Cool Campsite Ideas

Discussion in 'Camping, Hiking, Cooking' started by Dubblegee, Mar 1, 2014.

  1. Vladimir Steblina

    Vladimir Steblina Retired Forester...now fishing instead of working

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    We used a similar system way back in the 1970's for 10 day work shift in the back country of Sequoia National Park.

    Our cook was also a butcher so we froze all the meat prior to cutting. We also had a schedule going from fish, chicken, to beef and finishing with canned hams.

    It all worked and nobody ever got sick. The key was the stuff that could spoil early was eaten early in the work shift. The southern Sierra's are pretty warm in summer. I was impressed with how well the system worked.

    The only issue I had was that the cook was an alcoholic and he was great until his friends rode horses for 10 miles to visit him in camp. I cooked breakfast for the crew the following morning. Fortunately, that only happened once.
     
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  2. Alex MacDonald

    Alex MacDonald that's His Lordship, to you.....

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    With both the pop-up A-frame trailer with a heated mattress, among other amenities, we still use the tents we have, including a Hilleberg Nammatj-3 for backpacking, BUT... Along with all that stuff, I'm seriously pondering a Baker tent for elk camp this year, a 10X10. We seem to be drifting away from sleeping on the ground, even with NeoAir mattresses. There's a guy who makes no-screw, take apart wooden beds (as opposed to cots). Add a double bed, some candlelight from the lanterns, a few cheap Oriental-style rugs, and a decent chair, and you got a really nice camp. Oh, did I mention this season I'll haul a Hawken .50 long range flint rifle for elk? Really goes with the camp setup:cool:
     
  3. Alex MacDonald

    Alex MacDonald that's His Lordship, to you.....

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    Vladimir, you post on the Sierra reminded me of the difference between the northern Cascades and the Sierra. I've put many, many miles under my boots in the Sierra, hunting, backpacking, and fishing, but only encountered bad weather occasionally there. Maybe I was lucky, but I don't feel the weather in the high Sierra is anywhere near as potentially bad as here. It's different, don't you think? Here, you can easily die if you don't know what you're doing.
     
  4. Mark Walker

    Mark Walker Active Member

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    Tell that to the Donner Party. :D
     
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  5. 2506

    2506 Active Member

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    If you buy a cheap brand of canned American-made beer owned by a multi-national conglomerate you can freeze them. They are colder than ice and pack into a cooler much easier than a frozen gallon jug.
     
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  6. Porter

    Porter Active Member

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    String the can beer and place in the river....natures fridge. Can over glass too. In earlier days we use to make lures (spinning) from the pull tab of the can....and damn they worked....or maybe thats what I want to remember :confused: (no they really did :) )

    The number one trick....always bring a good knife!;)

    Thanks for sharing above....good thoughts.
     
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  7. Greg Armstrong

    Greg Armstrong OldRodsHaveMoreFun

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    Alex, this reminds me of a number of decades back (quite a number, actually) we used to use a canvas Baker tent in the warmer months, but switch to a wall tent in the fall (heavy suckers, they were). We'd deck it out with everything including a wood stove, table and chairs, the whole bit. Made it real comfy. So much so that it took a real serious effort to work up the resolve to leave the thing before daybreak into the snow to go out and find "the big one".
    A "Baby Ben" alarm clock helped get us up and going. That's my contribution...
    Oh, and take a shovel too. Lots of potential uses for that especially if you get your invincible 4x4 rig stuck in the snow far from civilization.
    "T.P" too - can be a real drag if forgotten.
     
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  8. Greg Armstrong

    Greg Armstrong OldRodsHaveMoreFun

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    Yeah, but that was in the northern Sierras.
    If it happens to any of you there these days, just walk up the ridge to the north 'til you hit I-80 and stick your thumb out.
    And do it before anyone in your party gets too hungry...
     
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  9. bennysbuddy

    bennysbuddy the sultan of swing

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    Always bring a harmonica even if you can't play one, after you stop playing the thing everybody will be happy, at least thats how it works out when i play at camp!!!!
     
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  10. dfl

    dfl Active Member

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    I learned this one from my ole buddy Skip Wheeler, who now resides in OR. The biggest cheapest framing hammer you can find. Makes things go where they don't want to then brings them back. Changes the shape of things. Relocates inconveniently located things. Makes small things out of big things-seldom works in reverse. Creates irrigation channels. Holds things in place. Its the handiest single tool I take camping. Try it and I'll bet you agree.
     
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  11. Jim Ficklin

    Jim Ficklin Genuine Montana Fossil

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    I've never gone tent camping without a Pulaski, shovel, collapsible bucket, space blanket, & fire grate of some sort. Stoves fail; fire is pretty reliable . . .
     
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  12. Trapper

    Trapper Author, Writer, Photographer

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    Here's a few more things to think about:


    [​IMG]

    -- A chair with a back on it. You may be amazed how much better your back will feel.
    -- Big metal dish pans with handles. You can put them on the woodstove to heat the water, thus saving fuel. Plastic dish pans are cheap and light but somehow they always end up splitting down the side in cold weather or getting a hole melted into them. If you get halfway through dishes and the water goes cold you can just put the metal pans on a stove to warm up the water.
    -- Buckets. I like metal buckets because again, I'll use the heat from the woodstove to warm the water instead of using propane. Hot water for showers or dishes is in constant demand in my camps.

    I'm using this setup to wash my clothes. The big trash can is my secondary and final rinse. We use that big can to hang all our smelly camp stuff that attracts bears. We hang it 20 feet off the ground on a pole suspended between two trees and a pulley.

    The scotch is for off days doing laundry. One of the perks of being a cook is clients leave brown liquor like this Blue Label Johnny Walker. It's not something I would buy, but damn it was good sipping it sitting in the sun reading a book with no one for miles around me.

    Jim's idea of having a low-tech backup is a very, very, good one. Stuff will break when you're using it hard. This is my low-tech answer:

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    It's called a Fire pan. Often, if there's fire restrictions, you can't legally have a camp fire, but you can use these. They're very portable. You can use them for grilling like shown in the above photo. Or you can use it for Dutch Oven cooking like this:

    [​IMG]



    Trapper
     
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  13. Jim Ficklin

    Jim Ficklin Genuine Montana Fossil

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    A suitable tarp is also a must. Good catch, Trapper.
     
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  14. IveofIone

    IveofIone Active Member

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    Always take a deck of cards. If you ever get lost just stop and start playing solitaire. It won't be long before some smart ass appears over your shoulder and tells you to play the black ten on the red jack....

    Ive
     
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  15. Trapper

    Trapper Author, Writer, Photographer

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    I like to cool beer and pop in the creek like this:

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    It's in the shade and I bury the plastic milk crate so the cans float. I put the cans in upside down but my camp guests always want to put them in tab up. That collects silt that you have to rinse off before opening. Upside down = no silt. I also do it this way because USFS regs dictate you must not leave pop and beer in the creek overnight, so the crate makes it handy to move.

    Trapper