Cast and Swing...no mending?

Discussion in 'Spey Clave' started by freestoneangler, Jan 10, 2010.

  1. SpeySpaz

    SpeySpaz still an authority on nothing

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    I do know what I'm doing, Pan, thanks for noticing. (wink)
    I am willing to mend if necessary, it does depend on the water. There's places where you need to mend, and places where you don't. And places where you could but don't have to.

    Scott O'Donnell told me most guys these days are "automenders", fixing bad casts with excessive line manipulation afterwards. I went on a trip with him a little over a year ago, and you probably know him, it's a mini skagit boot camp. He gave me a lot of shit about mending so much, and he turned out to be right. Changed my fishing for the better. Made me totally rethink the way I approach the water and the casts to cover it.

    Most guys are casting too close to 90 degrees across current, which forces you to mend, casting unnecessarily long, which forces you to mend, or casting from a lousy position in conflicting or unfavorable currents, which forces you to mend. Fishing strategically and working the near seam has almost eliminated excessive mending from my fishing, and increased my catch rate too. I'm placing the fly better than I did before. I like to fish in an upstream breeze. I'll take a lie from a carefully considered spot so the line can sweep sweetly through. There's lots of tricks. Would it make you feel better if I said it this way...I don't mend anywhere near as much as I used to. But I still need to now and then, I have to mend line on every outing, but certainly not on every or even most casts. Some water may demand that, it does depend on the water. I hardly have to mend on the Cowlitz, hardly ever. Not that there's anything wrong with that.
    Here's one from NewYear's day. A nice curve cast placed the fly at 60 degrees to current, swung the seam without a touch of mending, and got hammered on the way out of the seam.
    View attachment 28117
    regards, Bob
     
  2. Panhandle

    Panhandle Active Member

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    Much better :)
     
  3. SpeySpaz

    SpeySpaz still an authority on nothing

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    hey, I'm here to please, man.

    sometimes the short version invites misinterpretation.
    I should have explained better.
     
  4. Richard Torres

    Richard Torres Active Member

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    Steve has hit it spot on.
    There is nothing more frustrating than having your fly taken out of a dead drift because your line is arcing downstream due to a faster current seam.
     
  5. SpeySpaz

    SpeySpaz still an authority on nothing

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    I think you're headed the right way, Wayne. This is next level stuff.
    How much mending would you need if you turned your body more downstream, cast out at 60 degrees intead of 90 degrees to the current, and threw your mend while the line was in midair or just as the tip touches down, then follow the belly down and begin to lead the line with your rod tip in the last half of the swing? I bet if you tried that at a spot like the one you were at, the lights would come on! Plus,if you keep your tip up, holding more line off the water, there's less line to belly on you. Many of the Jedi hold their rods high, instead of holding a drop loop with a low tip. This way they still have slack, but gain the added benefit of having less running line on the water. This doesn't mean you won't have to mend on occasion, but you'll be surprised at how much mending you can eliminate and still achieve a nice, slow, controlled swing.
    I picked that tip up from Scott O'Donnell too, and from watching Mike Kinney.
     
  6. Ed Call

    Ed Call Mumbling Moderator Staff Member

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    Spaz, is that a Meiser on your Meiser lined with a Meizer? Just asking. Oh, nice fish too!
     
  7. Red Shed

    Red Shed "junkyard spey"

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    I think Bob's nailed it.


    Mending is for socks!
     
  8. SpeySpaz

    SpeySpaz still an authority on nothing

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    yes Ed, that's a 14' 6/7/8 "S" rod, with an 8/10 Meiser reel, spooled up with ELF over 30# dacron, and happily pitching an SGS head.

    a pure thoroughbred!

    That's my primo scandi outfit right now.
     
  9. KerryS

    KerryS Ignored Member

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    To much thinking going on here. Huck it out there, throw a mend in it you think one is needed, ease back and check out the scenery. I hardly ever look at my line after the swing starts. I usually can tell by the feel on the rod if I am getting a good swing. After the first mend, if needed, lefting some of the running line out of the water or vice versa is enough to control your swing.
     
  10. Panhandle

    Panhandle Active Member

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    Huck it out there? Check out the scenery? don't think so much?

    This is very bad advice. Steelheading is very complicated. One can't huck it out there. You have to focus! One must look hard at the water. Mountains, trees, flora, wildlife? All critical distractions from the task at hand. You must swing with intention and let nothing interfere, nothing! Its steelheading god damn it!!!!
     
  11. flatheadmatt

    flatheadmatt Member

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    being new to swinging flies for fish im curious as to what constitutes the need for a mend? What type of swinging speed are we trying to achieve here? Do you really want that fly to creep through the swing...? I have had some moments where it just felt " right"....but im still full of questions as I am seriously lacking in the fish hooked department
     
  12. Richard Torres

    Richard Torres Active Member

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    .....Screams the sensei as he slaps grasshopper upside the head.
     
  13. Richard Torres

    Richard Torres Active Member

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    Think like steelhead grasshopper.
    A steelhead who is hiding behind big rock to avoid many thousands of cubic feet of water from tossing him back into ocean.

    He is very hungry, and doesn't want to expend energy, so he looks for simple meal that floats by slower...:ray1:
     
  14. Cougar97

    Cougar97 Member

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    Flatheadmatt,

    Some may disagree with this statement, I fish mainly for summer run fish with floating line, what I try to accomplish is a swing that produces a very light line tension. Like many I after my initial cast I strip in or let out about a 18" loop which hold between my index finger and the cork on my rod as lightly as possible. If I find that during the swing the loop want to pull out, most likely I have too much resistance on my line, hence too much downstream bow in my line which is pulling the line faster than the fly creating two things.
    1. The fly is most chasing then line down stream with the head of the fly pointed down stream and not giving the fish much of a view of the entire fly.
    2. If there is too much tension on the line the hackle of the fly will compress as it swings through the zone, I feel what we are trying to accomplish is a presentation where the fly pulsates as it swings in front of target creating the illusion of something alive. Not scientific but these tips have served me well.

    Tight Lines,
     
  15. Phil Fravel

    Phil Fravel Friendly

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    Question? Don't you mend to control fly speed and depth? Depending on your skill of reading the water and placement of fly, In some places you might need to mend more and in some palaces less ?