Comparison of hovers and intermediate lines?

Discussion in 'Stillwater' started by charlesasmith, Feb 11, 2013.

  1. Irafly

    Irafly Indi "Ira" Jones

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    Or you could fish an indicator and hang your bug right where you want it. Hmmm? Bowers, I think I'd like to try this on those snook.
     
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  2. mbowers

    mbowers Active Member

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    Wouldn't your retrieve be limited to dead slow with the indicator to keep the fly at that depth? Could the indicator put the fish a little off if it's only a foot or three overhead? I think you could get a faster / stealthier retrieve with a sinking line at the desired depth.

    Feel free to try whatever you want on the snook: there's always another dock nearby if they flee the indicator. :) I think the indicator might work even better over some oyster bars with some super smart sheepshead.
     
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  3. Irafly

    Irafly Indi "Ira" Jones

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    Your retrieve is not limited to just super slow but even when you retrieve quickly the fly really doesn't move any different then if it were stripped by a sinking line. Most bugs that fisherman fish do not move quickly anyway and trout are not as reactionary as other species so the do nothing approach often works better than anything else.

    As for an indicator spooking the fish, maybe, but no more so than a fly hitting the water and better yet in shallow I can place the fly in the zone before the fish is there and then leave it there and wait for the fish to move to it. I've fished chironomids inches under an indicator in shallow and fish still haven't figured out that the thing floating on the surface means danger.

    For the snook, I was thinking of one specific situation when the tide was running out from right to left and we were hooking fish without a strip by just casting right and letting the fly drift with the current. It was hard to maintain depth at that point and I was thinking an indicator would have been the best application in that moment. In fact I even developed a little white shrimp pattern for just that case.

    The sheepsheads I caught took much like a trout eating scuds off the bottom at Rocky Ford. I noticed them eating things off the sides of pilings so I placed a shrimpy thing on the piling in the areas where the fish would move to and waited until they were close. I'd twitch the fly and they'ed pick it up. Man those things have crazy teeth.
     
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  4. Drifter

    Drifter Active Member

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    Ira, I move my indi's super fast when I get a nudge and the indi does not go down (trout fishing) I strip 3 to 6 inch strips( 2 or 3 of them) super fast so the fly "RUNS AWAY" and "RISES" like the natural nymph rising to hatch. I know chronies don't move fast but everything else they "chase does" I had to show this to a couple of friends and more often then not they would get the fish to come back a lot more times than letting it sit! My friends just were not moving the indi fast enough to make the fly rise. if you do not move it fast enough it will just slide sideways and doing it right after a nudge is very important so the "BOLT" of the fly catches the trouts eye.

    The way I see it is that everything runs (or swims) when something is trying to eat it!

    Example: I wake up in my tent and bigfoot is nibbling on my toe and all you will see is tighty - whities-- zig-zagging though the forest trees at a high rate of speed! :eek: Whats great is we are all different!!!
     
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  5. troutpocket

    troutpocket Active Member

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    A "eureka" moment for me a few years back was finding that I caught more fish when I slowed down my presentation with my intermediate when it was clear the fish weren't in a "chasing" mood, and adding some quick strips to my indicator presentation when they didn't respond to a "do nothing" approach. And this can change by the hour!
     
  6. mbowers

    mbowers Active Member

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    I like a couple of quick strips to get a prey-chasing response from any predator. I would expect a quick strip would produce a pop from the indicator which is only a foot or two from the fish when fished where a hover line would be used. If the fish is aggressive that might help or be ignored but if the fish is spooky I could see it putting the fish off. Just my two cents.

    I'll have to see your sheepshead technique in person Ira. Supposedly the most difficult fish to fool on a fly around here and they're super tasty too.
     
  7. Nick Clayton

    Nick Clayton Active Member

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    Don't let the term "slip indicator" fool you. To be honest, I can't even remember the last time my indicator popped when setting the hook to a fish, let a lone giving the fly quick strips. This past Saturday not a single fish popped my indicator, something Ira can attest to since he had to help me with damn near every one. You can strip the fly as quickly as you want, it's seldom going to pop the indicator.
     
  8. Irafly

    Irafly Indi "Ira" Jones

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    He meant a popping sound not a popped indicator. In that shallow I would likely not pop or move my indicator at all. Fish in shallow are there for a reason, they are looking for food and when they find it they rarely ever need an incentive to eat it. I personally don't believe I've ever experienced a fish being frightened by my indicator and I've fished a fairly large indicator in as little as 6" of water maybe less with the fly only a couple of inches under that.

    Now snook on the other hand, I think those Florida snook were better trained than the ones I fished for in Ascension Bay, when spotted the guides would splash their hands in the water as loud as they could to encourage the snook to come out to investigate.
     
  9. mbowers

    mbowers Active Member

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    Bang on with my intended meaning of popping the indicator Ira.

    I think Florida snook respond well to smaller splashes. IMHO any splash that's smaller than a typical predator of the fish will make the fish investigate as it might be prey. The hull of my flats boat is known for being a little slappy in a chop but I actually think that helps bring in predators (snook, barracuda, jacks, tarpon) even if it does scare away prey species like mullet or bonefish. :) I'm going to quote your Ascension Bay comments on Florida forums Ira as that validates my theory that the smaller splashes are attractive to snook. Turning on a trolling motor does seem to spook everything though.