Cedar Interest, so here's a repost: Cedar CDC Stone

Jim Speaker

Active Member
#1
I posted this about 4 years ago when I still lived down there and fished the Cedar all the time. This fly evolved over a couple seasons. It sinks like a rock, which is a damn good thing in the Cedar where you want to get deep fast to be able to drop into steep holes and so forth. One of the key things about it is emphasis on only the reddish fibers from a pheasant tail - much aquarium net bug catching on the cedar led me to believe that the rusty color was a good thing. Anyways, this fly works like a charm deep nymphing the Cedar and is one of the first flies I tie on in any decent size river e.g. Yak, Big Hole, Rock Creek, etc.

The original photos were lost, so I tied this one tonight and put the images back into their original location on one of my servers so the original post is also repaired now. Uh yeah anyway:

Cedar CDC Stone
Tiemco 3761BL #10
Tail: Pheasant Tail (reddish fibers only)
Rib: Medium (Amber) Copper Wire wound fairly tight, just enough space to barely expose underbody
-- tie in the tab-end of wire on the side of the hook up to the thorax to get the foundation for some threadwraps to form a widened, fairly uniform stonefly body
Body: Pheasant Tail (reddish fibers only)
Wingcase: Wide Black Holographic Tinsel
Thorax: Peacock Ice Dub
Legs: Dark(est) Gray CDC Puffs
Head: (Amber) Copper Bead









Cheers
 
#3
Used this fly on Saturday fishing the Duckabush. I could not keep fish off of it. Best fish of the day was probably about 12 inches, maybe a bit more. Put up a nice little fight, either way. Caught several more in the 8-10 inch range.

Anyway, just wanted to give it props. A great fly and lots of fun to fish. Fished it deep under an indicator through various runs and pocket water and it just slayed 'em.

so much fun.

jason
 

Old Man

Just an Old Man
#5
I tried to put a little bug in Jerry's ear about having something like this on this web site. Showing how to ties flies up. Step by step. But I never heard back from him.

This is a great tool on flies out of the ordinary.
 
#9
Nice looking fly. The tiemco 3761BL is only a 1X long. Are you sure you are representing a stone fly? I am by no means arguing with your success and the fly's ability to sink deep into desirable pools. Just wondering if it represents something other than a stone fly?????
 
#10
There has been some suggestion that these may be representing green drake nymph but it could also just be brown and buggy and heavy with some swim to it. A hares ear doesn't really represent anything in particular and it catches a ton of fish, and so does this tie!

Sent from my HTC_Amaze_4G
 
#11
Nice looking fly. The tiemco 3761BL is only a 1X long. Are you sure you are representing a stone fly? I am by no means arguing with your success and the fly's ability to sink deep into desirable pools. Just wondering if it represents something other than a stone fly?????
Gary is right on the money.

That was just the name I gave it way back when.

More recently I posted a photo in Entomology that Taxon identified as Drunella Grandis, Western Green Drake. This fly is a match for the rust coloration and the size.

But, I named it that years ago, so I'm stickin with it. :)