Pattern Bloodworm patterns?

Discussion in 'Fly Tying' started by steve s, Feb 7, 2007.

  1. steve s

    steve s Active Member

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    Can anyone give me a couple of recipes for bloodworm patterns? I have quite a few chirinomid patterns of different colors with and without gills but I don't have any bloodworm patterns.
    Any help is appreciated.

    Thanks,

    Steve S
     
  2. Jeremy Floyd

    Jeremy Floyd fly fishing my way through life

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    [​IMG]

    I just get the micro chenille and melt the ends w/ a lighter or a candle and then tie it in and dry brush it red w/ fingernail polish. It still moves around in the current but doesnt come apart nearly as easy w/ the polish on the outside.

    Those are size 14's
     
  3. seanengman

    seanengman Trout have no politics

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    Vernille is the only way to go with the san juan worm. Throw a bead on for little extra sink. My favorite hook is a size 8 3x long natural bend, it gives a little bit more of a natural shape.
     
  4. SuperDave

    SuperDave New Member

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    A bloodworm IS a variant of a chronomid. Chronomids are among the most abundant insects in our waters.

    My favorite "Bloodworm" pattern is tied on a Tiemco 2457 in sizes
    #14-#10. It has a holographic red tinsel body overwrapped with clear Stretch-Magic with a peacock hurl thorax and a small white bead head.

    SuperDave
     
  5. landshark

    landshark New Member

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    I just tied some for a swap on another web site. Here is the recipe i used.

    Hook- dai-riki scud #8
    Thread- 8/0 red
    Body- larva lace orange
    Head- 1/8 bead black
    Thorax- peacock hurl
    Tail- orange z-lon

    I am waiting for my flies so I can try them out.

    I am interested in your chirinomid patterns. I would like a few to tie.

    thanks,
     
  6. steve s

    steve s Active Member

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    Thanks for the recipes fellas, after reading what you guys are tying I realized that my patterns are all similar. One of the only differences that I can see is the hook choice, I usually use a TMC 200R and I saw that you all use scud type hooks.
    I tried my patterns yesterday at Lone Lake and I didn't have much luck. I landed three and hooked a couple more but that was it. Meanwhile there were four guys fishing under indicators and they were slaying the fish. Seriously, they landed more fish than I could count. I think that my flies were a bit too big, sizes 12-14 tied on 200R hooks and I think that if I tied the same patterns on scud hooks sizes 14-18, that might do the trick. The 200R hooks look so much bigger than a scud hook of the same size because of the long shank so that might help me out.
    Thanks again for the recipes and I'll try to get some pics up when I tie up a new batch this week.

    Steve S
     
  7. fishyfranky

    fishyfranky New Member

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    If you're zoned into the chironomids, especially with an indicator for precise depth control, then you can catch lots while others are getting skunked or just a few. I've landed 60 fish in 8 hours and the handful of other fishers got just that: a handful all together.

    My stillwater bloodworm pattern are usually on #10-#14 Daiichi 1150's or Mustad 3399A's. The TMC 200R shanks are too long and you will hook less and lose more fish.

    Bloodworms don't have thoraxes or any of the other doo-dads that I've seen on "bloodworm" patterns. Here are two of my favourites:

    Daiichi 1150 #12 with very small transparent read beads and Sally Hansen Hard as Nails coating for deep water:
    [​IMG]

    Daiichi 1250 #12 with red holographic tinsel, mono rib and Sally Hansen Hard as Nails coating for shallow water:
    [​IMG]
     
  8. Sourdoughs

    Sourdoughs -Marc Chapman, icthyoantagonist

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    Fishyfrankie, the two hooks in the pictures look incredibly alike. Why use these two diffferent types (I haven't looked up the difference yet)?

    Thanks,
    Marc
     
  9. Jeremy Floyd

    Jeremy Floyd fly fishing my way through life

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    Looking at them and speculating I see one has a pinched barb and one is factory barbless. Also the lower hook looks like it is made of finer wire.
     
  10. fishyfranky

    fishyfranky New Member

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    The #1150 pattern is for fishing +10ft deep for big fish with 3-4x tippet and strong hooks. The thick wire and glass beads help it sink faster and the weight is enough for the vertical lift/settle technique, i.e. jig ;) . Bloodworms are very thin but at that depth or more, a little fatter design is more visible and catches more fish.

    The #1250 pattern is for fishing shallow -4ft deep silt flats for smaller fish on average. But these fish are spookier and harder to fool. The bright light means you have to stay truer to the thin form and switch to 5x tippet. The lightness of this pattern makes it dance and wiggle, especially if you use a small no slip loop knot.

    So the two patterns are suited to two different situations. They are "supernatural" patterns, that is, somewhat attractive yet close enough to the naturals to catch wary/pressured fish.

    If the fish are really aggressive then I use an App's Bloodworm or other pure attractor first to quickly pick off the bold and the dumb.
     
  11. Sourdoughs

    Sourdoughs -Marc Chapman, icthyoantagonist

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    Excellent! Very interesting, something I hadn't thought about when tying my chirno patterns. Thanks!
     
  12. Wayne Jordan

    Wayne Jordan Active Member

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    I'm really liking the red bead pattern! I think I just found a use for all the red craft beads I have collecting dust. Thanks for sharing that with us!
     
  13. Randy Diefert

    Randy Diefert aka: Longears

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    Those are nice tyes but, I don't think that they compare to a Liquid Lace Blood worm tyed with micro clear lace on a Mustad 80150BR swimming nymph hook using a Opaque Red base underneath.
    That fly is deadly!!!
     
  14. Flyn'dutchman

    Flyn'dutchman Member

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    Have had really good luck this spring with blood worms tied on 2302's. Either simply wrap red wire up the hook and tie off with red thread or use the red holographic mylar with a mono or red wire rib.
     
  15. Pat M

    Pat M Chasing Tiger Trout

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    I like to use a Tiemco 200R in a size 20. Just a thread body with a built up head. I also use Sally Hansen's Hard as Nails to give it a glossy look. It worked great this past weekend with Mike Doughty in Wyoming.