confused

Discussion in 'Spey Clave' started by Leroy Laviolet, Jul 3, 2011.

  1. Leroy Laviolet

    Leroy Laviolet Aint no nookie like chinookie

    Joined:
    Apr 22, 2008
    Messages:
    994
    Likes Received:
    2
    Location:
    do'n it 4 the chinookie
    Not to brag or noth'n, but I invented shooting heads.... Yea, that's it , that's the ticket !:rofl:

    Like many things in this sport, looks like the term has evolved a bit in the last 20 years- Thanks for the clarity fellas-:thumb:
     
  2. Wadecalvin

    Wadecalvin Skagitmiester

    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2006
    Messages:
    253
    Likes Received:
    14
    Location:
    Redmond Oregon
    Home Page:
    Here I thought you were confused but it turns out I was confused, and you all just brought that to my attention.
     
  3. James Waggoner

    James Waggoner Active Member

    Joined:
    Jun 16, 2007
    Messages:
    797
    Likes Received:
    48
    Location:
    wa
    The real key of note, in defining the modern day use of the term "Shooting Head", is how the industry defines the term and even more importantly the designers interpretation of said definition. Like flex, weight and speed of action these definitions are as subjective to designer, as they are to us the consumer. Therefore it's important to note the designer's definition of what a "Shooting Head" should be. For instance, Guideline builds most of their two handed rods, described as "Shooting Head Rods", designed for shooting tapers or heads. They don't leave us to guess what a "Shooting Head" is as they have designed their rods to match their shooting heads...The PowerTaper or DDC Lines.

    Why is this important to note? The faster action rod is well suited for the short compact stroke of a shorter head. The same rod with a long head, in the hands of most, would tend to unload while in a long backstroke, creating slack. The forward stroke would unload with lots of authority too quickly causing tailing loops and other power robbing line distortions.

    In reality the Shooting head distintion has several sub-distincitons...Skagit, Scandinavian, Traditional, Competition and their various hybrids...
     
  4. Salmo_g

    Salmo_g Active Member

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2004
    Messages:
    9,866
    Likes Received:
    5,438
    Location:
    Your City ,State
    Leroy is no longer confused. A shooting head is a fly line of any length and weight, that when extended beyond the rod tip, can be "shot" with an overhead, roll, or change of direction roll cast. Leland is correct that Jimmy developed this, first for single hand tournament casting, and later to use, initially for overhead casting with a two handed rod. Jimmy was pitching sinking shooting heads across the Skagit on Sauk Bar overhead casting with 16' prototype rods in the early 1980s. The notion of "Spey" casting these heads, followed immediately with combo floating/sinking heads transitioned within the first year of experimentation that led to early forms of "Skagit" casting. Skagit and Scandi lines are shooting heads.

    Sg
     
  5. fisshman26

    fisshman26 Active Member

    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2003
    Messages:
    429
    Likes Received:
    120
    Location:
    Trail, B.C., Canada.
    Jon Tarantino and Phil Miravelles contributions on the shooting head would need to be reckognized as well. I believe Jon T was the first to use it in competition.
     
  6. Leroy Laviolet

    Leroy Laviolet Aint no nookie like chinookie

    Joined:
    Apr 22, 2008
    Messages:
    994
    Likes Received:
    2
    Location:
    do'n it 4 the chinookie
    Salmo, just between us, I'm still a wee bit confused... :) Though the simple truth too me is that they are all basically shooting heads....:ray1:
     
  7. Nick Clayton

    Nick Clayton Active Member

    Joined:
    Jun 13, 2006
    Messages:
    6,053
    Likes Received:
    7,553
    I can Google with the best of them too, however I believe this horse is quite dead.
     
  8. fisshman26

    fisshman26 Active Member

    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2003
    Messages:
    429
    Likes Received:
    120
    Location:
    Trail, B.C., Canada.
    I actually went old school and looked it up in one of my books!
     
  9. Wadecalvin

    Wadecalvin Skagitmiester

    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2006
    Messages:
    253
    Likes Received:
    14
    Location:
    Redmond Oregon
    Home Page:
    I just googled Bruce Kruk
     
  10. Leroy Laviolet

    Leroy Laviolet Aint no nookie like chinookie

    Joined:
    Apr 22, 2008
    Messages:
    994
    Likes Received:
    2
    Location:
    do'n it 4 the chinookie
    :rofl::rofl::rofl::rofl:
     
  11. Nick Clayton

    Nick Clayton Active Member

    Joined:
    Jun 13, 2006
    Messages:
    6,053
    Likes Received:
    7,553

    You looked it up in a what? A b-o-o-k? Is that one of them old hand held things whats got all them internet pages printed out and attached to it?
     
  12. fisshman26

    fisshman26 Active Member

    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2003
    Messages:
    429
    Likes Received:
    120
    Location:
    Trail, B.C., Canada.
    Nick, that is some funny shit man!
     
  13. Red Shed

    Red Shed "junkyard spey"

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2006
    Messages:
    517
    Likes Received:
    6
    Location:
    Peck, ID
    Home Page:
    To me a head, is a head, is ahead. It doesn't matter if it is 20' long or 100' long. I also don't believe it matters what cast is used to make it sail out there.

    I've always heard that various members of the Golden Gate club were the first to use heads in competition after some of the members devised the method.

    I'm not old enough to go back that far but Leland may be.:)
     
  14. Red Shed

    Red Shed "junkyard spey"

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2006
    Messages:
    517
    Likes Received:
    6
    Location:
    Peck, ID
    Home Page:
    On page 20 of his book "Steelhead Fly Fishing" Trey Combs credits Myron Gregory with introducing the shooting head. He doesn't say Mr. Gregory invented the shooting head however.
     
  15. Nooksack Mac

    Nooksack Mac Active Member

    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2002
    Messages:
    2,262
    Likes Received:
    309
    Location:
    Bellingham, WA, USA.
    A. J. McClane frequently mentioned shooting heads when he was Fishing Editor of "Field & Stream." From the Rainbow Trout entry in "McClane's Standard Fishing Encyclopedia" (1965): "In 1949, the shooting head was introduced on the Eel and Klamath rivers. A development of the Golden Gate Casting Club, it led the way to new distance records in tournament competition. A shooting head is a short, 28-32 foot-long, single-tapered line of suitable weight for your rod. A loop is spliced at both ends, one for the leader and the other for the monofilament line. Ordinarily, a .021-inch monofilament is used, and this is attached to the loop with a Five Turn Jam Knot. Some anglers attach the head directly to the monofilament with a Nail Knot and dispense with the loop. About 75 feet of monofilament is sufficient unless you are an above average caster... These heads are usually custom made and may be obtained from at least four West Coast shops which specialize in steelhead tackle... The virtue of a shooting head is that distance with less effort is easily accomplished. A single false cast is all that is necessary to shoot the fly to fishable distances. A regular forward-taper line will handle much more satisfactorily in strong winds and is preferable under this condition. Also, beginners who are not skilled at casting will find a forward-taper line easier to use. It is essential to master the double haul." He goes on to cover line handling and making one's own heads.