chiros vs. leaches... i need an opinion

Discussion in 'Stillwater' started by Dead Drift, Aug 12, 2010.

  1. kvannice

    kvannice Member

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    You have to change it up troll,cast & strip at logs, down trees,rocks,grass lines, rises.Strike indicators are not just for chiros they have a lot of other uses.Wind drift, sink and retrieve. i use my fish finder just for depth , top water temp and the thermocline.
     
  2. Caveman

    Caveman Member

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    I have learned to use both, it all depends on what the fish are keying in on. Try a leach under an indicator and fish it like a Chironomid. Works great at times.

    Adam
     
  3. Robert Engleheart

    Robert Engleheart Robert

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    What sizes would be considered a "mini" or "Micro" leech? Other than size, is there anything particular about them?
     
  4. robl

    robl Member

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    I love stickin' fish and the fight. I catch many more fish on Chironomids in the spring than leeches, but in the fall the leeches will most often outfish the Chiros. I have discovered the magic of scuds this year and find myself fishing scuds whenever I can find an excuse. I make my own stillwater indicators that are light and awesome. I love watchin' that indicator go under! There is a lot ot be said for the savage take of a big trout on a tight line though! I just love to fish! Callibaetis can prove some rediculous fishing on a lot of lakes as well. Learn to do it all!
     
  5. JMitchell

    JMitchell Active Member

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    Carry two rods and do both. One rigged with your floater/indicator and the other with your intermmediate/full sinker. I do both and they each have their moments when you can't buy a fish on one and knock them dead with the other.

    Jarron
     
  6. pfournier

    pfournier Do it outside!

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    I'll braindumb on the chironomid game for a six pack! :)
     
  7. markdmen

    markdmen New Member

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    There are several problems trolling anything around: most notably, you row right over the top of any fish you hope will see your fly and most self-respecting fish will scatter when something casts a shadow above them, 2 there's not a bug in the world that travels in a straight line at specific depth and speed up and down a lake, 3 you typically don't have a rod in your hand when trolling and, 4 OK now you've hooked a fish what do you do? Drop an anchor? Drift into the shoreline or another boater while you try to play and net a fish? The beauty of fly fishing is that there is not one fly or technique that works 100% of the time. It takes experience, skill, knowledge and sometimes just plain old luck to achieve any kind of success at it. And just when you think you have it figured out, something changes and you feel like a rookie all over again. Observation, sharing information, reading, perseverance and continually working at it improve your chances but sometimes coaxing cooperation from the fish just does not come easy.
     
  8. tkseadawg

    tkseadawg New Member

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    Just got back from another lake fishing trip to BC where the locals all fish exclusively using chronomids. Depth is the absolute key, even a fish finder is not 100 % accurate. Take forceps, secure them to your fly and drop the leader in the water until you find the bottom raise it 6"-12" and secure your strike indicator. Now that you have figured the depth, the next challenge is what fly. You can tell if the chronomids are active by the presence or lack of shuck casings on the surface. You can definitely determine the size by what you see. Color is determined by pumping the trout's stomach. Morris and Chan's book is outstanding!! Another tip would be to use a 9' tapered leader, add a small swivel, and then add the amount of tippet needed to get you to the bottom. Good luck.
     
  9. markdmen

    markdmen New Member

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    Leader construction is a topic rarely discussed and I believe often misunderstood, especially by newcomers to stillwater angling - the comment above about a 9' leader terminated by a swivel to which is attached as much tippet as needed to approach bottom is an example. The last thing you want is several feet of tippet, especially of one diameter, below a swivel or splitshot to get your fly near the bottom. The deeper you fish, the more critical it is to build a properly tapered leader. Add a fly or two, a splitshot, a swivel, add a little breeze, then a strike indicator and a poorly constructed leader will lead to a very frustrating day on the lake. I actually heard one angler talk about how he tapered his leader from 5X to 0X because he thought 5X was thicker than 0X! Splitshot and swivels under indicators should be positioned no further than two or three feet from the fly. This means when fishing long leaders with floating lines (I'm talking 15' to 25' or longer), store-bought tapered leaders, typically 9' long, are only the beginning. I recommend buying tapered leaders ending in 0X or 1X, then creating the proper length by attaching tippet sections 1X, 2X, 3X, 4X, 5X etc. until the desired length is achieved. Simply attaching a long length of 4X, for example, to a 9' tapered leader ending in 3X will not turn your fly, swivel etc. over and it will all pile up at the end of your floating line, often in a tangle. You won't be fishing. I'm sure the pros, Chan and Rowley, discuss it with much more precision and technical expertise than this brief opinion, but I'm convinced proper leader construction is often overlooked. Even with deep lines, proper leaders are important. A dragon fly nymph or leech needs to be fished near the bottom: NEAR the bottom, not in it. Simply attaching a 9' tapered leader to a wet line and calling it "good" won't work as well as cutting the middle portion out, discarding the butt and discarding the often rotten tip section to achieve 3' or 4' max tapered leader. This allows the fly line to sink below the fly and the fly to swim just above the weed line where fish can see it. Another reason not to get too carried away with weighting wet flies. Let the line do the work of putting the fly in the correct position.
     
  10. Michael Nelson

    Michael Nelson Old And In The Way

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    Re: fishfinders. The depth shown on the finder is the depth from the point of the transducer on down. If your transducer is a foot under the water and the fishfinder shows the depth as 5 feet, it is really probably 6 feet deep from the surface of the water to the bottom. I think with the Humminbird Fishin' Buddy 140c I use on my Scadden pontoon boat, the transducer is more like 2 feet under the surface.

    I use the forceps method to set my indicator depth for just this reason.
     
  11. Michael Nelson

    Michael Nelson Old And In The Way

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    Hmmm. I use straight six pound test fluorocarbon when I have to go 20-30 feet deep, with a small split shot about 3 feet above my fly. I set the indicator depth with the forceps method.

    No, I can't cast it. I feed it out hand over hand, and then I back away from the indicator.
     
  12. Mark Walker

    Mark Walker Active Member

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    I do somewhat the same as this, although I'm very rarely deeper than twenty feet...mostly 12-18. Use 4 pound fluorocarbon, the forceps method (although my butter fingers really piss me off when I drop them in the lake doing this), a two fly midge (18-22) with the weighted one about a foot from the bottom, and these for indicators.......

    http://cgi.ebay.com/Strike-Indicator-Improved-2010-4pack-3-4-dia-/120611406039?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0

    Easy to put these on your line and adjust without damage and a lot of hassle. They simply "screw" down on the line and the "O'ring holds it in place. I toss the whole thing 15/20 feet from me without incident (usually) and kick away if I need to be further from the indicator.
     
  13. Lakebuzzer

    Lakebuzzer I like to rip lips,,

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    If you are fishing that deep why don't you just use straight 6 lb fluorocarbon with a type V or VI line. A lot easier then fighting a 20-30ft leader..
     
  14. Irafly

    Irafly Indi "Ira" Jones

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    When fishing that deep, I don't use a full sink, because I like to watch the indicator go under pure and simple as that. I also don't taper quite the way mention above but out of a boat I don't struggle to much to cast 20' of leader unless it is dead calm.

    I love chironomid discussions.

    Ira..
     
  15. Alexander

    Alexander Fishon

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    We fished a chironomid hatch once on the Delaney Butte lakes up in CO, and it was straight crazy, we could not keep the fish off our hooks! The things were hatching and buzzing everywhere, loud buzzing, it was annoying, bugs everywhere! Same method as above, long leaders 1 or two feet off the bottom and slowly bring in line and then SLAM fishon... those were some great memories!