Casting Basket Tangle

#16
If the fish doesn't earn the reel don't worry about it. The only time I might force the issue is if there's only a little line in the basket (shortly after a cast), and I might slap the reel a couple times for the reel. When I first started salmon fishing I lost a lot of fish trying to force them on the reel...just pay attention to catching the fish, and not spooling up line for no reason.

There's really no way around your issue if you want to spool up the line though. The line you are trying to spool is under layers of line you stripped on top, and forcing it out will often lead to tangles.
 
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#17
I agree with Scott here. It took me a very long time to learn that I didn't have to get a fish on the reel. I lost way too many thinking it necessary. When a fish runs I'll let him put himself on the reel. If he comes at me I can strip much faster than I can reel up the slack being created.

I sold my stripping basket and now use a stripping tray called Flexi-Stripper. It's out of Denmark. I like it a lot better.

Flexi-Stripper looks cool, especially for the boat. I built a platform on the back of my little Whaler that’s a combination battery/fuel tank cover and I also use to cast off of if I’m solo. A basket isn’t in the cards on the deck or elsewhere if it’s just me as space is tight. Looks like it’s worth checking out. Maybe I can convince my wife I need it like she needs a new piece of Danish furniture!


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gt

Active Member
#18
Not necessary in most cases for trout. If you try to get most trout you catch on the reel, your probably causing unneeded stress on the fish.
stress?? not really, if you practice doing this, it is quick and easy. those of you who never fish for aggressive saltwater fishes probably don't care about this technique, but if you are planning on some adventure, you should be practicing at every opportunity. oh, and the other thing, you should be reeling with your dominant hand!
 

Buzzy

Active Member
#19
oh, and the other thing, you should be reeling with your dominant hand!
I remember reading a book in which the author suggested if you didn't reel with your dominant hand you were doing it wrong. At the time, I was reeling with my dominant hand but that mean switching the rod to my less dominant hand to hold the rod while fighting fish. I live in Central WA (used to live in Sequim) so we don't have aggressive saltwater fish but we do have some tough fish that pull hard and can be quite heavy. I'm not strong enough to hold my rod in my non-dominant hand when the catching is really good. And I think there's a chance to make a mistake when transferring the rod from one hand to the next. I respooled all my reels so I cast with dominant hand (right hand) and reel left handed.


But I hear you.
 

jasmillo

Active Member
#20
stress?? not really, if you practice doing this, it is quick and easy. those of you who never fish for aggressive saltwater fishes probably don't care about this technique, but if you are planning on some adventure, you should be practicing at every opportunity. oh, and the other thing, you should be reeling with your dominant hand!
For most anglers, I think making an attempt to get an SRC on the reel will cause unneeded stress to the fish. In most cases they can get the fish to the net and released more quickly without getting the fish on the reel.

I am not arguing it’s not an important skill to practice for some species. It absolutely is. I just don’t think it’s necessary for SRC and I don’t think that is the species you should practice on.

As far as the dominant hand thing, I have heard that before and have always been curious. I do not do that and it feels very odd to reel with my right hand or fight a fish with my left arm. Curious what the reasoning is for this as I am definitely willing to give it a shot if I am putting myself at a disadvantage.
 

mtskibum16

Active Member
#21
As far as the dominant hand thing, I have heard that before and have always been curious. I do not do that and it feels very odd to reel with my right hand or fight a fish with my left arm. Curious what the reasoning is for this as I am definitely willing to give it a shot if I am putting myself at a disadvantage.
Because that's how he does it, and he's a pro.
 

mbowers

Active Member
#25
For most anglers, I think making an attempt to get an SRC on the reel will cause unneeded stress to the fish. In most cases they can get the fish to the net and released more quickly without getting the fish on the reel.

I am not arguing it’s not an important skill to practice for some species. It absolutely is. I just don’t think it’s necessary for SRC and I don’t think that is the species you should practice on.

As far as the dominant hand thing, I have heard that before and have always been curious. I do not do that and it feels very odd to reel with my right hand or fight a fish with my left arm. Curious what the reasoning is for this as I am definitely willing to give it a shot if I am putting myself at a disadvantage.
The reasoning is that your motor skills are better developed in your dominant hand so you can reel faster with it. Lefty Kreh says the same thing. I went to dominant hand reeling to give my dominant elbow a break from heavy lifting: it seems to have helped a lot with tendonitis.

I cast and strip with rod in dominant hand but if the fish does take enough line to earn the reel only then do I switch rod hands from dominant to non-dominant: best time to switch hands is when fish is taking line. I think I get fewer tangles on the reel handle too while clearing the line because the handle is on the outside while stripping.

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Buzzy

Active Member
#26
I think I get fewer tangles on the reel handle too while clearing the line because the handle is on the outside while stripping.

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Don't think we have to worry about this with SRC very often but an interesting observation. I had a heck of a time my first couple days on Christmas Island with line getting caught on the handle when those rockets struck and took off. I did learn a technique to quickly turn the reel away when a bonefish hit but took some learning curve (learning curve expedited with far too many broken tippets.)
 
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