Boat for fishing the sound and lakes

Discussion in 'Watercraft' started by mtskibum16, Aug 26, 2011.

  1. Jerry Daschofsky

    Jerry Daschofsky Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2003
    Messages:
    9,253
    Likes Received:
    2,121
    Location:
    Graham, WA, USA.
    Home Page:
    I grew up with Hilakers. Damned good boats, and except for running out in the big blue or buoy 10 you'll be more then happy with a 14' Hilaker in the rivers, lakes, Puget Sound, and harbors around here. Keep thinking we had a 16', but I have a feeling it was closer to 14'. Either way, was a great boat and held up well through all the storms we put her through in both Grays Harbor and Puget Sound.
     
  2. martyg

    martyg Active Member

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2005
    Messages:
    1,291
    Likes Received:
    260
    Location:
    The world at large
  3. mbowers

    mbowers Active Member

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2008
    Messages:
    402
    Likes Received:
    310
    Location:
    Jupiter, FL / Victoria, BC
    If you're actually looking at a flats boat, you should look at an Egret. Freakishly good ride in a chop and just generally really well laid out for fishing. Lockable rod lockers, self bailing cockpit (very few boats truly have this) and massive amounts of storage. It probably will not be good for downrigger trolling as the back 5 feet are all decked over, but if you'll just be casting and bucktailing it's tough to beat for fishing functionality and smoothness of ride..

    http://www.boattrader.com/search-re...33458/Radius-any/Make-EGRET/Sort-Length:DESC/
     
  4. mtskibum16

    mtskibum16 Active Member

    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2008
    Messages:
    1,583
    Likes Received:
    791
    Location:
    Puget Sound Beaches
    Well took the boat out a bunch this weekend so I thought I'd update this thread with my first thoughts. If you missed it above the boat is a Coho 13' 4" (Boston Whaler copy) with a 40hp Yamaha. I was very impressed with the boat overall and I think it will suit my needs just fine.

    The first day I cruised around the local waters including between Bainbridge Island and the Kitsap Peninsula up to Poulsbo in Liberty bay - maybe about 18 miles or so. A good amount of wind/chop but the boat handled it well even with 4 people. The second day was in more isolated and calm waters and this is where the boat really shined. We did about 30 miles exploring all over Dyes and Sinclair inlet. Again, even with 4 people it jumps right up onto plane and cruises great. The final test was yesterday when my wife and I did close to 40 miles and ran from Bremerton clear over to Seattle (Duwamish waterway). It's definitely not the most comfortable ride across the sound and you have to keep an eye out for the bigger waves but we still averaged about 25 mph for the trip over which is pretty good. Made the whole 40 mile trip on one 6 gallon tank of gas with some to spare so I am pleased with that. The boat is incredibly easy to launch and load by myself. It's also very stable to stand and fish from anywhere on the boat. If I wanted to cross the sound on a regular basis something larger would be in order but I don't really see that happening so it's not a big deal.

    Overall I think it will be perfect for it's intended purpose (fishing the local beaches for SRC and salmon) with one passenger or by myself. At under $5000 with plenty of extras I just wish I would have bought one sooner!
     
  5. LCnSac

    LCnSac John or "LC"

    Joined:
    Aug 29, 2011
    Messages:
    1,173
    Likes Received:
    367
    Location:
    Sacramento, CA
    Home Page:
    I've had three Whalers; a 13' classic pre-smirk, a 13' Dauntless, and a 170 Montauk. Loved all three for different reasons. The 13 classic will jar your fillings. It's stable all the way but rough. It's a complete blast to run with a 40 but performs with a 25 nicely. The small Dauntless which are now hard to find has a greater deadrise and a V-hull entry and as such cuts through chop beautifully but the secondary stability is not good. The 170 Montauk runs WOT at 42 mph and has outstanding initial and secondary stability. That boat is a little big for the smaller lakes that I often fish and better for bays, sounds, and ocean work.

    For the Sound and lakes, I'd be looking at a 15' Whaler. That may be the best boat they ever built. The only drawback is poor secondary stability as that's a V-Hull boat. It looks totally cool at rest though, and takes chop beautifully. Those run around $5000 - $8000 with a 2 stroke. Another choice is a classic Montauk. They have lower freeboard which I prefer for fly fishing, are rougher than the 170 and have less room inside, but are light enough to power with a 60 although a 90 is better and stable as a 13. Those you can find for $9000 - $10,000 with a four stroke; about $3-$4K less with a 2 stroke.

    If you want to feel safe anywhere on the Sound and have the money, a 170 Whaler with a Merc 90 is pretty hard to beat. You wouldn't think twice about a run from Seattle to Victoria in decent weather. You can find a pretty good one for around $20K.

    When I lived in the San Juans I ran a 14' Hi Laker from Roche Harbor to Sidney and back several times a week, mostly at night, and never gave it a second thought. That doesn't mean it was smart! Radio, flares, oh hell no. Today I wouldn't do it that way, but now I realize I'm not invincible. The Whaler makes you feel safe and secure because it is--it will bring you home when other craft may not.
     
  6. Javabean

    Javabean Silverlining

    Joined:
    Sep 25, 2008
    Messages:
    18
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Seattle
    Home Page:
    Livingston.
    Super stable, two guys casting - piece of cake - no wobble. Up on a plane lickity-split. High freeboard.
    Very popular with commercial fishermen on their big rigs.
     
  7. LCnSac

    LCnSac John or "LC"

    Joined:
    Aug 29, 2011
    Messages:
    1,173
    Likes Received:
    367
    Location:
    Sacramento, CA
    Home Page:
    Never have been in a Livingston, but as I see it, pros and cons:

    Pros: Cheap up to 14', light, very stable, work well with low HP motors
    Cons: Not comfortable with the raised middle interior, thus not a good FF boat, thin hull and generally cheap build, they have not upgraded the stern to handle a 4 stroke so the current HP ratings are very low. High profile boat that can pick up the wind. Not the best resale which is a plus if you're buying used.

    Not a bad choice for conventional trolling or moving around the Sound or local lakes. You can customize them pretty easily.
     
  8. Patrick Gould

    Patrick Gould Active Member

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2010
    Messages:
    2,355
    Likes Received:
    692
    Location:
    Ellensburg, WA
    Sounds like the Coho is a great boat. I'm glad to see that you're using the he'll out of it. September is the best month to play with power boats on the sound. Almost no wind and all the vacationing families are off the water. The north sound and San Junas can be deserted this time of year. I've crossed the straits several times in September when the water was like a pond.