Clack Vs Hyde

Discussion in 'Watercraft' started by Steelie Mike, Feb 17, 2005.

  1. Flyfishsteel

    Flyfishsteel New Member

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    ... go with what your heart tells you, and you will NEVER look back, and not say something like: "Man, I should've gotten a Clackacraft" .

    Good luck my friend!
     
  2. Jerry Daschofsky

    Jerry Daschofsky Moderator Staff Member

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    I agree with flyfishsteel on this one. In the end, go with what your heart tells you. Chances are if you do opt to get a Hyde, something in the back of your head may keep telling you "I wish I had the.....". Also, like nympher mentioned, it's a ford/chevy debate. It's funny to hear anyone talk about sleds or driftboats on a gear board (let alone hooks, OMG it's terrible). Just like rods, some boats are more made for some people then others. Yes, I have seen clacks with punctured hulls. A person who lives down at the end of 54th Ave in Fife used to be a guide (was a guide when damage happened) and saw a boat he had just punctured. So it can be done. Hell, any boat can have it's problem. Have even seen aluminum boats who have snapped a weld on a hit. Just depends on defects, which can happen to ANYTHING man made out there.
     
  3. ssickle1

    ssickle1 Slow and Low

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    Sounds like your set on a glass boat. If you break a Clack (you won't) they guarantee it. I bought a 16 foot Clack a couple years ago and thought I would never buy another boat. Turns out the low sides and lack of rake made overnighters and BIG water just a little more precarious than I liked. I filled it with water 2 seperate times and it scared the heck out of me. That being said it was a great boat to fish from.

    It's not Ford V Chevy, it's finding a boat that meets your long term needs. If you are a day float guy it's not going to matter one way or the other...they are all nice.

    My $.02
     
  4. Jerry Daschofsky

    Jerry Daschofsky Moderator Staff Member

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    I'd have to say ssickle it is a ford vs. chevy thing. You could put 10 different experienced rowers along 10 different say 16x48 driftboats, and chances are most will opt out on a different boat. Since most make "similar" sizes. Just each has their own "niche". Some people more buy off a name. Yet some just love the feel of certain boats. Plus, those who use a boat for multiple fishing activities, may want a totally different boat then those who say simply flyfish. You can find a boat that meets your needs in just about every manufacturer that is still producing and those that are long since gone. But it's what the person takes preference in at the end is what sells the boat. Which, I know guys who swear by alumaweld DB's, yet know others who won't row anything but a Willies. Most make good driftboats nowadays, it comes down to what you have confidence in, and how you plan to use the boat.
     
  5. Davy

    Davy Active Member

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    No matter what boat you buy- if you plan to use it in "any real water" get used to what it will and won't do.

    i.e. = most 52" bottom boats are much slower to respond than than the average 48" boat which means an extra oar stroke or two to get the boat where you want it , learn this.And all 52" are not the same either.I have had many many boats over the last 28 years or so( 7wood, 5 glass and 1 metal that I remember) and "all" were different in their rowing capabilities.

    My current little 48" is very very quick but a 52" Clack is very slow compared to that(I rowed one Tuesday but not the first )for spinning around rocks and such.

    The 52" will handle xtra weight and are more stable however= I agree

    Just learn what your new boat will but more importantly won't do.

    Clack has a good name recently but not always- perhaps some due to the guide discounts, but still lately a good name.

    Davy
     
  6. ssickle1

    ssickle1 Slow and Low

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    Sorry, I work for Ford Motor.

    And I dissagree...sort of. You are right about each boat having its' niche. My point was just that. If you buy a clack or a hyde you will be unhappy when you want to do a four day trip with you wife on the Deschutes or the Rogue. You will be happy if you want to float the rivers in SW Washington, or the Yak, Lower Sky, Ect.

    You mentioned before that you used to guide whitewater. You know that the MacKenzie drifter was built for whitewater rivers, clacks and hydes are not. That's all I was saying. I know some will flame me for saying so but less rake and low sides is great for casting out of, get in and out of, ect, and a misshap waiting to happen in big water.
     
  7. Jerry Daschofsky

    Jerry Daschofsky Moderator Staff Member

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    Yup, I know the Mackenzie style boats were made for whitewatering, I've actually run them in whitewater in fact. Actually, only thing that really seperates a whitewater driftboat from a non whitewater driftboat is the high sides usually (which all the original Mackenzies were wood anyways). I would never row a low side through whitewater. Can be done, but too easy to catch a wave over the side. But it's not a brand that makes it a whitewater boat, it's the simple design that does. Plus, nowadays, I do believe only Lavro touts whitewater ability with their drifters (hyde and clack may, but haven't seen any recent vids by them). Not sure about the others anymore. But all are pretty much based off the same designs. Just some now have different added features to change rowing styles with the boats.
     
  8. ssickle1

    ssickle1 Slow and Low

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    Jerry,

    Before I sold my clack, I called them and asked if they plan on making a boat with a rake and higher side? They asked my why, I told them. They think their boat is ok for whitewater. Trust me it's marginal. And your right it is the design. It goes back to the niche thing you were referring to before. Clacks are good at what their for and that is fishing out of. Sitting in the water most glass boats will have flared low sides and a low bow. Their will also be a lack of rake. Willies, Alumawelds, Kofflers, ect will sit high front and and rear out of the water. That is not a chevy or for thing that is a chevy or toyota thing.
     
  9. Jerry Daschofsky

    Jerry Daschofsky Moderator Staff Member

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    Ah, see, most of the glass boats I've used (except some newer Hydes and clack's a few years ago) were older glass boats. Only difference between them an the aluminum where materials they were made with. Say my old eastside, looks like a top notch whitewater boat. In fact, plan to run it down some harder water once I have all the strength back in my arms/shoulders. But most of my experience where with the older boats made here in the NW. All those are pretty much just the same as the aluminum boats out there. But you're right, the clacks/hydes were more built with flyfisherman in mind. So have the lower sides. Some have the REAL low sides.
     
  10. Davy

    Davy Active Member

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    There is one boat that is still available but not real well known anymore= Slide-Rite

    Don Hill has the SR molds but they will cost you and he hardly markets them.

    They were "the " boat for a time but there are many rumors and stories about why they are no more and I cannot state them publicly here.

    They will handle whitewater for sure with the best of them.

    They are also a great boat to "fish" from and I would think similar to a new Clack

    You might ask Don about one.


    davy
     
  11. Jerry Daschofsky

    Jerry Daschofsky Moderator Staff Member

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    Well, my Eastside will be my last glass boat. I will finish restoring it, and will keep it. Don't plan to ever sell it (I'm a boat whore anyways). But plan on getting a willie drifter probably. Rowed my friends, and simply fell in love with it. So may look at buying one. But have so many toys to rebuy. So will stick with the DB I have now.
     
  12. Davy

    Davy Active Member

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    I agree, luved my 16' eastside, had that wood boat "feel" without the maintenence so much.but fell in luv with this little Birchcraft for my wife and I- So i bought it, don't really row much WW anymore anway
     
  13. Jerry Daschofsky

    Jerry Daschofsky Moderator Staff Member

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    Yeah, I may not be doing much whitewatering either. Depends on how this shoulder goes. Will slowly test the waters (no pun intended) and work my way up. But may not be able to hit the big water anymore. Not a good thing to throw the shoulder out in a solid class V.

    I still get jazzed by it. Was funny out fishing with Trevor and Jay last weekend. Whole time I was more looking at rowing the boat then fishing. :rofl: