Caddis question for Taxon

Discussion in 'Fly Fishing Entomology' started by Steve Kokita, Aug 10, 2017.

  1. Steve Kokita

    Steve Kokita FISHON206

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    Hi Roger,
    Most lakes I fish in Washington have a little black caddis. Some are seen fluttering up and down by the shore while other lakes have a good evening hatch across the lake. They seem to average around 1/2" and appear to be dark brown to black....
     
  2. Taxon

    Taxon Moderator Staff Member

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    Hi Steve-

    That would likely be a Black Dancer (Mystacides alafimbriatus).

    [​IMG]

    This is a photo of one taken by Brady Richards. Is that what they look like?
     
  3. Steve Kokita

    Steve Kokita FISHON206

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    Not sure if the antennas were that long....I'll have to catch one next time and look closer, thanks Roger.
     
  4. Taxon

    Taxon Moderator Staff Member

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    Good plan, Steve. Those fluttering up and down by the shore are likely Black Dancers. Those at other lakes having a good evening hatch across the lake are likely something else entirely. If possible, get photos. ;)
     
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  5. john gates

    john gates Vw Bus driving(68) God Fearing Adventure Seeker

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    Do fish feed on black dancers? I have seen them at spanaway lake. Like Steve said, along the shore line.. they must get ate, yes?
     
  6. Taxon

    Taxon Moderator Staff Member

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    Hi John-

    In a word, yes. :) Here is what Gary LaFontaine, highly respected author of Caddisflies had to say about genus Mystacides (Black Dancers) in his book:

    The common name, Black Dancer, comes from a description in entomologist Annie Hill Griffin's 1912 Survey of Oregon caddisflies, in which she notes how the mating swarms of adults rise and fall "with dizzying pertinacity."

    This genus is often abundant in lakes and slow-moving streams. Its value to flyfishermen is high because the adults are strictly a daytime insect, emergence and egg-laying flights occurring during the morning and evening ours. The pupae crawl out of the water, either on a shoreline rock or a protruding object, in the first hours after dawn. The females dive and lay their eggs underwater at dusk. The emergence and flight periods for all species are spread out over the warmer months of the summer.

    The larvae crawl freely over the bottom with little or no effort at concealment. They build relatively long, thin cases of plant, rock, or mollusk-shell fragments, a ten-millimeter insect carrying around a thirty-millimeter case. When they are ready to pupate, the larvae attach these cases to the surface of submerged objects.
     
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