Boat Features, Fly Fishing, Puget Sound

Discussion in 'Watercraft' started by jsuyes, Nov 3, 2007.

  1. jsuyes

    jsuyes FFF-CCI

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    Wow,

    Im surprised this thread got resurrected. Thanks, fellas, for taking time to put in your comments. I have learned alot. I think i know about what im going to get and how im going to outfit it.

    One question though:

    What's an RBI? Im guessing a rubber inflatable like a Zodiac?

    John
     
  2. Kim Hampton

    Kim Hampton Not Politically Correct

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    I bought a 17' Trophy center consol this spring. A center consol gives you a cleaner deck for fly fishing I feel. It doesn't give you much weather protection so I don't think the boat dealers sell a lot of them through the year in the NW. I've had it in enough weather where it has almost hurt when running and stayed dry from the spray so the hull seems to be a fairly good sea boat. Like the Whaler the bow is really clean for casting. I figured I got into this boat 5 or 6 grand cheaper than a Whaler with the same amount of power.

    I've already rewired the trailer lights to the led style. Seems like I had trouble with the lights from the get go. I probably should have taken it back to the dealer but just upgraded the lights instead. No problem with them so far.

    Along with all the required safety equipment I wear at all times an inflatable life vest as I fish alone most of the time. Puget Sound is cold no matter the time of the year. Your cheap light Danforth style anchors don't work well as far as I'm concerned. Get some weight in your anchor. A VHF is good to have as I see a fair amount of cell phone dead spots in the Sound. I've installed a combo gps chart plotter fish finder (Humminbird 997si). To me it's more of a fishing tool over a safety device. Or if you really get down to it.....it's a fun toy.

    My next purchase for the boat will be a trolling motor. I haven't made up my mind of a small kicker vs a bow mount electric. Opinions??

    So I've bought the boat and I'm fairly happy with it.....then I go on vacation down south and see the Panga style of boats. If I had it to do all over again I'd take a look at this one really strong (http://www.panga.com/assets/pdf/07_P17_PDF.pdf)
    or maybe at their other line up of boats (http://www.panga.com/). To me the 17' looks like it would be a great Sound boat. Price isn't bad either.
    I guess once you start you will always be looking for the next best thing. Kind of like fly rods.
     
  3. BFK

    BFK Member

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    Kim-- On the electric trolling motor: you probably be happier with a bowmount rather than a transom mount. I've got both and have found the bowmount a better choice from the standpoint of control. The transom mount motors don't have the torque to really steer well, in my opinion.

    Someone once compared using a bowmount vs. a tiller this way: "It's a lot easier to pull a rope than to push a rope." Pushing a rope is the way I've felt at times using a transom mount electric when trying to position a boat in wind and current. The downside, besides increased cost, is that a bowmount electric is more clutter on the casting deck.

    And I think you're right, a panga would be a natural for the Sound. If you want to get more ideas, check out www.microskiff.com as it has a thread or two with some pangas pictured in it.
     
  4. johnnyrockfish

    johnnyrockfish Member

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    An open aluminum skiff will be easy to tow and easy to power. A heavier hull like a whaler/parker etc will ride better. Pangas are efficient but they are not great riding in a chop like we get in the sound.

    Definitely use 5200 on sealing your transom. The idea of using epoxy isn't bad to seal the transom material but still you want 5200 or boat life in there because it stays flexible. The epoxy will crack and let water into the transom. Don't use silicone!

    You may not need to through bolt your kicker motor but definitely tie it to the boat.

    Whalers are unsinkable but it doesn't mean they won't ship water over the bow. I like the Outrage 18 or 20 from 1982- 1990. Great riding hulls that go very shallow and are much lighter than the new ones. Parkers are excellent boats. Carolina Skiff makes a V hull called a Sea Chaser. I own one of these. It rides well for it's size. No wood construction is nice. Not a high end boat but it serves my purposes well with plenty of room on the forward casting deck.

    Anyone know a local supplier of "real" poling poles? I use a long dowel but it's not really long enough.

    Have fun.

    JR
     
  5. martyg

    martyg Active Member

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    Whalers are not unsinkable. A busted up hull may keep you out of the deep in calm water, but not in larger breaking waves - especially with a larger outboard.
     
  6. Roger Stephens

    Roger Stephens Active Member

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    JR:

    I use an adjustable fiberglass painters pole which will not corrode for a poling pole. When it is collapsed, it is about 4 1/2 ft. long and easy to stow.

    Roger
     
  7. johnnyrockfish

    johnnyrockfish Member

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    Roger - thanks for the tip.

    MartyG - maybe I've seen too many marketing photos of Whalers cut into two or three pieces and still floating so I believe that they aren't sinkable. Apparently you've seen one sink. I'd like to hear that story.

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  8. Richard E

    Richard E Active Member

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    Rigid Bottom Inflatable (the inflatable boats with hard bottoms).
     
  9. hendersonbaylocal

    hendersonbaylocal Member

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    That scenario is obviously in fairly ideal conditions. In breaking waves, yes the boat will probably be at least partially submerged and likely not stable enough to be of any use. In reality though, in those conditions the Whaler is going to do better than almost anything else out there. I'd rather be clinging to a few pieces of partially submerged fiberglass and foam than a chunk of aluminum floundering two feet under water and only being held afloat by a bit of styrofoam.
     
  10. johnnyrockfish

    johnnyrockfish Member

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    I think it's been since the late 70's or early 80's that all boats under a certain length are required to have level flotation, so theoretically all these boats are "unsinkable".

    Prudence at sea should keep you out of the worst situations. One thing the coast guard drills into your heads is the importance of staying with the boat even if it capsizes. That's a good thing to keep in mind. It makes it easier to spot for rescue and you may be able to get back on top of it. etc.

    Safe boating to everyone. Wear your pfd's and carry a good anchor and plenty of line.

    JR
     
  11. Don Freeman

    Don Freeman Free Man

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    You're always going to have to make some compromises, but the basic concerns are: a low free board, for effective casting, stripping and landing fish, big enough for the number of people you'll have in the boat most of the time, a clear deck and rails to reduce the line snagging. You will want a bow anchor, and an auxiliary motor of some kind. I definitely appreciate my gps when it gets foggy, but a hand held will save your butt with out the expense of an installed unit. I have both vhf and a cell phone on board, but you can get some sweet hand held vhf radios later if you think you need it.

    How big of water will you be going out in? How much range do you need? What's your budget? What else will you use the boat for, and what do you see yourself doing in 5 five years? What do you tow with, and how often will you really use it? I sold boats for a living for years, and these are the first questions I always asked.

    All that said, I am very satisfied with my 15' Whaler Dauntless. Center console, bow mounted anchor. That puts the riptide troll motor, and a gas kicker aft, which doesn't work as well as a bow mount (except I put it on an extension bracket for more purchase) but you want to have at least one end of the boat clean enough for distance casting in the wind. 60 hp injected 4stroke with 15 gals of fuel give me gobs of range, and with the weight of the hull, it is a real kidney saver in the short order chop we get in the sound, and on nasty days I feel very secure, as this model is self bailing. I've taken some nasty green water over the bow, but all I have to do is snivel and wait for it to drain.

    There's some really good advice on this post, and boat show season is coming right up, so your timing is just about perfect. If you don't go new, the dealerships get a lot of sweet deals in on trades that they'll want to get rid of in February and March.

    happy hunting