jan 25, 2005
    Messages:
    655
    Likes Received:
    2
    Location:
    PNW
    If you don't know, you don't know.

    Trusting the judgment of a first rate spey shop to get you set up with a balanced outfit, based on what you think you like, and then getting out there and learning is ok.
     
  14. Coach Duff

    Coach Duff Banned or Parked

    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2004
    Messages:
    1,272
    Likes Received:
    6
    Location:
    Kailua Hawaii
    Easy Big Mike. He can try all the rods he wants. But since he can't cast one, and doesn't know shit about spey casting he'll probably buy one for the color scheme or what some shop salesman tells him he needs. All we are saying is that is doesn't matter right now. The one that he buys is the one he will learn on, become proficent with and catch fish with. His world is wide open right now.:beer2:Duff
     
  15. Richard E

    Richard E Active Member

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2001
    Messages:
    4,585
    Likes Received:
    193
    Location:
    Seattle, WA, USA.

    iagree I usually am a big proponent of 'try before you buy', but I would agree in this instance. Because I am in the same situation.

    I am a pretty fair hand with a single hand stick, but wouldn't be able to tell a fair spey rod from a good spey rod from a great spey rod. I would trust to someone's advice, like Aaron's, and learn on that stick. You all know how long we don't keep our rods any more, so it's not like the dude will likely keep the rod for a long time, anyway, or want to.

    My first premium single hand stick as a Loomis IMX. I cut my fly casting teeth on it, and it was a great stick. I had it built, and had never cast one before I bought the kit. Wasn't a problem, because I didn't have the casting skills at the time to determine if there were any problems.

    I think a person could feel relatively confident that they will be acquiring a nicely-performing rod if what they purchase is a relatively upper end model from a reputable manufacturer. I would apply that logic to single hand rods, and I'm guessing it might have some validity with spey rods, too.