Catch and Release???

Discussion in 'Fly Fishing Forum' started by troutpounder, May 5, 2012.

  1. troutpounder

    troutpounder Active Member

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    So I know as a die hard fly fisherman my stance on catch and release is supposed to be "only catch and release and not take home any fish at all!" But I ask you is taking home a few fish that are of good size and limiting on salmon a bad thing? I dont think it is that harmful to the fishery, or the state would not allow and keepers right? I just here alot from other fly guys that you should not take any fish home. I disagree but am wondering what you guys think?
     
  2. Irafly

    Irafly Indi "Ira" Jones

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    Dude, I'm not sure which fly fisherman you hear from but keeping hatchery brats is a norm. Stocked trout, keep away unless maybe on selective water fisheries. I think we as a group are all over the board on this.
     
  3. Stew McLeod

    Stew McLeod aka BigMac

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    As a rule I don't keep any native fish, in fact the only fish I have knowingly killed in the past 15 years have been hatchery salmon.
     
  4. Jonathan Tachell

    Jonathan Tachell Active Member

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    I only keep hatchery fish as a rule but will sometimes keep wild fish that are over populated and I feel the run or other species that return to that same system could benefit from the harvest of said wild fish. For example, Puyallup river pink salmon.
     
  5. Salmo_g

    Salmo_g Well-Known Member

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    Catch and release wild trout and steelhead and salmon that are from under-escaped populations. Harvest hatchery origin fish whenever the regulations allow it.

    Sg
     
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  6. Evan Salmon

    Evan Salmon Active Member

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    I agree with Irafly, I don't know many (any really) fly fishermen who are totally against keeping any fish of any kind. Everyone has their personal tastes and biasis. I would never intentionally kill a wild salmonid and I don't keep hatchery versions because I don't like to eat them. Bass, on the other hand....
     
  7. Daryle Holmstrom

    Daryle Holmstrom retiredfishak

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    Can't beat a good crappie fry, yum
     
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  8. Patrick Gould

    Patrick Gould Active Member

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    Panfish grow so fast and can be so prolific that it helps the fishery to keep them.
     
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  9. Rob Allen

    Rob Allen Active Member

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    the only wild fish that I kill intentionally are brook trout 1 because they are non-native and 2 they are very good eating mostly i do this in Montana because that's pretty much the only time I trout fish. hatchery salmon steelhead and trout kill and eat...
     
  10. freestoneangler

    freestoneangler Not to be confused with Freestone

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    The last fish I kept was in June 1997. The date is solid in my mind as it was only a few months after my dad passed away and I went to the Kamloop's lakes region to clear my head. I kept a hefty rainbow at Tunkwa Lake that had taken a damsel pattern deep and was not going to swim away despite my best efforts. Absolutely great looking fillets...tasted like mud.

    I subscribe to catch & release even for hatchery fish because; first, I don't want to be bothered preparing them for the BBQ or smoker and second, a re-cycled fish offers another opportunity to catch that fish.
     
  11. Old Man

    Old Man Just an Old Man (NFR)

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    I don't remember the last fish I kept. I know it's been a long time ago. I've been retired for over 13 years and I know that I haven't kept any fish in the time frame. And I notice that in that time frame I haven't seen any of the fish I did catch go belly up..

    If you handle them only a little and be nice to them they will live to be caught another day.

    But now my Granddaughter has discovered her taste for trout and asked if I could bring a few home. Maybe.
     
  12. Chris Johnson

    Chris Johnson Member: Native Fish Society

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    I kept 4 stocked trout from a local lake just the other day and cooked em for dinner, my wife loves em. That is what they are there for, I kill every hatchery fish I encounter. When I go up to the interior lakes in b.c. I always keep a couple to eat(if it's legal to do so), nothin wrong with that.
     
  13. freestoneangler

    freestoneangler Not to be confused with Freestone

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    "...I kill every hatchery fish I encounter..." -- why?
     
  14. Smalma

    Smalma Active Member

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    I keep and eat a lot of fish - my wife and I eat fish (include shellfsih) of some kind at least 3 times of week. In addition many of my fishing/hunting lunches feature either smoked kokanee or Columbia spring Chinook.

    I frequently keep such critters as crabs, spot prawns, geoducks, ling cod, halibut, etc. I suspect except for some ling cod there is virtually no interest in releasing any of those other critters by most "anglers" in the state. From time to time I do enjoy a nice mess of fried panfish (perch or crappie).

    When it comes to salmonids I do keep some fish from healthy populations and in a typically year I may keep any of the following kokanee, pink, sockeye, coho or Chinook. I never keep a bull trout, sea-run cutthroat or stream resident trout and have not keep a hatchery steelhead in more than 15 years.

    In fact tonight the menu includes prawns (grilled on the barbie on skrewer with garlic butter), ling cod (fried in olive oil after dredging in flour, egg wash and panko), "dirty rice", steamed asparagus (with a little sea-salt), fresh baked bread and a rhubarb pie. Might even pull cork on a nice Ressling to go with.

    BTW I harvested the prawns and ling cod yesterday, the rhubard and asparagus are from the garden.

    In short fishing opportunities in this state are very diverse and certianly provide the opportunity for some excellent "eats" for those that are so inlcined. The key is to recognize that some species serve our interests best in CnR fisheries others for the table. I feel strongly that an anlger has ample room to harvest and enjoy the bounty of waters; the key is to be selective in what and where we take that harvest.

    Tight lines
    Curt
     
  15. mtskibum16

    mtskibum16 Active Member

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    Well said Curt. Also, dinner sounds amazing!