Considering Move

Discussion in 'Fly Fishing Forum' started by Cheesehead4, Feb 11, 2014.

  1. cabezon

    cabezon Sculpin Enterprises

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    An option, especially if the company office is in SODO (south of downtown) is to live on the west side of the sound (Vashon comes to mind) and commute by ferry. You can work on the ferry (and miss a chunk of the traffic) and your kids can grow up in a more rural environment. Visit first and then decide.

    Steve
     
  2. Ron McNeal

    Ron McNeal Life's good!

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    Sadly, the Puget Sound-area does not have any Friday night fish fries. On the upside, the fishing and climate here are far superior to Wisconsin's. I've lived in both the Minneapolis and the Detroit areas and feel quite comfortable believing you'd love it here. You can look forward to learning about, and catching stillwater trout. Midwesterners have no idea about how much fun (and often large) they are.
     
  3. Old Man

    Old Man Just an Old Man

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    I was born in Wi. Family moved to Washington when I was 9. I'm now 78 and living in Montana. I fished and lived on the wet side for over 60 years. There is somewhat good trout fishing on most skinny water. But you have to hunt for it.. I've wasted enough gas to find it, but it's there.

    If you do a search here you might find a few places that I have fished and told about here.
     
  4. KerryS

    KerryS Ignored Member

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    First off Tacoma, Seattle, Everett are not counties. They are cities. Second, and likely more important once outside of the three main cities most of Washington is rural farming communities. I guess southern Oregon is ok if you like living with a bunch of overly self important retirees from California. Can you read "No Trespassing"? Most of the places I used to fish when young are dammed to hell and back and have no trespassing signs plastered all over them. Personally, after growing up in the Rogue River valley, I couldn't get out of there soon enough.
     
  5. Kyle Smith

    Kyle Smith DBA BozoKlown406

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    I lived in Seattle for 5 years, and I thought the little cutthroat of the area were a blast. The lake fishing in WA is really good, and there are countless small trout streams in the mountains. THEY HAVE MOUNTAINS! Car break-ins were and are a massive problem out there, so be careful and be prepared. Finding new water to fish in a new home is one of the most exciting things in a fly fisher's life.
     
  6. Steve Saville

    Steve Saville Active Member

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    I am a Washington native. I've been here all my life and started fishing at age 6. While the fishing isn't "hot" anymore in some areas, the variety of fishing oopportunities is nearly endless once you learn your way around. Sometimes you have to drive a ways like I have o three hour trip to the Olympic Penninsula steelhead rivers or I may have to drive two hours to the Southwest rivers. I live in the second largest metro area (Tacoma) and the traffic sometimes is very bad but not like Los Angeles bad. There are hundreds of small lakes and many larger. I most often take advantage of the saltwater beaches of Puget Sound and I can take a longer drive and jetty fish on the coast. I can fish for Tiger Musky, Carp, Walleye, Bass, Bluegill, trout, Sea Bass, and five varieties of Salmon in season, on any given day and we have short seasons for Halibut and Ling Cod (big ones).

    That's all on the west side of the Cascade Mountains. Then there is the east side and though I have to drive a bit, that offers another muriad of opportunity. The camping, hiking, skiing, and other outdoor activities are endless as well.

    I've lived in many other states for short periods of time and always found my way back here. I won't leave now and no matter what some people say or believe, the quality of life here is pretty damn good. If your job brings you here then you probably couldn't find a better place for a family that likes the outdoors. Mild weather, warm (not hot) summers and rainy winters with little lowland snow. It doesn't get much better.
     
  7. Seth Tyson

    Seth Tyson Active Member

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    FACT, There's no brown trout in WA.....:rolleyes:
     
  8. triploidjunkie

    triploidjunkie Active Member

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    Nope. Not at all....;) 173126169381452.jpg 173126339381435.jpg
     
  9. Rick Todd

    Rick Todd Active Member

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  10. KerryS

    KerryS Ignored Member

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    I wonder what all those "brown trout" that I caught out of Pass Lake really were? Perhaps you meant to say there are no native brown trout in WA.
     
  11. GAT

    GAT Dumbfounded

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    Cheesehead, it all comes down to people... lots of people.

    I could move to Seattle or Portland and make 4 times per year more $$$ per month working a similar job I have in the Willamette Valley... but I do not like crowds and I don't want to drive at least two hours to avoid them.

    If you can afford to live on the outskirts of the metro areas, maybe the over crowded condition wouldn't be a concern but good grief... there's a ton of people in and around Seattle.

    Portland is too crowded for me and it doesn't have a population even close to that of the Seattle area.

    I don't know what the rat race situation is where you live now but if you plan to move to the Seattle metro area, be prepared to deal with a ton of folks.

    It really isn't a bad place to live and there are many fishing options, like I said, it just depends on your tolerance of crowds... mine is very low so perhaps, you shouldn't go by me.
     
  12. Steve Slater

    Steve Slater Active Member

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    Cheesehead4 - I'm a Washington State native but now live in Madison, WI. My parents live in Kitsap county, across the Sound from Seattle, and I travel back there on a regular basis to visit and fish. There's tons of great fishing in Washington, from beaches to rivers to small streams. There's also lots of information and people who can help you (myself included). But it's not as easy as it is in WI. As you mentioned, you can currently be on the water in a few minutes from your house. In WA, unless you have a house in an ideal spot, it's generally more of an excursion. Steelhead and salmon fishing are very different games in WI and WA, so don't take a Root River, WI experience as an example of WA steelheading. Personally, I'd love to move back. But living in the Seattle area is expensive and crowded. If you will be working near the stadiums, you will either have a painful commute or a very expensive house (and "expensive" has a very different meaning in Hudson, WI and Seattle). You need to really understand what you are getting in to, particularly if you have always lived in a small town. Send me a pm if you want to chat.
     
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  13. Old Man

    Old Man Just an Old Man

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    I went back to Washington in June to pick up my Granddaughter. I went to Everett to do it. I-5 was bumper to bumper heading towards Marysville.. It was a good thing that I learned the back roads when I lived there. It sure made it easy to get around that way. There is more than the freeways to get someplace.

    I now live in Dillon, Montana. We have two signal lights in town. No more than them two in about 75 miles. The next closest light is in Butte.
     
  14. teedub

    teedub Active Member

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    I am from MI - I finally had enough of the winters. I walked down I - 80 with a snow shovel until someone asked me what it was. Ended up in Sacramento. After a few trips to the Sierra's to fish and great weather (I was looking for sun) i discovered the rest of the state was a consistent traffic jam, long lines to eat food that was too expensive and a school system that was heading straight down. I took a job in Seattle and loved the first ten years, then everyone on I - 5 from CA drove up to Seattle. Crowds built up and I moved over the Cascades to save my life from a heart attack.
     
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  15. Chris Bellows

    Chris Bellows Your Preferred WFF Poster

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    why sell the boat? imo, the best fishing washington state has to offer is in the saltwater. year round options and almost zero crowding... and plenty of relatively unknown places still to be explored with a fly rod.

    chris