CHIRONOMID THREAD -

Discussion in 'Stillwater' started by Drifter, Jan 11, 2012.

  1. chewydog

    chewydog Active Member

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    Those plate shots are better than sample platters from Denny's. especially like the leeches.
     
  2. pond monkey

    pond monkey Guest

    Some good hatches I see.... some nice zooplankton (always a good indicator of a healthy food chain)...
    I did not see any chromies or chromers in the sample..... they are little beauties...Thanks for posting....I am not good at post photos except on facebook but there are some great photos of emerging pupae at a link...
    geocities.jp/sulmenuka/kapyupa.htm if any one cares...
    Thanks for posting.....

    Paul
     
  3. pond monkey

    pond monkey Guest

  4. Blue

    Blue Active Member

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    Thanks, I was trying to look every way I could. Very COOL!!!!
     
  5. Nick Clayton

    Nick Clayton Active Member

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    Couple questions that popped into my head while on the water today. I see all sorts of talk about big hatches during the winter? I have caught fish on mids this winter but haven't seen many signs of a hatch. So do the fish just know what it is even when there is no hatch?

    What is a bloodworm?
     
  6. Blue

    Blue Active Member

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  7. fisherjon

    fisherjon Member

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    larval stage of a midge
     
  8. Jeff Dodd

    Jeff Dodd Active Member

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    http://www.askaboutflyfishing.com/speakers/brian-chan/brian-chan.cfm
    Nick,
    Lots of good information in the above mp3 radio shows. Brian Chan was a guest on Fly Fish Radio & the link is to his first 2 shows a couple years ago. He had a follow-up show in 2011 that is also available for free download in the show archives.

    You'll find lots cool broadcasts in the archives if you've not already discouvered them.

    Thanks to all for this nice thread on Chironomid fishing.
     
  9. troutpocket

    troutpocket Active Member

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    Some experimenting at the vice tonight. Black with red rib and clear scud back, chromie with clear scud back, olive thread/black rib with olive scud back, and pheasant tail.
     
  10. pond monkey

    pond monkey Guest

    I find the term "bloodworm" to be a little confusing because it is not a technical term...
    Generally though I think that when most anglers mention bloodworms they're thinking big (one inch or more)... and often they are referring to a genus that maybe doesn't hatch with a main spring broods.... maybe not 'til august or later so they are still around in summer months .....My theory is that most anglers are referring to the larvae of the genus chironomus.....
    Also some anglers might occasionally see "aquatic worms" which can be red .... either in throat samples or on weeds or marl pulled up with an anchor and think that they are seeing chironomidae or leeches....(most aquatic worms that I se are iron grey.)

    It is a jungle out there...

    Paul

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blood_worm
    http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=chironomus&qpvt=chironomus&FORM=IGRE#x0y0
     
  11. Blue

    Blue Active Member

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    All I know is that is when I see those in a stomach sample I tie on a SJW. I also tie one using a 200R hook in #16 and use red thread and Micro tube and tie off with a black thread head. Very popular choice when you see those in the samples.
     
  12. pond monkey

    pond monkey Guest

    A good read for the stillwater angler is "Kamloops" by Steve Raymond (Seattle guy)... it was written in the late 80s I think....I have read and reread it over the years.... the development and history of Kamloops region of BC by the Europeans is the history of stillwater angling especially fly angling...
    To read about the development of stocking programs... (most the lakes were the barren) and Bill Nation( famous guide)....He probably tied and fished the first chironomid pattern (Nation's black)....is all so very interesting....
    ******This is an important book for the stillwater angler..... even if you never ever plan to fish B.C. ......
    Paul
     
  13. Stonefish

    Stonefish Triploid, Humpy & Seaplane Hater

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    Nick,
    Thats a good question. I know of one situation that occurs where I've seen really heavy hatches in the winter time. That is when a lake opens up after being completely frozen over for a few days.
    Except for maybe the Bellingham area, we seldom get those types of extended super cold weather fronts in western Washington.
    It is almost like the chironomids know the ice is there and they have pent energy to hatch. Once the ice opens up, they hatch heavily. When it does happen it is pretty cool to see.
    I learned about this years ago from employees at the Morning Hatch in Tacoma.
     
  14. Nick Clayton

    Nick Clayton Active Member

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    I didn't word my original question as well as I wanted. Stupid smart phone.

    Let's take Pass lake for example, since I've spent quite a bit of time there lately trying to learn it some...... Let's I show up to Pass on a January morning and get out on the water. Now I know people fish chironomids quite successfuly on Pass, and with this knowledge in my head I know that at some point I will probably anchor up and drop chironomids. I have done that, and I have done well at certain times. At other times I try and it's just dead... As I did this past Sunday.

    Now, the only reason I fished chironomids at all in this lake is that I've been told how productive they can be- Not because I got to the water and noticed a hatch coming off. In fact, over the past month I haven't really seen much of any sign of chironomids hatching. Seen a few schucks in the water here and there, but that's it. So sometimes, with zero signs of a hatch, I have good luck with chironomids. Other times, as this past Sunday for example, I couldn't buy a fish with mids, and instead could only get them on leeches.

    So, I guess what I'm wondering is.... If I show up to a lake and see no signs of chironomids, is it worth fishing them anyway? Do fish recognize a tasty chironomid well enough on lakes with heavy populations of them that even if there are none present the fish might just remember what it is and eat? Or what do you think explains the fact that sometimes it's been hot using mids, and other times its been dead, when none of the time there appears to be a hatch.... that I can see.
     
  15. troutpocket

    troutpocket Active Member

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    From what I've read (Fly Patterns for Stillwaters by Phil Rowley has some good info on this topic) chironomids are available to trout every day of the year. Whether or not they are actively hatching. But the trick is finding where the bugs are active and there is a gathering of actively feeding trout. What this means is that location is critical for chironomid fishing, especially in the winter! In the winter months I usually start out on the move, casting and stripping leeches to gauge the activity level of the fish. If it's not producing like I think it should, I'll start looking for likely areas to soak a chironomid or leech under an indicator. If I don't get a takedown in 10 minutes (or less) it's on to the next spot. On most days, one of these tactics (casting/stripping or bobber watching) will produce and often I switch back and forth throughout the day.